melaniewenger Melanie Wenger

Mélanie Wenger is currently working on the aftermaths of the libyan conflict. She is reporting on the different issues remaining after the end of the war, such as the presence of guns in the daily life of Libyans, the unresolved Taouerga refugee problem, and also the civilian victims of the NATO strikes still fighting to be acknowledged as such, for an explanation, a compensation or even an answer from their government or NATO itself. Part of these reports were part of an investigation project launched by Mélanie Wenger and Aurélie Moreau, supported by the « Fonds pour le journalisme de la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles », a Belgian journalism fund. Her photographic reports about Libya have been published by the newspaper La Libre Belgique in april 2013 (you can find the whole project on the fund website : http://www.fondspourlejournalisme.be/objectif-kadhafi/ and on the project website : www.objectif- kadhafi.be) and the follow up of the issue is to be published by Mediapart in march 2014. This work is going to be exhibited in the First Photography Festival of Libya, in Yphren, in Jully 2014, a festival also welcoming Josef Koudelka and supported by the Libyan Ministry of Culture. She has also been reporting on the last nomadic people in Europe, the Sami people, also called Laplanders. These reindeers breeders live between Russia, Finland and Norway. She focused on their lifestyle based on customs, living in an unfriendly environment and giving an important place to nature. Mélanie has also been working on local breaking news in France and Belgium for 2 years, she daily works with the press photo agencies Photo News and Reuters and Gamma and has been published in several newspapers such as La Libre Belgique, Le Vif/L'Express, De Standaard, De Morgen, Le Monde... Mélanie obtained her Master in Photojournalism and Magazine Press in IHECS School of Brussels with the congratulations thanks to her photographic work on the Madagascar putsch. She also have a Licence in journalism from the University of Brussels (ULB). She did a few internships as a press photographer for the newspaper La Libre Belgique and the news agency Photonews, she has been working daily as a freelance photographer for two years juggling between reports abroad and daily news in Belgium.

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Libya's Lost Generation
tripoli
By Melanie Wenger
30 Mar 2014

As Libya celebrates the 3rd anniversary of its revolution, a young generation of Libyans are continuing to fight for their dreams as hope for a bright future, away from guns, theft and radicalism, fades. Young Libyans who took up arms to fight the Gadhafi regime now find their country plunged into a deep political and economic crisis that trapping many in a cycle of violence and greed.

Media created

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Libya's Lost Generation 1
By Melanie Wenger
15 Feb 2014

Mariam (20), Mahdea (26) and Ajaeeb (35) are sisters who were injured in the bombing of their house in Majer. They just came back from three years of treatment and surgeries in Germany. There are no facilities adapted to handicapped people in their little village, one hour away by car from Misrata. Trapped in their own homes now, they don't see any future for themselves, considering it unlikely for them to find a job, have a husband and raise a family.

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Libya's Lost Generation 9
By Melanie Wenger
20 Feb 2014

On February 20th, the day of the Constitution assembly elections, the Imazighen declared their autonomy and gathered in their main city, Zwara. At the end of a men-only demonstration, young women were allowed to join and light some candles. They were complaining that their people were not included in the elections and want the central government and parliament to guarantee their language and culture in Libya's planned constitution.

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Libya's Lost Generation 10
By Melanie Wenger
02 Oct 2012

Hassan, who is a member of the Al-Jazeera militia based in Ajdabiya, sits in the main office of the katiba (batallion) on chairs found in one of Gadhafi's houses. With his fellow fighters, he used to protect the oil fields in the desert from Gaddafi's troops and other thieves during the revolution.
They have been fighting in the South and gaining control over the oil fields' areas ever since. It is not clear, however, whether they are protecting the oil from thieves or exporting it illegally from the refineries on the coast they control from Ajdabiya to Ras Lanuf.

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Libya's Lost Generation 11
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

A young boy visits a little museum shows the pictures of 30 people wounded and killed by a NATO strike in Majer where he used to live. The family is still fighting in court to obtain compensation that would help them build a new home.

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Libya's Lost Generation 12
By Melanie Wenger
15 Feb 2014

Najim Al-Morabit, 14, is coming back for the first time in his old home in Zliten, where he lost his mother and two brothers. Traumatized by the bombing, he sees a psychiatrist every week in Misrata without the knowledge of his family as he doesn't want to be considered crazy.

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Libya's Lost Generation 13
By Melanie Wenger
14 Feb 2014

A few women demonstrate in a female-only area during a protest against the extension of the Congress' mandate in Benghazi's Liberty Square.

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Libya's Lost Generation 14
By Melanie Wenger
10 Feb 2014

The children from the Al-Gharari family have witnessed their uncles and aunts die when the family house was struck by the NATO. Their father is still fighting the NATO and the Libyan government in court for compensation for the loss of their family house where three generations had been living together. The children say that their grandparents "died of sorrow" three months ago.

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Libya's Lost Generation 7
By Melanie Wenger
28 Feb 2014

Sifaw plays Amazigh music in gatherings to promote his culture in the different cities of eastern Libya as part of his peaceful work for the Amazigh cause. His culture, he insists, is quite different from the Arab culture. During the revolution, Sifaw used to fight against Gadhafi with his fellows from Yefren, and now carries a Kalachinkov with him to protect his family from the rising insecurity, home invasions and car hijacking in Libya.

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Libya's Lost Generation 2
By Melanie Wenger
05 Oct 2012

Amia, 15, stays inside her refugee camp in Janzur, Tripoli instead of going back to school where she fears that she will be bullied again. She was forced to flee her home in Tawergha as the Misrata militias attacked her home town, accusing its population of being pro-Gadhafi in the final days of the revolution. Many young girls have been attacked, burned and tortured by Misrata militias.

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Wasted young Libya 11
By Melanie Wenger
24 Sep 2012

As insecurity blights Tripoli, Corinthia Hotel - like other hotels in the city - employs a katiba (batallion) of a militia to be in charge of security. Militias (affiliated with Libya Dawn), whose work at hotels grants them access to important business places for gun and drug trafficking, are considered the only reliable armed groups since the army consists of young, underpaid soldiers. "When there is trouble, they don't get involved. Their pay is not worth their lives," explains a member of one of the militias. The government provides any militia member with around $700, which is about $300 more than the average salary in Libya.

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Libya's Lost Generation 4
By Melanie Wenger
16 Feb 2014

Before the revolution, Younis was a touristic guide. Tourists from Europe stopped coming to Libya when the revolution started, so Younis tries to make a living by guiding the few English-speaking journalists who visit Libya occasionally for reports. Since he gave up fighting, he sometimes meets with his old fellow fighters to have fun and "shoot a little" in Farwa Islands near Zwara, an isolated and deserted place where they can "blow off the steam and not lose it."

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Libya's Lost Generation 5
By Melanie Wenger
21 Feb 2014

Songwriter, guitarist and death metal fan Ousman Ben Khalifa prefers to play only Amazigh songs in his few concerts in Libya. « Sharia people, they think metal music is a Satanic music against religion. Honestly, I do not know how things will end if I try to play [death metal] so I just avoid playing it in public places. It's not safe to play metal music in Libya." Ousama is hoping to leave Libya and is now filing for a Canadian visa so he can study and hopefully find a job there.

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Libya's Lost Generation 6
By Melanie Wenger
05 Oct 2012

Young guys hanging out in an abandoned part of a military academy in Janzur, Tripoli. Many young people come to this deserted area to hang out, fix old cars and practise car drifting. To make a living, they get involved in all sorts of trafficking such as goods for the Tawarghan camp, drugs, stolen cars, etc. Since the Libyan army is still getting put together, some parts of the Academy remain unoccupied.

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Taouergas: Damned Souls of the Libyan...
Taouerga, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

The city of Taouerga is now a ghost city hanted by Misrati militias. All burned and robbed, only some walls are still standing, showing the testimony of hatred. Called now the New Misrata, the city is not easy to access, totally controlled, and no journalist is allowed.

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Taouergas: Damned Souls of the Libyan...
Taouerga, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

The city of Taouerga is now a ghost city hanted by Misrati militias. All burned and robbed, only some walls are still standing, showing the testimony of hatred. Called now the New Misrata, the city is not easy to access, totally controlled, and no journalist is allowed.

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Taouergas: Damned Souls of the Libyan...
Janzur, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
26 Sep 2012

One of the Taouerga camps is situated in Janzur. 400 families are living in approximately 1km2, in the military academy where one of Gaddafi’s sons used to study . The electricity power has recently been back thanks to generators shared by some «residents». Some windows are still missing, replaced by blankets or sheets.

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Taouergas: Damned Souls of the Libyan...
Janzur, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
05 Oct 2012

New Taouerga families await, fleeing the camp outside Misrata constantly under attack. The remaining men use plywood to divide the basement of one of the buildings to make room for them.

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Taouergas: Damned Souls of the Libyan...
Janzur, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
05 Oct 2012

A few nights ago, the Misrata militias attacked the camp again, taking men and humiliating them in front of the children, and breaking windows and walls. A couple were killed, trying to flee. A young girl was found raped, her breast burned.

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Taouergas: Damned Souls of the Libyan...
Janzur, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
05 Oct 2012

In one of the storage racks, some women settled a little kitchen shared by the 30 families of one of the buildings. Two pots and one pan are available along with two electrical hobs. Some spices and cans were brought in a few months back by the remaining NGOs. Water from the lavatories and natural light do the trick for cooking.

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Taouergas: Damned Souls of the Libyan...
Janzur, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
26 Sep 2012

A new school has been founded by the remaining teachers of Taouerga. Public workers still receiving their paycheck, use it to gather old books, pens, papers, and smuggling food into the camp to create little shops, and new types of trade, like the fridge store which stores perishable goods, and the charger store for cellphones.

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Taouergas: Damned Souls of the Libyan...
Janzur, Tripoli
By Melanie Wenger
05 Oct 2012

Eïma is dreaming to go back to her city. In february, some of the Taouerga people went out of the camp to demonstrate and ask for their city back, but the militias opened fire on the demonstrators. Taouerga people are still considered as pro-Gaddafi and therefore discriminated.

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Taouergas: Damned Souls of the Libyan...
Janzur, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
26 Sep 2012

Some men leave the camp to go to work and provide for their family. A few trucks come into the camp in the morning, using cheap workforce for construction sites. But some of them get abducted outside. According to the chief of Misrata militias, they got arrested and are supposed to be in prison. No trace was found of the majority of them.

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Taouergas: Damned Souls of the Libyan...
Janzour, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

Taouerga city is situated 30km from Misrata, it was the city of the black-skin Libyans, off-springs of the last slaves. The fight between the two cities goes way back, before the revolution. But since then, Taouergas are held responsible for helping the Gaddafi’s militias during the revolution against Misrata. Since the 8th of August 2011, the Misrata militias control the ghost city, burned to the ground and empty. Nobody is allowed in, even journalists. At the entrance, a board announces the «New Misrata». We made this picture by entering covertly, finally chased by militias, who arrested some of our colleagues a few months ago.

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Taouergas: Damned Souls of the Libyan...
Janzur, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
05 Oct 2012

Chaimza is 16 years old, she fled Taouerga, with her family. Lost her brother in the exodus in April 2011. Her father, brother, sisters, grand-mother and grand-father live in a room divided by sheets for intimacy.

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Taouergas: Damned Souls of the Libyan...
Tripoli, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
26 Sep 2012

These ladies, gathered in a room enlightened by one and only window, tell the story of the exodus, as they look at some pictures of their city. A lot of them refuse to be seen, for fear of retaliation by the Misratis.

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NATO Strike Aftermath in Libya 15
Tripoli, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
27 Sep 2012

5 deaths inside the family Al-Gharari in Libyan Souk al-Juma, Tripoli.

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NATO Strike Aftermath in Libya 14
Zliten, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

3 death inside the family of Mustafa al-Morabit in Zliten, Libya.

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NATO Strike Aftermath in Libya 13
Zliten, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

5 deaths inside the family of Al-Gharari in Libyan Souk al-Juma, Tripoli.

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NATO Strike Aftermath in Libya 12
Zliten, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

3 deaths inside the family of Mustafa al-Morabit, Zliten, Libya.

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NATO Strike Aftermath in Libya 11
Majer, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

4 deaths within the family of Mohamed Al-Jarhoud, Majer, Lybia.

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NATO Strike Aftermath in Libya 10
Zliten, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

3 deaths inside the family of Mustafa al-Morabit, Zliten, Libya.

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NATO Strike Aftermath in Libya 9
Majer, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

4 deaths including a eight-month-old baby within the family of Mohamed Al-Jarhoud, Majer, Libya.

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NATO Strike Aftermath in Libya 8
Zliten, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

3 deaths inside the family of Mustafa al-Morabit in Zliten, Libya.

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NATO Strike Aftermath in Libya 7
Majer, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

14 deaths and 17 wounded members within the family of Ali Hamid Gafez in Majer, Libya.

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NATO Strike Aftermath in Libya 6
Majer, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

14 deaths and 17 wounded members of Ali Hamid Gafez's family in Majer, Libya.

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NATO Strike Aftermath in Libya 5
Majer, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

14 deaths and 17 wounded members of Ali Hamid Gafez's family in Majer, Libya.

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NATO Strike Aftermath in Libya 4
Majer, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

36 deaths and 32 wounded members within Al-Jarud and Gafez families in Majer, Libya.

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NATO Strike Aftermath in Libya 3
Majer, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

14 deaths and 17 wounded members within the family of Ali Hamid Gafez in Majer, Libya.