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WestTX Stockyards Cafe (14 of 14)
Texas, USA
By Cécile Fandos
18 Apr 2013

Au lendemain de l'explosion, le Stockyards Café situé au bord de l'autoroute a fermé pour centraliser les donations de la grande distribution et organiser leur répartition auprès des victimes. Comme l'ensemble des salariés, qui "ne se verraient pas rester chez eux et ne rien faire", Janis participe à l'opération. Elle a été rejointe par sa fille et son gendre. "Tout le monde essaie d'aider", commentent ces derniers.
On the day after the blast, Stockyards Café, located on the side of the highway, closed its doors in order to gather the donations of large retailers and organize their distribution among the victims. Like the other employees who "could not see themselves stay at home doing nothing," Janis participates in the operation. Her daughter and son-in-law have also joined. "Everybody tries to help," they said.

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WestTX Stockyards (13 of 14)
Texas, USA
By Cécile Fandos
18 Apr 2013

Les ventes de bétail programmées au lendemain de l'explosion ont été annulées et les lieux réquisitionnés pour l'organisation des points presse.
The livestock sales scheduled for the day after the blast were canceled while the site was requisitioned for press briefings.

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outside Czech Stop (12 of 14)
Texas, USA
By Cécile Fandos
18 Apr 2013

La vie continue au très populaire Czech Stop, dont les clients entrent et sortent au même rythme qu'un jour habituel. Mais à l'intérieur, comme dans la plupart des commerces du secteur, on leur propose de faire une donation à destination des victimes de l'explosion.

Life goes on at the popular Czech Stop where clients come in and out as on an ordinary day. Inside however, and like in most of the businesses of the area, they are offered to make a donation for the victims of the blast.

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WestTX furniture store (11 of 14)
Texas, USA
By Cécile Fandos
18 Apr 2013

Preuve que son propriétaire est présent, la lumière est allumée dans ce magasin de meubles du centre-ville de West tout proche du lieu de l'explosion. Mais ses vitrines détruites, il affiche fermé.

The light of this furniture store in West city center is on, attesting the presence of its owner. However, a closed sign has been put up since the shop front is destroyed.

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WestTX Waco construction company (10 ...
Texas, USA
By Cécile Fandos
18 Apr 2013

Les entreprises de construction de la ville de Waco voisine sont venues en nombre sécuriser les bâtiments encore sur pied après l'explosion. Débordés, les quelques artisans de la ville ne pouvaient faire face à la demande.
Numerous construction companies of the neighboring city of Waco came to secure the buildings still standing after the explosion. In West, the few craftspersons were overwhelmed and could not face the demand alone.

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Made in Bangladesh (23 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (22 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (21 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (20 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (19 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (17 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (16 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (15 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (14 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (13 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (12 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (11 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (18 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
31 Mar 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Aleppo (6 of 15)
Aleppo, Syria
By LeeHarper
14 Mar 2013

A barbers shop remains open during the night in Aleppo, regardless of the shelling happening around the City. Many businesses and civilians try to live a normal life in the City

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Aleppo (5 of 15)
Aleppo, Syria
By LeeHarper
14 Mar 2013

A convience store open for business at night in Aleppo. In the Free Syrian Army controlled areas of the city, there are shops open throughout the day and night despite shelling around the city.

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Prince Charles Imparts Royal Advice t...
Amman, Jordan
By Amy Hybels
12 Mar 2013

The lack of job opportunities for young people is a serious problem in Jordan where the Labor Ministry reported an unemployment rate of 21.3% among 18-to-30 year olds.
During a recent visit to the Kingdom, Prince Charles took time to attend a business enterprise conference where he imparted some royal advice to young entrepreneurs. Amy Hybels has the story.

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Prince Charles, Duchess of Cornwall a...
Amman, Jordan
By hamzaeqab
12 Mar 2013

Their Majesties King Abdullah and Queen Rania on Monday held a dinner banquet in honour of Prince Charles and his wife Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, who started their visit to Jordan on Monday as part of a regional tour.

Prince Charles and the duchess will meet with King Abdullah and Queen Rania for discussions on bilateral ties and prospects for further cooperation, according to a Royal Court statement.

During the three-day visit, the Prince of Wales and the duchess of attend functions and activities aimed to increase Jordan-UK cooperation in the economic, environment, education and entrepreneurship fields.

The British royal couple were received upon arrival by HRH Prince Ghazi, the King’s adviser for religious and cultural affairs and the King’s personal envoy, along with other officials and diplomats from both sides.

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Herbal High (6 of 18)
Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
11 Mar 2013

For one bunch of the best quality khat is $40 which is often shared between two people. Although for a bag of just the leaves, it can be as cheap as $1 a bag. Local khat vendors come to Eastleigh to sell the stimulant as Somalis are their biggest customers. “I live outside, not here. Khat is more of a Somali thing, but I have to chew to show people it is not a bad thing,” says a local Kenyan trader.
Khat is also distributed within Nairobi. It is farmed in Meru and arrives in Eastleigh at 2pm everyday. It is preordered and bundled with the customers name written on their sack. Local vendors then collect their parcels and sell to local chewers. The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) in the UK reports that more than 2,500 tonnes, worth about £13.8m, was imported by the UK in 2011/12, bringing in £2.8m of tax revenues. Khat is still legal in the UK, even though it has been banned by the US and other European countries. Khat is shipped to the UK four days a week from Kenya.

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KENYA DAILY LIFE (18 of 27)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
28 Feb 2013

Fish for sale in Kibera slum, Nairobi.
Picture/Karel Prinsloo

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KENYA DAILY LIFE (3 of 27)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
28 Feb 2013

Shoes for sale in the Kibera slum, Nairobi.
Picture/Karel Prinsloo

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Nigeria Youth Unemployment
Lagos, Nigeria
By Taiwo Adeleke
08 Feb 2013

The short documentary shows the everyday life of some Graduate youth in Lagos Nigeria who faces the daily challenges of unemployment and the hard economic situation in the country . Some of them narrated their experience with me and how they were able to find a means of livelihood for their self by been entrepreneur and how government as not fund the small business owners in the country.

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Épisode 6 - Huile d'argan et femmes r...
N12,Morocco
By Conteur d'images
01 Jan 2013

Dans le sud du Maroc, une coopérative féminine de l’ethnie Amazigh lutte chaque jour pour faire valoir les droits des femmes et protéger l’Arganier, arbre sacré du Maroc.

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General Strike, Protests In Barcelona...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
14 Nov 2012

Shops were closed throughout the day in conjunction with a massive strike in Spain; the main economic sectors closed including transportation, trade and industry. Earlier in the morning picketers gathered in front of businesses.

Momento de los disturbios
Seguimiento masivo de la huelga General en España. Hoy los principales sectores economicos se han paralizado: el transporte, el comercio y la industria.
Por la mañana se han formado numerosos piquetes informativos delante de las empresas.

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General Strike, Protests In Barcelona...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
14 Nov 2012

Protest called for by the major unions.
Shops were closed throughout the day in conjunction with a massive strike in Spain; the main economic sectors closed including transportation, trade and industry. Earlier in the morning picketers gathered in front of businesses.

Manifestacion convocada por los sidicatos mayoritarios.S eguimiento masivo de la huelga General en España. Hoy los principales sectores economicos se han paralizado: el transporte, el comercio y la industria.
Por la mañana se han formado numerosos piquetes informativos delante de las empresas.

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General Strike, Protests In Barcelona...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
14 Nov 2012

Leading Spain on strike.
Shops were closed throughout the day in conjunction with a massive strike in Spain; the main economic sectors closed including transportation, trade and industry. Earlier in the morning picketers gathered in front of businesses.

Cabecera de la manifestación de la jornada de huelga.
Seguimiento masivo de la huelga General en España. Hoy los principales sectores economicos se han paralizado: el transporte, el comercio y la industria.
Por la mañana se han formado numerosos piquetes informativos delante de las empresas.

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General Strike, Protests In Barcelona...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
14 Nov 2012

Shops were closed throughout the day in conjunction with a massive strike in Spain; the main economic sectors closed including transportation, trade and industry. Earlier in the morning picketers gathered in front of businesses.

Comercios cerrados a sido la tónica de toda la jornada.
Seguimiento masivo de la huelga General en España. Hoy los principales sectores economicos se han paralizado: el transporte, el comercio y la industria.
Por la mañana se han formado numerosos piquetes informativos delante de las empresas.

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General Strike, Protests In Barcelona...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
14 Nov 2012

Shops were closed throughout the day in conjunction with a massive strike in Spain; the main economic sectors closed including transportation, trade and industry. Earlier in the morning picketers gathered in front of businesses.

Disturbios durante la manifestacion convocada Por entidades anarquistas.
Seguimiento masivo de la huelga General en España. Hoy los principales sectores economicos se han paralizado: el transporte, el comercio y la industria.
Por la mañana se han formado numerosos piquetes informativos delante de las empresas.

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African Wood Company Seeks to Refores...
Yatta, Kitui - Kenya
By Ruud Elmendorp
14 Nov 2012

The Africa Wood Grow company is trying a new angle on replanting, and combatting deforestation. They hope to make their endeavor lucrative, and attractive to business owners who need lumber, and other wood products.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (1 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Daha Printing Press first opened its doors to Mogadishu in 1967. Despite a brief period of nationalization during the 70's, the shop has remained with its original owners, and printers, for over three generations.

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THE LETTERPRESS OF MOGADISHU
Mogadishu, Somalia
By Mais Istanbuli
01 Oct 2012

A print shop in the Somali capital tells the story of the country's two decades of turmoil -- and rebirth.
In a tiny, damp, oil-soaked cellar tucked behind one of Mogadishu's bullet-pocked central streets, fragile remnants of a city's survival clutter the rickety shelves. Their location, hidden just beneath Mogadishu's shelled façade, is perhaps their only reason for survival.

For 45 years, Daha Printing Press has accumulated an inked archive of Mogadishu's intricate, vibrant and violent political and social history. As governments, dictators, warlords, and militias battled for control of the streets above, Daha operated like a well-oiled machine, printing for all who walked in their door. Everybody, it seems, has something to print.

"Even warlords needed to collect taxes," Liban Egal, the son of Daha's original owner, asserts.

Customs declaration forms for Mogadishu's bustling port, still written in Italian from early post-colonial days, sit freshly pressed on the table; they are being repurposed for Somalia's new government. Tax collection slips and Central Bank account ledgers from the military rule of Mohamed Siad Barre -- whose ousting in 1991 launched two decades of civil war -- litter the stock room. Business cards, like that of notorious warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid, who was the target of a failed American assassination attempt (which in turn resulted the infamous 'Black Hawk Down' incident), fill old wooden drawers. Even United Nations Development Program reports from the 1980's hide under crumbling shelves.

Originally opened in central Mogadishu in 1967, Daha Printing Press was founded by 25 year-old Abdi Egal Hassan. Hassan took skills he mastered studying printmaking in Germany through a scholarship, and built a thriving enterprise.

By 1969, General Mohamed Siad Barre staged a successful military coup and took control of Somalia. He experimented with Chinese-influenced 'scientific socialism,' and in 1971 all private sector workers became government employees. All large businesses became government businesses. Daha was shut down.

Barre eventually switched sides during the Cold War, aligning with the US. In 1983 Abdi was able to reopen Daha Printing Press. The small letterpress shop has remained unchanged in location, machinery and employees, ever since.

Liban Egal, Abdi Egal Hassan's son, currently owns Daha. Liban, who grew up working the printing press after school, has recently returned to Mogadishu after spending more than twenty years abroad. In addition to resuming work at the press, he is founding the First Somali Bank -- Somalia's first since the collapse of the country's Central Bank in 1991 -- along with Somalia Wireless, a mobile internet company.

With Mogadishu quivering on the edge of sustained peace for the first time in two decades, Kasim Shiek Ahmed, whose family has labored behind the machines for 3 generations, and Liban are ready to welcome the arrival of Somalia's first real government in as many years. On August 20th, the Federal Parliament of Somalia was inaugurated, and the Federal Government of Somalia, the first permanent central government since 1991, replaced the Transitional Federal Government. On September 16th, Hassan Sheik Mohamud, a political activist and academic, was sworn in as Somalia's newest President.

"As soon as this new government begins, that's when we begin," exclaims Liban "Every Ministry will need some kind of paper."

The old Heidelberg printing press, its slickly oiled gears churning beneath the shell-shocked streets, will also press on. "We can't forget this machine," Kasim expresses with a wide grin. "It's like family

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India Shut Down: Life hit at many pla...
C-58 Noida up
By newspoint
20 Sep 2012

The day-long nationwide shut down called for by the Left parties and NDA on Thursday, demanding a rollback of the government's decision to hike diesel prices, cap subsidised cooking gas cylinders and allow foreign direct investment (FDI) in multi-brand retail, has hit life in many places and businesses in the country.
The Bhartiya Janta Party (BJP) Youth wing’s activists blocked rail traffic, stopping trains.
 Members of Political parties like Samajwadi Party (SP), CPM, CPI, TDP, BJD, JD (S), Trimul Congress (TMC) All India Forward Bloc and the RSP have plans to organise picketing, demonstrations and court arrest.

Byte: Nitin Gatkari , National President of Bhartiya Janta party (BJP)
“Economic decisions taken by the Congress would impact the poor and labourers, and the party would continue to fight them”. Byte: Salman Khurshid , Law Minister of India Visual & Byte Description:
1-Delhi
2-Lucknow (Utter Pradesh)
3-Jaipur (Rajsthan)
4-Hamirpur (Utter Pradesh)
Byte: Nitin Gatkari , National President of Bhartiya Janta party (BJP)
Byte: Salman Khurshid , Law Minister of India

Date-20 Sept 2012
Country : India
Slug: India Shut Down: Life hit at many places, trains stopped, PM's effigy burnt

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Ambrosetti Forum, Villa D'Este, Cerno...
Cernobbio, Italy
By Editor's Picks
09 Sep 2012

Photos and video taken at the annual European House Ambrosetti Forum at Villa D'Este, Cernobbio, Italy, over the weekend of September 7-9, 2012. The forum is an annual economic conference where heads of state, ministers, Nobel laureates and businessmen gather to discuss current and future economic challenges, scientific, technological and geo-political developments that impact business and society.

Among the attendees were Joaquim Alumnia, EU Commissioner for free-market policies, the President of Israel Shimon Perez, Romano Prodi, former Italian Prime Minister and former President of the European Commission, Giulio Tremonti and Renato Brunetta of the Italian Parliament, economics professor at Stern Business School and Chairman of Roubini Global Economics Nouriel Roubini, Herman Van Rompuy, President of the European Council and Mario Monti, Italian Prime Minister, among politicians, businessmen, and economics experts worldwide.

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Aerial Photo of the Qatari capital Doha
Doha, Qatar
By Mariwan Salihi
02 Sep 2012

Aerial photo of Doha's glitzy business district, "West Bay," north of the Qatari capital.

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Origin Rwanda (19 of 30)
Rwanda
By jonathankalan
29 Jul 2012

Uzziel Habineza, a Rwandan cupper and roaster, in the laboratory at Starbucks Coffee's HQ in Kigali, Rwanda. A genocide survivor from Nyabumera, Rwanda, he is now the sole representative for Volcafe, one of the world's largest coffee suppliers, in Rwanda.