dustweare dustweare

I was born (1984) in a small town along the eucalyptus-scented northwestern coast of Spain, but I was raised in Madrid. I hold a BA in International Economics and Development from the Universidad Complutense of Madrid, having studied also in The Netherlands and Cuba. Photography has opened me to a new level of perception. My images often reflect my fascination with the human being and its conflicted existence, at the same time raising questions to myself as I try to comprehend my own path. I attended the Eddie Adams Workshop 2013 and I am a Global Post GroundTruth fellow. My work has been published in Paris Match, Der Spiegel, TIME, BBC, BBC Travel, The Atlantic, Global Post, and Vice among others. I have received commissions from clients like The Times, Channel 4 and Human Rights Watch. Red Bull, Geox and Emirates Airlines are among my commercial clients. I am part of Unframe Photographers collective and represented by Getty Global Assignment. I am available for both editorial and commercial commissions worldwide. If I am not responding to emails I am probably surfing waves or climbing a mountain somewhere. I will get back to you soon.

Media created

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Child Labor in Yemen
Sana'a, Yemen
By dustweare
24 Sep 2014

Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi has been a labourer in the capital Sanaa since the age of seven. But his is, unfortunately, not an extraordinary case. He's one of more than a million child labourers in Yemen, and the numbers are increasing as the country is plunging deeper into its political and financial crisis.

Shotlist:

Saleh pushes his wheelbarrow towards work in the old city of Sanaa
Close up of Saleh's face while he speaks in off
Interview of Saleh in the living room of his family's house
Saleh lifting cage full of groceries in the market
Saleh's employer talking while Saleh loads the car
Video portrait of a kid at work in Old Sanaa
Sanaa cityscape. Women veiled walking, cars passing by, barbed wire, mountains in background
Soldiers controlling cars in a check point in Sanaa city
Saleh walking the street towards his house
Close up of Saleh's dad while he speaks in off
Saleh's father sitting in the house's living room while he is interviewed
Saleh entering the house
Saleh's father praying in the living room
Saleh's walking up the stairs of the house
Saleh's father sitting in the house's living room while he is interviewed
pot pouring steam in the kitchen
Saleh's brothers and father eat in the living room

Script:

Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi walking through the streets of Sana'a.

SALEH Abdallah al-Raymi (Arabic): “Here you find real heritage, and it's pretty. Tourists come here to visit.”

VO: “Through the narrow, historical streets of the old city in Sana'a. [Two-second pause] Through architecture you only find here in Yemen. A unique place. But also the workplace of many children.”

SALEH (Arabic): “My name is Saleh Abdallah Hassan Ahmad al-Maswari, and I'm 16 years old.”

Saleh BEING INTERVIEWED

SALEH (Arabic): “I get up in the morning, and then I go to school. I stay there till 12 o'clock, before going back home. At home I eat lunch, and then I go to work.”

Saleh WHILE HE'S WORKING

SALEH (Arabic): “I work with a wheel-barrow at the market place. I transport vegetables and fruit. Anything really.”

VO: “Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi started working when he was seven years old. But his story is not unique. [Pause for two seconds]. In Yemen there are 1,3 million child labourers. Children as young as 5 are seen working in the Yemeni capitol. And the work is tough.”

VO: “The country has seen years of political and economical unrest, and can't seem to turn the tide. As a result, many families are forced to send their children to work. For most of them, it's not a choice.”

Saleh WALKING TOWARDS THE HOUSE

ABDALLAH Hassan al-Raymi (Arabic): “I'm the father of Mohammed, the oldest, and then Saleh, Mokhtar, Aziz, Fikri, Osama, Amira, Uthnan. All in all we're twelve people in the family.”

VO: “Abdallah Hassan al-Raymi WANTS the best for his children. But kidney failure has made him unable to work. And with no functioning welfare state in Yemen, three of his sons are now the family providers. [Pause, two seconds] Their father has bigger dreams for them.”

ABDALLAH Hassan al-Raymi (Arabic): “For example for Saleh to go study, and then get work in company or at a factory. That's better. What they do now is hard. It's really hard work to be at the market with the wheel-barrows. But if they could work somewhere with a steady paycheck, that would be a lot better. Then they would be able to cover all the expenses we have.”

VO: “Their biggest worry right now is their landlord threatening them with eviction. They are not able to pay the full rent every month.”

STAND-UP: It’s here through historical streets inaccessible by car where childern like Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi are needed. The problem of child labor in Yemen has become severe, maybe too severe to be solved in the near future.

NOOR al-Kasadi, Child Protection Specialist, UNICEF (English): “It affect them negatively actually. It deprive the children ...”

VO: “He's working every day, but says he has been lucky. He hasn't been exposed to any kind of severe harassment. But, it's a hard life. A life he doesn't want for his younger siblings.”

SALEH (Arabic): “A man can do this job easily. But a boy isn't able to do it as well. [PAUSE] I see myself as a boy -- still.”

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Child Labor in Yemen (with voice over)
Sana'a
By dustweare
09 Feb 2014

February 10, 2014
Sana'a, Yemen

Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi has been a labourer in the capital Sanaa since the age of seven. But his is, unfortunately, not an extraordinary case. He's one of more than a million child labourers in Yemen, and the numbers are increasing as the country is plunging deeper into its political and financial crisis.

Shotlist:

Saleh pushes his wheelbarrow towards work in the old city of Sanaa
Close up of Saleh's face while he speaks in off
Interview of Saleh in the living room of his family's house
Saleh lifting cage full of groceries in the market
Saleh's employer talking while Saleh loads the car
Video portrait of a kid at work in Old Sanaa
Sanaa cityscape. Women veiled walking, cars passing by, barbed wire, mountains in background
Soldiers controlling cars in a check point in Sanaa city
Saleh walking the street towards his house
Close up of Saleh's dad while he speaks in off
Saleh's father sitting in the house's living room while he is interviewed
Saleh entering the house
Saleh's father praying in the living room
Saleh's walking up the stairs of the house
Saleh's father sitting in the house's living room while he is interviewed
pot pouring steam in the kitchen
Saleh's brothers and father eat in the living room

Script:

Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi walking through the streets of Sana'a.

SALEH Abdallah al-Raymi (Arabic): “Here you find real heritage, and it's pretty. Tourists come here to visit.”

VO: “Through the narrow, historical streets of the old city in Sana'a. [Two-second pause] Through architecture you only find here in Yemen. A unique place. But also the workplace of many children.”

SALEH (Arabic): “My name is Saleh Abdallah Hassan Ahmad al-Maswari, and I'm 16 years old.”

Saleh BEING INTERVIEWED

SALEH (Arabic): “I get up in the morning, and then I go to school. I stay there till 12 o'clock, before going back home. At home I eat lunch, and then I go to work.”

Saleh WHILE HE'S WORKING

SALEH (Arabic): “I work with a wheel-barrow at the market place. I transport vegetables and fruit. Anything really.”

VO: “Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi started working when he was seven years old. But his story is not unique. [Pause for two seconds]. In Yemen there are 1,3 million child labourers. Children as young as 5 are seen working in the Yemeni capitol. And the work is tough.”

VO: “The country has seen years of political and economical unrest, and can't seem to turn the tide. As a result, many families are forced to send their children to work. For most of them, it's not a choice.”

Saleh WALKING TOWARDS THE HOUSE

ABDALLAH Hassan al-Raymi (Arabic): “I'm the father of Mohammed, the oldest, and then Saleh, Mokhtar, Aziz, Fikri, Osama, Amira, Uthnan. All in all we're twelve people in the family.”

VO: “Abdallah Hassan al-Raymi WANTS the best for his children. But kidney failure has made him unable to work. And with no functioning welfare state in Yemen, three of his sons are now the family providers. [Pause, two seconds] Their father has bigger dreams for them.”

ABDALLAH Hassan al-Raymi (Arabic): “For example for Saleh to go study, and then get work in company or at a factory. That's better. What they do now is hard. It's really hard work to be at the market with the wheel-barrows. But if they could work somewhere with a steady paycheck, that would be a lot better. Then they would be able to cover all the expenses we have.”

VO: “Their biggest worry right now is their landlord threatening them with eviction. They are not able to pay the full rent every month.”

STAND-UP: It’s here through historical streets inaccessible by car where childern like Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi are needed. The problem of child labor in Yemen has become severe, maybe too severe to be solved in the near future.

NOOR al-Kasadi, Child Protection Specialist, UNICEF (English): “It affect them negatively actually. It deprive the children ...”

VO: “He's working every day, but says he has been lucky. He hasn't been exposed to any kind of severe harassment. But, it's a hard life. A life he doesn't want for his younger siblings.”

SALEH (Arabic): “A man can do this job easily. But a boy isn't able to do it as well. [PAUSE] I see myself as a boy -- still.”

Frame 0004
Child labour in Yemen (VO - Norwegian)
Sanaa
By dustweare
14 Sep 2013

Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi has been a labourer in the capital Sanaa since the age of seven. But his is, unfortunately, not an extraordinary case. He's one of more than a million child labourers in Yemen, and the numbers are increasing as the country is plunging deeper into its political and financial crisis.

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After the Spring in Yemen (3 of 28)
Hodeidah, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Aug 2013

An empty market during the afternoon in Hodeidah city. The afternoon is the time for chewing qat, a plant widely cultivated in Yemen, whose leaves contain a compound with effects similar to those of amphetamines. Among the people from the Arabian penisula and the horn of Africa, qat chewing has a long history as a social custom dating back thousands of years. Studies have shown that only in Yemen, almost 80% of its population spend 3 to 4 hours a day chewing the plant. Moreover, the enormous need for water of the qat industry is on course to make the capital, Sana’a, the first in the world to completely run out of water.

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After the Spring in Yemen (4 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Aug 2013

Check point at the entrance of the Shia Houthi celebration of the Prophet Mohammed's anniversary in the outskirts of Sana'a, where every individual has to step on the United States and Israel flags in order to get inside the venue. Tens of thousands gathered at the event. The Houthi slogan written on their headbands reads: "Death to America, death to Israel, damn the Jews and victory to Islam".

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After the Spring in Yemen (5 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Aug 2013

Kids play soccer in the impoverished Museik neighborhood.

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After the Spring in Yemen (8 of 28)
Hodeidah, Yemen
By dustweare
10 Oct 2012

A market during the afternoon, Hodeidah city. The afternoon is the time for chewing qat, a plant widely cultivated in Yemen, whose leaves contain a compound with effects similar to those of amphetamines. Among the people from the Arabian penisula and the horn of Africa, qat chewing has a long history as a social custom dating back thousands of years. Studies have shown that only in Yemen, almost 80% of its population spend 3 to 4 hours a day chewing the plant. Moreover, the enormous need for water of the qat industry is on course to make the capital, Sana’a, the first in the world to completely run out of water.

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After the Spring in Yemen (9 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
11 Sep 2012

March in the streets of Sana'a against the still powerful Yemeni ex-president, Ali Adullah Saleh, who was ousted from the presidency after a series of popular protests across the main cities in 2011, which ended in the brink of civil war.

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After the Spring in Yemen (10 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
31 Jul 2013

Flooded street in Old Sanaa during Ramadan, the rainy season. This photo was taken right before "Magreb", the prayer call to break the fast.

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After the Spring in Yemen (12 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
19 Aug 2012

Playful children the first day of Eid holidays dressing new clothes and handling bb guns in Old Sana'a. Yemen is the second most heavily armed society in the World after the United States.

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After the Spring in Yemen (13 of 28)
Thula, Yemen
By dustweare
26 Aug 2012

The groom and his father. A wedding in Thula, Amran province.

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After the Spring in Yemen (14 of 28)
Al-mahweet, Yemen
By dustweare
26 Apr 2013

Man chewing qat by a window in his house in Al-Dawila. Al-Mahweet governorate.

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After the Spring in Yemen (15 of 28)
Thula, Yemen
By dustweare
26 Aug 2012

Jambiya dance during the celebration of a wedding in Thula, the Haraz mountains, province of Amran. Dating back centuries to the pre-Islamic era, the Yemeni dagger is used for self-defense and in traditional dance.

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After the Spring in Yemen (16 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
29 Jul 2012

Two boys relaxing inside the Grand Saleh mosque, Sana'a. Inaugurated in November 2008, it can hold up to 40,000 worshippers and cost nearly 60 million US dollars to build. A number not easy to digest given the country's suffering from various widespread different kinds of humanitarian crisis.

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After the Spring in Yemen (17 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
05 Mar 2013

The entrance of a museum that Ali Abdullah Saleh, Yemen's deposed president, opened to honor himself. The gallery is located inside the Grand Saleh mosque, in Sana'a. The centerpiece of the museum are the charred clothes he was wearing when a bomb exploded in the Grand Saleh mosque aiming to end his life in 2011. Also complementing the garments, there is a display of pieces of shrapnel found in his body afterwards.

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After the Spring in Yemen (18 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
29 Jul 2013

The Grand Saleh mosque, Sana'a. Inaugurated in November 2008, it can hold up to 40,000 worshippers and cost nearly 60 million US dollars to build despite Yemen being the Arab world's poorest nation.

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After the Spring in Yemen (19 of 28)
Hammam, Yemen
By dustweare
11 Jul 2013

Kid walks through the khat fields of his family holding the Quran in the sacred month of Ramadan.

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After the Spring in Yemen (20 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
20 Aug 2012

Souq Hajjar, a qat marquet in Sana'a. The qat is a plant widely cultivated in Yemen, whose leaves contain a compound with effects similar to those of amphetamines. Among the people from the Arabian penisula and the horn of Africa, qat chewing has a long history as a social custom dating back thousands of years. Studies have shown that only in Yemen, almost 80% of its population spend 3 to 4 hours a day chewing the plant. Moreover, the enormous need for water of the qat industry is on course to make the capital, Sana’a, the first in the world to completely run out of water.

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After the Spring in Yemen (21 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
20 Sep 2012

March in the streets of Sana'a against the still powerful Yemeni ex-president, Ali Adullah Saleh, who was ousted from the presidency after a series of popular protests across the main cities in 2011, which ended in the brink of civil war.

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After the Spring in Yemen (24 of 28)
Kawkaban, Yemen
By dustweare
20 Aug 2012

Two women walking during the midday prayer call in the village of Kawkaban, the Haraz Mountains, province of Al-Mahweet.

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After the Spring in Yemen (26 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
11 Sep 2012

March in the streets of Sana'a against the still powerful Yemeni ex-president, Ali Adullah Saleh, who was ousted from the presidency after a series of popular protests across the main cities in 2011, which ended in the brink of civil war.

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After the Spring in Yemen (27 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
06 Aug 2012

Rooftop view in Old Sana'a. Sana'a has been inhabited for more than 2,500 years, one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. In the 7th and 8th centuries the city became a major centre for the propagation of Islam. This religious and political heritage can be seen in the 103 mosques, 14 hammams and over 6,000 houses, all built before the 11th century. At an altitude of 2,300 metres (7,500 ft), it is also one of the highest capital cities in the world.

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After the Spring in Yemen (28 of 28)
Hadramawt, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Aug 2013

Aerial view of the vast harsh lands in Hadramawt province.

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Arabian Jurassic Park (1 of 24)
Socotra, Yemen
By dustweare
02 Nov 2012

In Skand area, the Socotra's highest peak (1525 m) is to be found among a series of micro-climates which have developed many different kinds of atmospheres, from humid rainforests in the high lands of the Haghier mountains to the open savannah-like prairies which lead the way through mysterious valleys to the crisp blue ocean. The young sharp mountains of Skand form a massif of vertical cliffs where Dragon Blood trees and a variety of endemic plants grow in impossible ways. Small ruins of ancient constructions dot the landscape.

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Arabian Jurassic Park (2 of 24)
Socotra, Yemen
By dustweare
02 Nov 2012

Man drinking fermented milk in his hut. Diksam, the Haguier mountains.

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Arabian Jurassic Park (3 of 24)
Socotra, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Nov 2012

A house in a little village located halfway between the Dragon Blood forest in Firmihin and the southern coast. The family invited us in for rice, fermented milk, tea and a break from harsh midday heat. Most of the Socotrans who live in such inaccessible areas don't have electricity or running water.

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Arabian Jurassic Park (4 of 24)
Socotra, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Nov 2012

Dragon Blood tree forest facing Dirhur river valley. The Dragon Blood tree is a Socotran icon and one of the most striking plants of the island. This strange-looking tree is one of its countless endemic species. The Dragon's blood’s red sap has been used as medicine and dye for hundreds of years. Experts say the future of the species is threatened due mainly to the climate change and to a series of problems that have lead to poor reproduction of the tree.

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Arabian Jurassic Park (5 of 24)
Socotra, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Nov 2012

Trekking along the range that separates Dirhur and Durhur valleys to the south of the Haigher Mountains. Since a new airport was built in 2002, interest in this remote paradise has grown enormously. Though, even at its height prior to the Arab Spring, only 4,000 or so people visit. The area is attractive for committed travelers interested in ecotourism in exotic places. Nevertheless the traditional ways that have endured for centuries, which have been the keepers of Socotra's outstanding biodiversity, may be irreversibly damaged if the mass tourism and speculation takes over the place.

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Arabian Jurassic Park (7 of 24)
Socotra, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Nov 2012

View from Dirhur valley. The omnipresent Dragon Blood tree is Socotra's icon, one of the most striking plants of the island. This strange-looking tree is one of its countless endemic species. The ancients thought its characteristically red sap was dragon's blood, and used it as a medicine and dye for hundreds of years. Experts have stated that the future of the species is threatened due to its poor reproduction under the climate change conditions.

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Arabian Jurassic Park (8 of 24)
Socotra, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Nov 2012

Landscape in Skand, the Haghier mountains. Studies have shown that the presence of fog in the highlands is crucial for Socotra's vegetation, as it represents up to 77% of total moisture received. Species like the Dragon Blood tree use their upraised branches to capture the mist. Socotra’s climate has been crucial in the evolution of its flora and fauna, leading to its outstanding biodiversity.

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Arabian Jurassic Park (9 of 24)
Socotra, Yemen
By dustweare
09 Nov 2012

The characteristic socotran greeting is one more feature of the island people's uniqueness. The inhabitants of Socotra are different from the mainland population, they are considered to be a mixture of African, Greek, Portuguese and Arab. They speak an ancient, unwritten language, which was spoken in pre-Islamic Arabia for many centuries. The Socotran lifestyle has been very traditional, sustainable and virtually self-sufficient for all primary needs throughout their story, given the limited contact with the outside world.

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Arabian Jurassic Park (10 of 24)
Socotra, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Nov 2012

Underwater view in the Dihamari protected area, located on the northeast coast of the island. Some species of rare fish, like the Acropora palifera and Rhincodon, are only found on Socotra.