AdelineGF Adeline Bailleul

Adeline Bailleul is a french video journalist, documentary filmmaker and photographer covering North Africa. Bilingual in French and English and with notions of Arabic and Spanish, her experience includes working for international media outlets such as CNN, Africa 24, Al Jazeera English, AJ+, Vice, Journeyman TV, Huffington Post, Euronews…Adeline earned a BA in Law/Philosophy at University Panthéon Sorbonne, a BA in Journalism at the European Institute of Journalism in Paris followed by a Masters degree in Television Journalism from Goldsmiths University of London. As her determination to tell stories became more important, she co-founded Global Fronteras Production with her partner Tarek Bouraque to produce stories that matter. Tarek Bouraque is a moroccan video journalist and documentary filmmaker who develops an expertise for digital media and data journalism. He is the co-founder of the first Web-TV in North Africa. Their objective is to find different ways of storytelling and story-making. Politics and policy, Human Rights, globalization, environment, social protests and minority issues represent Adeline's main fields of expertise and she is currently focusing on post-Arab Spring transitions. Adeline and Tarek are currently developing a documentary series about the Berber resistance through North Africa.

Collections created

Thumb sm
2014 Presidential elections in Tunisia
Tunis
By Adeline Bailleul
22 Nov 2014

Photos of the polling stations in Tunis during the 2014 presidential elections.

With a voter turnout around 64 percent, this election marks the country's first democratic transition of power. Over 80,000 servicemen were deployed to ensure safety at polling stations, where voting went fairly smoothly throughout the day.

Beji Caid Essebsi of the secular Nida Tounes is expected to emerge on top, with Moncef Marzouki of the moderate Islamist Ennahda party following close behind. However, at the close of polling, no candidate seemed likely to have enough votes to win outright, in which case a run-off would take place in December.

Official results are expected to be released Wednesday.

Media created

Frame 0004
Tunisians and Foreigners Rally Agains...
Tunis
By Adeline Bailleul
19 Mar 2015

Protests erupted outside the National Bardo Museum in Tunis where an attack left 23 people dead the day before. Citizens and visitors speak out against the attacks.

Tunisian authorities have taken nine suspects into custody amid an ongoing search for the perpetrators of the attack.

Frame 0004
Tunsia: French Hostage in Museum Attack
Tunis
By Adeline Bailleul
18 Mar 2015

Interview with a French woman taken hostage during the terrorist attack on the Bardo Museum in Tunis, Tunisia. Declining to give her family name, she identified only as José Marie.

Frame 0004
Multi-sensory Implicit Learning in Tu...
Tunis
By Adeline Bailleul
15 Feb 2015

Most of us are accustomed to learning about the world primarily through our senses of sight and hearing. The so-called “lower" senses; smell, taste, and touch have rarely if ever been accorded a place in mainstream education. In Tunisia, Dr Slim Masmoudi has developed a teaching method known as the MIL: Multi-sensory Implicit Learning. By engaging all of their senses, the MIL method aims to nourish children’s creativity and to enhance positive emotions.

Thumb sm
Tunisia elections 10
Tunis, Tunisia
By Adeline Bailleul
22 Nov 2014

A local man votes in the presidential elections.

Thumb sm
Tunisia elections 13
Tunis, Tunisia
By Adeline Bailleul
22 Nov 2014

Men queue to vote in the presidential elections.

Thumb sm
Tunisia elections 14
Tunis, Tunisia
By Adeline Bailleul
22 Nov 2014

A local woman shows her finger stained with purple ink, a sign that she voted.

Thumb sm
Tunisia elections 05
Tunis, Tunisia
By Adeline Bailleul
22 Nov 2014

An officer of the The High Independent Authority for the Elections stands by to help voters get into orderly lines.

Thumb sm
Tunisia elections 06
Tunis, Tunisia
By Adeline Bailleul
22 Nov 2014

A polling station was set up in a school in CitŽ Tadamoune, Tunis.

Thumb sm
Tunisia elections 08
Tunis, Tunisia
By Adeline Bailleul
22 Nov 2014

A young man shows purple ink on his finger, a sign that he voted.

Thumb sm
Tunisia elections 09
Tunis, Tunisia
By Adeline Bailleul
22 Nov 2014

A polling station was set up in a school of CitŽ Tadamoune in Tunis.

Thumb sm
Tunisia elections 01
Tunis, Tunisia
By Adeline Bailleul
22 Nov 2014

Tunisians rush to a polling center in the suburbs of Tunis to vote in the country's presidential elections.

Thumb sm
Tunisia elections 02
Tunis, Tunisia
By Adeline Bailleul
22 Nov 2014

Tunisians wait for the opening of the polling station.

Frame 0004
2014 Presidential elections in Tunisia
Tunis
By Adeline Bailleul
24 Nov 2014

Raw footage of the polling stations in Tunis during Tunisia's first presidential election since a new constitution was adopted in January 2014.

With a voter turnout around 64 percent, this election marks the country's first democratic transition of power. Over 80,000 servicemen were deployed to ensure safety at polling stations, where voting went fairly smoothly throughout the day.

Beji Caid Essebsi of the secular Nida Tounes is expected to emerge on top, with Moncef Marzouki of the moderate Islamist Ennahda party following close behind. However, at the close of polling, no candidate seemed likely to have enough votes to win outright, in which case a run-off would take place in December.

Official results are expected to be released Wednesday.

Frame 0004
Tunisian Elections 2014 : The Revolut...
Tunis
By Adeline Bailleul
29 Oct 2014

ROUGH CUT / INTERVIEWS + RUSHES

With whispers of revolutionary ideals still on the lips of its disenchanted youth, Tunisia went to the polls to elect its parliament on Sunday, October 26. Tunisia’s electoral body announced that the provisional turnout was 60 %. The final results are expected on Wednesday.

Beyond the massive gatherings of political parties and campaigns that have bombarded the streets, a large category of Tunisians chose to not participate in the elections.

Nabila, Sonia, Mohammed and Nadhim are all activists in Tunisia. They decided to boycott the elections even though they were among the first to call for democracy during the Tunisian uprising. They all called for a boycott on the elections to resist attempts by the political class to derail their revolution, to distract people from its real objectives and goals.

There are indeed a fair number of Tunisians equally disappointed with the country’s democratic transition. Among them are the families of the martyrs of the revolution who gathered on Avenue Bourguiba on October 22 to vocalize their discontent with a transitional justice process that, from their perspective, has been blocked by the whole of the political class.

For them, most of the issues that triggered the revolution remain: police impunity; unemployment; inequality; and the lack of justice, dignity and hope. They decided to fight against what they see as a the continuity of tyranny.