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Trailing the Mughals 20
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
26 Feb 2015

A classic scene of a man sitting on the pavement in front of a statue celebrating a divinity.

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Trailing the Mughals 21
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
26 Feb 2015

On Jodphur streets, two hermaphrodites are wandering in the old souk after celebrating the Holi in which colored vegetable powder is spread on devotees. In India, hermaphrodites or hijras are part of one of the most neglected groups of our society.

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Trailing the Mughals 16
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
24 Feb 2015

Hawa Mahal is made of rare sand stone, that is a classic regional stone used to built the main monuments of Northern India. It is impressive to wander inside the palace and to take a look at the city for the tiny windows that were once the only way for women to connect with the city life.
Hawa Mahal or Palace of Winds is a palace in Jaipur. It is so named because it was essentially a high screen wall built so the women of the royal household could observe street festivities while unseen from the outside. Constructed of red and pink sandstone, the palace sits on the edge of the City Palace, and extends to the zenana, or women's chambers.

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Trailing the Mughals 01
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
24 Feb 2015

In 1928, Narayan Niwas hotel Jaipur was erected by General Amar Singh, Thakur of Kanota, a confidant of Maharaja Sawai Man Singh and Commander of the erstwhile Jaipur State Force. It was named after his father, Thakur Narain Singh. The palace was used as a country residence by him, which he used for staying during his hunting expeditions and family vacations. It has now been turned into a heritage hotel in Jaipur, which is managed by the Kanota Family.
The picture of the Maharajah is a classic posture of the grandiose Era of the former rules of India.

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Trailing the Mughals 12
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
23 Feb 2015

One of the highlights of a visit to the stunning Amer Fort is the elephant ride up the hill to the main entrance. These venerated animals are decorated with traditional painted patterns and effortlessly transport visitors up the steep slope to the fort.

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Trailing the Mughals 13
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
23 Feb 2015

Amber Fort is a city that was ruled by raja man Singh. It is a perfect example of a Hindu style fort. Wide ramparts, carved gates and cobbled paths of the fort overlooks the Maota Lake.
The palace was lived in by the Rajput Maharajas and their families. At the entrance to the palace near the fort’s Ganesh Gate, there is also a temple dedicated to Sila Devi, a goddess of the Chaitanya cult which was given to Raja Man Singh when he had defeated the Raja of Jessore, Bengal in 1604.
At the Amber Fort, musicians play traditional India music and there is a restaurant overlooking the city that serves amazing regional food in the evening.

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Trailing the Mughals 14
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
23 Feb 2015

Savoury snacks are popular in India. They can be found at each corner of the city. Bhelpuri is a savoury Indian snack, and is also a type of chaat. It is made out of puffed rice, vegetables and a tangy tamarind sauce. Bhelpuri is thought to have originated within the Gucafes and street food stalls of Mumbai, and the recipe has spread to most parts of India where it has been modified to suit local food availability. It is also said to be originated from Bhadang, a spicy namkeen from Western Maharashtra.

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Trailing the Mughals 15
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
23 Feb 2015

Tourists are invited to visit textile workshops that are spread in the old city. Hand prints is the landmark of Jaipur City. Sober, low toned colors and delicate lines, creating finer designs like the poppy, rose and lotus, usually against a white background, are well known characteristic of fabrics that are printed at Sanganer. While the motifs are conventionally big and bold in Bagru, with the dabu (resist-printing) and the dyeing process producing a reddish black shade- with wild flowers, buds and foliage providing inspiration to the printers of Bagru.Legend has it that it was probably towards the end of the 17th century that this art form developed here. Thanks to the constant wars with the Mughals and Marathas, many printers migrated from Gujarat to Rajasthan. Under the royal patronage, by the end of the 18th century this industry was fully developed in Sanganer. Dyeing of Jaipur Printed Cloth is by use of vegetable colors.

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Trailing the Mughals 10
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
22 Feb 2015

The column has craving from different civilisation influence such as Hindu, Persian, Christian, Buddhist and Jain.
The city of Fatehpur Sikri was founded in 1569 by the Mughal emperor Akbar and served as the capital of the Mughal Empire from 1571 to 1585. After his military victories over Chittor and Ranthambore, Akbar decided to move his capital from Agra to a Fatehpur in order to honor the Sufi Salim Chishti. Here he commenced the construction of a planned walled city. He supervised the construction of a series of royal palaces, harems, courts, a mosque and many other facilities. The city's name means victorious

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Trailing the Mughals 11
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
22 Feb 2015

A duo of young boys playing traditional India music. The dancer boy is dressed like a girl to attract tourists.The musician is playing the sitar. The sitar is a plucked stringed instrument used mainly in Hindustani music and Indian classical music. The instrument is believed to have been derived from the veena, an ancient Indian instrument, which was modified by a Mughal court musician to conform with the tastes of his Persian patrons and named after a Persian instrument called the Setar.

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Trailing the Mughals 08
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
21 Feb 2015

Cycling is one of the most popular modes of transport in India. It is powered by man and doesn't require any additional cost. That is the reason why in this emergent country, a great number of people use their bicycle to commute.

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Trailing the Mughals 09
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
21 Feb 2015

Indians are proud of their most impressive castle, the Taj Mahal. It is also the most romantic story in India history.The crown of palaces is a white marble mausoleum located in Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India. Commissioned in 1632 by the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan to house the worldly remains of his third wife, Mumtaz Mahal. His loss was terrible and he was in a great depression. Shah Jahan spent 20 years supervising the work of his late wife's Mausoleum. The Taj Mahal stands on the southern bank of the Yamuna River. The mausoleum is widely recognized as "the jewel of Muslim art in India" and remains as one of the world’s most celebrated structures and a symbol of India’s rich history.
This is a perfect example of Mughal architecture, a perfect blend of elements from Islamic, Persian, Ottoman Turkish as well as Indian style.

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Trailing the Mughals 02
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

The great mosque of Old Delhi is the largest in India, with a courtyard capable of holding 25,000 devotees. Built in 1644, it is one of the greatest achievements of the architectural extravagance of Shah Jahan, the Mughal emperor who built the Taj Mahal and the Red Fort. In order to enter the Friday Mosque tourists are asked to wear a special gown handed over at the entrance and to visit the Mosque barefoot. The mosque is a gathering point for Indian families and devotees who flock to pray there from all over India.

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Trailing the Mughals 03
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

Chandni Chowk is Delhi's most famous and exciting bazaar. The "moonlit square" or "moonlit market", is one of the oldest and busiest markets in Old Delhi, now in central north Delhi, India. Built in the 17th century by the Mughal Emperor of India, Shah Jahan, and designed by his daughter Jahan Ara, the market was once divided by canals to reflect the moonlight. It remains one of India's largest wholesale markets. It is exciting to stroll around its alleyways and to discover the tiny shops selling food, textile and jewels.

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Trailing the Mughals
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

Street vendor selling Bhel puri, one of the most common all-day snacks in northern India: a crunchy, cold, sweet-and-sour mix of puffed rice, sev, chopped onion, potato and tamarind chutney. It has to be mixed and eaten on the spot, and most vendors will concoct their own variations.

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Trailing the Mughals 05
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

The feet of a rickshaw driver. With his own strength, he pulls up to three clients at a time. Though rapidly being replaced by motorized three-wheeled rickshaws, the bicycle rickshaw still has a strong presence in much of Old Delhi.

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Trailing the Mughals 06
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

This is a typical column in Qutab Minar monument. Qutab Minar is 73m high "victory tower" built in 1193 by Qutab-ud-din Aibak immediately after he defeated Delhi's last Hindu kingdom. At the foot of the tower is the Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque. It is the very first mosque that was built in India. Qutab-ud-din Aibak, the first Muslim ruler of Delhi, began construction of the Qutab Minar in 1200 AD. The unfinished monument was then completed by his successor, Iltutmush who added three more stories. It was not only 1368 that Firoz Shah Tughlak erected the fifth and the last storey.

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Trailing the Mughals 07
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

Paras Komar, a Bihar marble-stone craftsman, showcases his trade at Handicrafts Museum in Delhi, India.

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Villains, Goblins and Ghouls: Cairo's...
Cairo
By Lewis
15 Feb 2015

February 7, 2015
Cairo, Eygpt

Cosplay, a portmanteau of costume and play, emerged as a popular hobby in Japan during the 1990s and quickly became a symbol of Japanese popular culture across Asia and the US. Borrowing stylistic elements of anime, comics, and gaming culture, cosplayers take on the appearance of their favorite fictional characters.

In recent months, the activity has gained significant traction in Egypt, spawning small communities from Mansoura to Alexandria and Cairo. As the 2nd edition of EgyCon commences this weekend, we will be looking at the people sharing in this new-found identity. EgyCon is the name of the cosplay convention series in Egypt whose main goal is to spread anime and manga culture throughout the country. But as Egyptian youth blur the border between fantasy and reality, what are the social impacts and challenges of engaging in cosplay in a country marked by social conservatism, growing unemployment, and political instability?

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Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

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Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

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Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

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Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

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Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

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Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

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Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

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Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

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Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

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Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

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Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

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Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

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Body and Space: 'Contact' Improvisati...
Goa, India
By Nikhil Bhowmick
31 Jan 2015

The story of contact is unique in its genre. This movement-based art form, offers an experience that may challenge the performer to redefine his physical space, his self-awareness, and simply experience a deep connection with him or herself and others. Brought to India in the past few years, it has experienced an invigorating support by the Indian dance community. The Goa Contact festival, which takes place every year, gives away thirty plus scholarships for Indian dance students and dancers to further their awareness about Contact.
Erica Kaufman is one of the leading figures of Contact since the eighties. As a dancer, contact artist and yogini, she has extensively researched the ins and outs of physical movement across continents. While Erica gives us a brief definition of all the possibilities that could be contact, we also follow Lional Lishoy, a young actor, contact artist, music composer and dancer from Kerala, living in Bangalore, who is here as one of the scholarship trustees of the festival. Lional has gained the support of many from the international Contact community to become an anchor for contact practitioners in Bangalore, where it has emerged as an "alternative" art form.
His commentary is about his journey through contact, and what he expects out of it.

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Thaipusam 02
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
31 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Thaipusam 05
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
31 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Racy Egyptian Films Persist in the Fa...
Beirut
By Cherine Yazbeck
29 Jan 2015

Beirut, Lebanon

January 29, 2015

After the death of Arab film icons Faten Hamama and Sabah earlier this year, cinema fans revived the memories of what many describe as “la belle époque,” which dated from the 1950s till the mid-1970s.

During this golden age, budgets and standards were considerably high and the progressive state ideology promoted the production of films that were successful throughout the Arab world. This wave benefited from cultural interaction between different Arab societies, a seemingly endless cache of amazing talents and the blessing of a dedicated audience. More significantly, movies reflected liberal societies.

Aboudi Abu Jaoudeh, the director of Al-Furat publishing house, is a collector of Arab film posters. Through this collection, one can understand the prevailing mentality at that time. He explains that since the mid-1970s, filmmakers have steered away from showing explicit content as a result of pressure from producers from the Arabian Gulf.

A recent audiovisual performance titled Gharam wa Intiqam (Love and Revenge), designed by artist Randa Mirza and rapper Wael Kodaih, known as Rayess Beik, revives Arab cinema’s golden era. The show, which is still running in alternative venues, incorporates electronic music into scenes from some of the most iconic Egyptian, Lebanese, and Syrian movies.

This video includes an interview with Sadek Sabbah, a famous Lebanese cinema producer and distributor of Egyptian and Lebanese movies whose company, Sabbah Art Production, was a main contributor of cinematic production in the 1960s and 1970s. He analyses how social change in Egypt has affected the movies and discusses the influence of Islamists on public freedom in Egypt.

Shotlist and Transcript

1 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Abboudi Abou Jawdeh, Director of Al-Furat Publishing House
00:00 – 01:17
I am focusing my interest on Lebanese cinema. I want to archive [the relevant material] accurately.
I love this poster. It features Sabah. Many posters were inspired by Western ones. This one was shows an influence of the movie Gilda, starred by Rita Hayworth. They have reproduced the exact same poster in Lebanon.
When James Bond movies were out, there were spy movies in Lebanon, too. When musical films were produced abroad, musicals were also produced [in Lebanon]. The same trends that appeared in the 1970s… When erotic movies were produced, the same took place in Arab countries and Lebanon between 1970 and 1972 or 1973. The same trends in world or Arab cinema were echoed [in Lebanon]. These trends had a worldwide effect. This includes all aspects [of cinema], from designing poster to producing the movie. This also affected people’s lives.

2 Various of Abboudi Abou Jawdeh examining posters

3 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Abboudi Abou Jawdeh, Director of Al-Furat Publishing House

01:31 – 08:18

01:31
This movie… this poster dates from the 1940s. This is how they designed posters.
In the 1970s and 1980s – the late 1970s and early 1980s – especially when video and new technology appeared, people were able to take movies to their homes. At that time, funding from Saudi Arabia or the Gulf in general was channeled into production. This funding forced its own requirements on production. It imposed certain limits. There was a large-scale consumption of cinematic work, or movies in general, through new broadcasting media; there were new TV stations as well as video.
This financial capital bought a large part of old movies and financed new movies. It laid down new models for work. For example, [investors] require that certain scenes or topics do not appear. There were certain molds that had to contain these movies. Movies that were produced until the 1970s were modified to suit the new display rules. All the kisses were removed from movies, as well as all scenes that were deemed unacceptable. Movies that are being currently shown and that were produced in 1950s, 1960s and 1970s are disfigured.
It was a rare for a director to be able to take control of his own movie. Even earlier, in the 1950s and 1960s, there were directors who suffered in their work and their movies were even censored. They used to be paid per movie. They would receive a certain fee, for example 6,000 or 7,000 Egyptian pounds and would not ask about the movie later. Some producers were in need of money.
I started collecting… one usually has a favorite actor or actresses. I started collecting their photos and posters. After the show, I used to ask workers in the movie theater if there were any posters [that I could take]. I started collecting posters of Western movies. I continued this collection, and later I was interested in cinema magazines, especially in the 1970s… in the early 1970s. Cinema was the main source of entertainment in Lebanon at that time. People from all social classes used to go at least five or six times a year to the movie theater.
When she [Um Kulthum] died, they filmed her funeral and showed part of that footage [in the cinema].
Al-Haram (The Sin) was a movie produced in 1968. It was based on a novel by Youssef Idriss. It is a beautiful story about a female peasant who was a raped by another peasant and did not dare to say anything about it. She did not even tell her husband about this. She died while giving birth. This story is very tragic and can really be described as a story with a social interest. It shows women’s suffering in our Arab societies.
The changes… now there are restrictions that actors, directors, or producers apply to avoid being held accountable. It is not the people who would hold them accountable. [A producer would say,] “I have paid one or two million dollars to produce a TV series; I do not want the government to ban it if I did not remove this or that part.” Producers avoid any trouble to be able to make a profit.
06:42
This poster was designed by artist Hilmi al-Touni. I think that it expresses very beautifully what the movie is about. All the black color… the background represents death while she represents life. The movie’s illustration is done beautifully.
07: 13
Look at this poster. Imagine that this poster was printed in 1955. This is one of the first movies starred by Hind Rustom.
This kind of magazines was printed in Lebanon in 1960s and even in the 1970s. This magazine was distributed in Arab countries. It is called Cinema and Marvels. It was indeed a marvelous magazine!
Interviewer: Do you think it would be possible for such magazines to be printed again in the Arab world?
- No, it is not possible. Some of [these models] were Arab. You would be able to find Arab dancers on magazine covers. It was normal.

4 Various of Metro al-Madina theatre hall and cabaret

5 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Randa Mirza, Artist
08:44
“Our show is called Love and Revenge, the title of a movie starred by Asmahan in 1944. The entire show is based on replaying Arabic songs that date from the 1930s till the 1960s. It features Egyptian, Lebanese and Syrian movies from the same period.“

  1. Various of show. NAT Sound: Music.

7 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Rayyes Beik, Musician
09:25
“I wanted to revive these songs with a new spirit so that I and other people rediscover them. In remixing these songs, I incorporated electronic music. I changed the beat and the length of the songs. The song now has a new face, a new spirit.”

  1. SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Randa Mirza, Artist
    09:55
    “When we return to that era, we realize that we had a great cinematographic and musical production, which had simplicity, aesthetics and experience that now have been lost. We want to bring this era back. Then we would perhaps be able to say, “See where we were and where we are now.”

9 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Rayyes Beik, Musician and Rapper
10:20
“There is a political, economic and artic void. There is a big void in the Arab world.”

10 Wide of posters in Metro al-Madina

11 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Aurelien Zouki, Spectator
10:40
It is really important that they worked on Egyptian movies. This shows our situation back then and what we have now reached. This difference is a bit scary.

12 Various of show. Scenes taken from Kaborya, starred by Ahmadn Zaki and Raghda (9:14).
Scenes feature dancer Tahiya Karioka. Soundtrack , song by Warda al-Jazairiya (11:08); Dancer Samia Jamal (11:39); scenes from film Abi Fawqa al-Shajara, starred by Abdel Halim Hafez and Samia Jamal; soundtrack, Tindam by Widad; film starred by Sleiman Eid

13 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Sadeq Sabbah, Owner of Sabbah Art Production
15:11 – 18:36

I think the change is due to the fact that people’s mindset was affected by the Islamic tide. Part of this was negative. This negative part affected people. It affected their social habits and way of life, which has to do with cinema, what they eat or drink, as well as going out. It has to do with everything. It is not specifically related to cinema. If, in Lebanon for example, I wanted to say that cinema is the mirror of society… I feel that cinema currently is not the mirror of society. If you look at 10 women in the street, you will see that nine of them wear the hijab. However, if we looked at women in Egyptian movies, the ratio would be reversed. Maybe one tenth of them wear a hijab.
Lebanon embraced Egyptian cinema approximately from 1965 to 1975. They [Egyptian filmmakers] discovered three things in Lebanon. First of all, Lebanon is a large studio where there is great scenery. There is the sea, mountains and a nice climate. Media services in Lebanon were – and still are – very distinguished. Egyptians discovered that film production was easy in Lebanon. In addition to that, there were Lebanese actors and actresses present in Lebanon, which complemented Egyptian cinema. More importantly, distribution originated in Lebanon. The distribution revenues were funneled into Lebanon, which created an economic cycle during these 10 years. This facilitated film production. I feel nostalgic about the movie Nagham fi Hayati (A Life Melody), starred by Farid al-Atrash. First of all, I followed my parents work while they produced this movie. Secondly, there was a horrible incident. Farid al-Atrash died during two days before the end of filming, but they [the crew] were able to come up with solutions. It might also have to do with the fact that this was the last movie made in Lebanon – we were talking about these movies made between 1965 and 1975. After that the war broke out. I always have this movie in mind and I always love to watch it. Also, It featured a large group of Lebanese actors, such as Shoushou. There was a large Lebanese cast in this movie. It also featured classical scenery in Lebanon, such as Baalbek, Byblos, the cable cart, which was very important back then. It also featured Tyre. It was as if there Egyptian cinema was bidding Lebanon farewell.

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Thaipusam 09
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
29 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Thaipusam 10
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
29 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Thaipusam 11
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
29 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Thaipusam 12
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
29 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Thaipusam 13
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
29 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.