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Iraqi Soldiers Abandon Syrian Border
By mushtaq mohammed
01 Jul 2014

Iraqi soldiers hiding near the Al-Ukhaider Fortress, 50km south of Karbala, having been ordered to retreat from the Syrian border. On the way to supply the border patrol with aid, Sayed Mohammad al-Talkani, the representative of Muqtada al-Sadr, and Iraqi Member of Parliament, Fatm al Kreiti, found 2,500 soldiers sheltering in the archaeological site. They lacked food and water; many of them suffered from starvation and some had become sick and died. When asked why they retreated they said that they received orders from the officers, with no reason given, to abandon their posts and were told to leave the border open for ISIL to enter and seize the abandoned weapons left there.

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ISIL Destroys Ancient Monuments in Ra...
Raqqa, Syria
By TTM Contributor 29
24 Apr 2014

April 26, 2014
Raqqa, Syria

The Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), has destroyed historical monuments of two lions in al-Rasheed Garden in central Raqqa.
The monuments are symbols of the Tell Halaf culture which flourished in the 10th century BC in northeastern Syria.

ISIL took over Raqqa province in mid January, 2014. Since then, many archeological sites are reported to have been destroyed by the extremist group.

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Taking Shelter in an Archeological Si...
By Transterra Editor
05 Apr 2014

Video shot on April 5, 2014, in Serjilla, Rural Idleb, Syria

Shows Syrian refugees originally from Kfaroumeh, Rural Idleb, who have fled the civil war and taken shelter in the Archeological site of Serjilla, one of the best preserved of the Dead Cities in northwestern Syria. It is located in the Jabal al Zawiya, between the Provinces of Hama and Aleppo.
About 150 families live in Archeological remains that were built in the year 473 during the time of Christianity. Electricity and water do not exist refugees say, however the geological nature of the site and the cellars are keeping them safe from the airstrikes and shelling of the government forces.

Hannoud al Barhoumi, is a mother from Kfaroumeh. Four of her children fought with the FSA and died in battles against government forces. She fled her village with her grandchildren. She is now living in a room in the archeological site. A man from Homs provided her with some goods that she sells for living.

Shot list:
- Various shots of the Archeological site - Various shots of Hannoud al Barhoumi and her Family in archeological site - Interview with Hannoud al Barhoumi - Various shots of a family in cellar - Interview with Mohamad Abu Maamoun - Refugee from Kfaroumeh - Various shots of animals in archeological site - various shots of children in archeological site - Interview with Khaled Satouf - Bedouin from Kfaroumeh, refuged after the dead of his mother and father - Interview with Abu Ahmad - Refugee from Kfaroumeh - Various shots of Abu Ahmad and his family in archeological site

Transcription:

Hannoud al Barhoumi-Refugee from :
I’m from Kfaroumeh, a mother of four martyrs, my name is Hanoud Al berro, I live here in Kfaroumeh, my four children died, one of them was the leader of a troop, Abdullah, he was a very important person and kfaroumeh as a whole was shaken by his death. When he used to arrive to the village everyone would say here comes Abed,what is he going to do, is he going to hit the check points and he never used to leave before he hits all of them. A clan came to Mardebsa so he took his troop and went there, he said he wouldn’t let the clan pass even if he has to die.

He was yelling Kfaroumeh men, on the 15th of march, shouting happily, a bomb shell hit him, he had 50 people in his troop, and lots of them said after Abed there’s no revolution, he was hit by a bomb shell that split his stomach in half from side to side.

I was sitting with my daughter and I told her; I don’t know what happened to me, I felt my heart was on fire and I want to go get some cold water, it was summer, I heared the mosque announcing that Abdo and Alwan died, my daughter ran to me and said both of my brothers died, I replied to her; what are you saying, meanwhile the imam of the mosque was repeating the names of the martyrs.

All I could say at that moment was “Allah Akbar”, that’s all I was able to say, I didn’t cry or anything just as I’m speaking to you right now.

Here we don’t have water nor electricity, we collect wood logs from the woods and from under the trees and we use them, we need them to warm milk for the little children and to cook, most children here are suffering from lice and rash, and pimples are appearing on their skin because of the dirt and the lack of water. There are snakes also, the children killed a very big snake two days ago. We’re living among snakes, spiders and scorpions. Our living conditions are very difficult, here in the woods and these areas but what can we do, all we can say is thank god and may he help us.

There’s a little store here, and thank god, good people are everywhere, I went to the store and talked to the owner and I explained my situation to him, I told him I don’t have anyone to support me but god and I have no resource and not even a job and I want to live, so he told me come and take whatever you want and sell it, so I started coming and going and getting stuff to sell them to kids.

Mohamad Ahmed Berro-Refugee from Kfaroumeh:
My full name is Mohammad Ahmed Berro, they call me Abu Maamoun and also the saw. We were in Kfaroumeh, shelling and firing was happening, our area ins a front line, so our houses were destroyed, so we had to run away and hide in the ruins, we use the caves that belong to the roman empire here to protect ourselves from the shooting and bombing, we’re only living because we’re not dead, we can’t do anything, we’re scared of everything, planes, tanks, artillery, barrel bombs, they’re firing everything at us, so we came here because it’s safer than the village, we hear firing but rarely, thank god. It’s been a few months since the last attack and we’re living here with our children somehow comfortably, we don’t have water, or electricity, look at the pimples on our skin because of a disease in the area.

Khaled Satoof Al badawi-Bedouin from Kfaroumeh, refuged after the dead of his mother and father:
My name is Khaled, Khaled Satoof Al badawi , we came here running away from the shooting and the shelling, and we built this room, we have no water, no electricity, we’re only living because we’re not dead, look at this living conditions, dogs can’t live this way, we went to the village, planes were firing and almost seven people died in Kfaroume, and houses were destroyed. Here we have a cave that we’re hiding in caves and the living circumstances are very difficult, we need medications, food but we have none, what we have here is flies, mice, scorpions and so many insects.

Abu Ahmad-Refugee from Kfaroumeh:
These ruins were inhabited ages ago, the caves that were used as graves in the ancient times were blocked so we had to clean them and reopen them, we tried to fix them as much as possible and we bared bugs, insects, wild animals and the bad weather, and we’re living thanks to god.

Approximately we’re 130-135 families here, there are women and children, we had a lot happening, death, marriage because life goes on.

We came here because of the artillery and the planes firing, we came here to the caves because the walls are bigger and thicker and anyhow god is protecting us, it’s still better than the village and better than walking in the street and getting shelled so we came here, most men here are just sitting and doing nothing in life.

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Dougga ruins
Dougga, Tunisia
By Sarah Mersch
13 Jul 2013

Roman arch at the historical site of Dougga, Tunisia

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Children who live in Shansharah ruins in the north-west of the country are acting as cadavers crawling out of the grave. When they arrived, families cleaned the graveyards of bones, foliage and detritus.

Les enfants qui vivent dans les ruines de Shansharah au nord-ouest du pays s’amusent à mimer la sortie des cadavres des tombeaux où ils vivent. Lorsqu’elles sont arrivées les familles ont nettoyé les caveaux de leurs ossements, feuillages et détritus.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Children who live in the Shansharah archeological site in the north-east have fun in the ruins. They lauch stones into the tall herbs where the insects live that transmit leshmania are. This skin disease devastates this rural region.

Les enfants qui vivent dans le site archéologique de Shansharah au nord-ouest du pays s’amusent dans les ruines. Ils en profitent pour lancer des cailloux dans les herbes hautes où se trouvent les insectes qui transmettent la leishmaniose, maladie de peau qui fait des ravages dans cette région rurale.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

It has been one year since the child refugees on the Shansharah archeological site in the Idlib region have gone to school. :Our school has been bombed by the army, we hope to start studying again when everything will be over."
Depuis un an les enfants réfugiés du site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb ne vont plus à l'école. « Notre école a été bombardée par l'armée, on espère retourner étudier quand tout se terminera ».

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

The children show an olive tree branch which they dry to add to some soup. The hundreds of displaced living on the Shansharah archeological site have very restricted access to food. Very few organizations assist them. Only the jihadist Ahrar el-Sham group provide a regular humanitarian help to them.
Les enfants montrent des branches d’oliviers dont ils font sécher les feuilles pour cuisiner de la soupe. Les centaines de déplacés vivant sur le site archéologique de Shansharah ont un accès restreint à la nourriture. Peu d’organisations les assistent. Seul le groupe djihadiste Arrar el Cham leur distribue une aide humanitaire régulière.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib Province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Entry of a graveyard occupied by a refugee family on the Shansharah archeological site, Idlib region. It has been one year since hundreds of displaced people have taken shelter in the ruins of these famous « dead cities » in the North-West. Far away from the surrounding cities, they are less exposed to the Syrian army air strikes.

Entrée d'un tombeau occupé par une famille réfugiée sur le site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb. Depuis un an des centaines de déplacés trouvent refuge dans les ruines des célèbres « villes mortes » du nord-ouest du pays. Eloignées des villes alentours, elles sont moins ciblées par les attaques aériennes de l'armée syrienne. Ici vit une famille de six personnes. La chambre funéraire est devenue leur lieu de vie.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Entry of a graveyard occupied by a refugee family on the Shansharah archeological site, Idlib region. It has been one year since hundreds of displaced people have taken shelter in the ruins of these famous « dead cities » in the North-West. Far away from the surrounding cities, they are less exposed to the Syrian army air strikes. The young Ahmad is complaining about the very hard living conditions of his daily life. There is no running water and electricity. « When it is raining we have to go out of the graveyard because it is full of water ».

Entrée d'un tombeau occupé par une famille réfugiée sur le site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb. Depuis un an des centaines de déplacés trouvent refuge dans les ruines des célèbres « villes mortes » du nord-ouest du pays. Eloignées des villes alentours, elles sont moins ciblées par les attaques aériennes de l'armée syrienne. Le petit Ahmad se plaint des conditions de vie déplorables dans lesquelles ils vivent. Ils ne disposent ni d'eau courante, ni d’électricité.
« Quand il pleut trop, nous sommes obligés de sortir car le tombeau se remplit d'eau ».

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

The refugees have put some tarp at the entry of the graveyard where they live on the Shansharah archeological site, Idlib region. Living conditions are extremely hard when the rain seeps into the graveyard. It has been one year that hundreds of displaced people are taking shelter in the ruins of these famous « dead cities » in the North-West. Far away from the surrounding cities, they are less exposed to the Syrian army air strikes.
Les réfugiés ont installé des bâches à l'entrée du tombeau où ils vivent dans sur le site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb. Les conditions de vie sont extrêmement dures quand l'eau de pluie s'infiltre dans la tombe. Depuis un an des centaines de déplacés trouvent refuge dans les ruines des célèbres « villes mortes » du nord ouest du pays. Éloignées des villes alentours, elles sont moins ciblées par les attaques aériennes de l'armée syrienne.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

It has been one year that the children refugees on the Shansharah archeological site in the Idlib region are not going to school. "Our school has been bombed by the army, we hope to start studying again when everything will be over."

Depuis un an les enfants réfugiés du site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb ne vont plus à l'école. « Notre école a été bombardée par l'armée, on espère retourner étudier quand tout se terminera ».

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Hygiene is very bad on the Shansharah archeological site, Idlib region. They fled the air strikes without being able to bring their personal belongings.

Les conditions d'hygiène des populations déplacées dans le site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb sont déplorables. Ils ont fui les bombardements sans pouvoir emporter leurs affaires personnelles.

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Life In The Graves
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By U.S. Editor
13 Apr 2013

In the Idlib region, North-Western Syria, hundreds of families take refuge in the "dead cities", which are Byzantine and Christian archeologic sites from the 3rd to the 6th Century.
In the Shansharah site, 80 km from Aleppo, Syrian displaced people have transformed graves into shelters: these dark and humid places are the only safe place they found to protect themselves from rockets, mortar and air attack.
Even if this part of the Idlib region has been liberated from the regime by rebels, bombings and air attacks from the Syrian army still are the daily fate of the inhabitants. Most of the Shansharah refugees are coming from Kafr Nabel and Kafr Rouma, two free cities regularly targetted by the Syrian army.
Living conditions are extremely hard in the Shansharah site : there is no electricity and running water. The closest water well is three kilometres far from the site. Displaced people go there everyday to get water. In the site there is only an ancient thermae with stagnate water that can be used to wash dishes and the clothes. Children often dive into this microbes nest. As a consequence, diseases are proliferating because of the lack of hygiene. The first disease is however coming from an insect: the leshmaniose, which gives big and red spots that erode the skin; it is spreading among Shansharah's displaced people, especially children. No organization is providing them any treatment.