Mariwan Salihi Mariwan Salihi

Mariwan F. Salihi is a Netherlands national, and a freelance journalist covering Iraqi and other Middle Eastern issues. He previously worked for "The Kurdish Globe" [Iraq's only English-language newspaper] and "Rudaw" [a multi-language news outlet], both based in Erbil, capital of northern Iraq's Kurdistan Region. He was also the English editor, for a brief period, at AKNews [Iraqi Kurdistan's news agency, based in Erbil] - and he's a eKurd.net contributing writer since 2009.

Mariwan F. Salihi has, furthermore, also contributed to numerous international and regional newspapers, publications and websites, including "Gulf News" [one of the largest, and most read, English-language dailies in the Middle East and North Africa region], "The National" [an influential, English-language daily based in Abu Dhabi] and the English-language daily, "Khaleej Times," both based in Dubai, the United Arab Emirates.

He was also the editor-in-chief and star-writer and photographer at iErbil (www.ierbil.com), Iraqi Kurdistan's first English-language lifestyle magazine and site, from October 2011- March 2012.

He started his career in his early childhood as a TV presenter, later becoming a Dubai-based model who appeared in several recognized advertisements.

Mariwan F. Salihi resided in numerous countries, besides the Netherlands, including Russia, the United States, United Arab Emirates (UAE), Germany, Qatar and Iraq, and recently relocated to Kuwait temporarily.

He's fluent in 7 languages: English, Arabic, Dutch, German, Spanish, French and Kurdish. Mariwan Salihi's photographs and writing talents appear regularly on popular sites, newspapers and magazines throughout the Middle East, Europe and beyond.

Collections created

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QATAR
doha
By Mariwan Salihi
01 Sep 2012

The Pearl-Qatar, a mixed-use, man-made, island development in the Qatari capital Doha. Protesters gather outside US Embassy in Doha, Qatar, to condemn the Anti-Islam movie

Media created

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Baghdad's Art-Deco houses in Al-Bataw...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

Art-Deco houses line both sides of Al-Bataween's main road. The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

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An Armenian Orthodox Church in Baghda...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

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African immigrants in Baghdad's Al-Ba...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

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African immigrants in a Baghdad cafe,...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

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African immigrants in the Iraqi capit...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

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African immigrant in the Iraqi capita...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

Date: November 6, 2011

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African immigrant in the Iraqi capita...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

Date: November 6, 2011

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African immigrants in Baghdad's Al-Ba...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

Date: November 6, 2011

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African immigrants in Baghdad's Al-Ba...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

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Art-Deco houses in Baghdad's Al-Bataw...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

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Aerial view of Doha, Qatar
Doha, Qatar
By Mariwan Salihi
02 Sep 2012

Aerial view of Doha's West Bay area, north of the Qatari capital.

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Aerial View of The Pearl-Qatar, in Do...
The Pearl Qatar, Doha, Qatar
By Mariwan Salihi
02 Sep 2012

The Pearl-Qatar, a mixed-use, man-made, island development in the Qatari capital Doha.

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The Pearl-Qatar, Doha, Qatar
The Pearl Qatar, Doha, Qatar
By Mariwan Salihi
02 Sep 2012

The mixed-use artificial island development of "The Pearl-Qatar," in the Qatari capital, Doha.

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Qatar Airways planes at Doha Internat...
Doha, Qatar
By Mariwan Salihi
02 Sep 2012

Planes of Qatar Airways, the flag carrier of Qatar, at Doha International Airport.

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Aerial Photo of the Qatari capital Doha
Doha, Qatar
By Mariwan Salihi
02 Sep 2012

Aerial photo of Doha's glitzy business district, "West Bay," north of the Qatari capital.

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Aerial Photo of Erbil
Erbil, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Jun 2012

Aerial views of the outskirts of Erbil, capital of northern Iraq's Kurdistan Region.

The city of nearly two million inhabitants is seeing massive developments, thanks to its relative safety , foreign investments and a growing energy sector. In this photo: Royal City, English Village, parts of the Italian City, Erbil Divan Hotel, Erbil Rotana Hotel, Sami Abdulrahman Park and the Erbil International Fairground.