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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 17
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 19
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 20
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

An old ship is maneuvered into place in a shipyard outside Dhaka where it will be either repaired or dismantled for parts and scrap metal.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 22
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 27
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

A child plays with her dog inside a ship recycling yard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 24
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

A child plays with her dog inside a ship recycling yard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 25
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

A child plays with her dog inside a ship recycling yard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 26
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

About 15,000 people work in extremely dangerous conditions and earn between $4 and $5 as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common. Shipyard workers say make very meager earnings, without proper safety, and surrounded by the smell of asbestos.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 28
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

Young children, mostly climate refugees from flooded areas of the country, work in the shipyards, collecting scrap metal and used oil to sell in local markets.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 16
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 18
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

A mid-size vessel sits in a boatyard outside Dhaka among old ships, ripe for recycling. Bangladesh is now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market, building vessels for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 21
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 23
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 11
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

A shipyard worker gets prepared to weld near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 14
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 01
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Shipyard workers pose for the camera in a year near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 02
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 07
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Most of the private shipyards use plate steel, engines, components and machinery from old merchant ships collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 09
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Two men are hard at work welding metal in a shipyard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 10
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Most of the private shipyards use plate steel, engines, components and machinery from old merchant ships collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 13
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 15
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

A boy stops to pose for a photo while playing near a ship recycling yard in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 05
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

17 year-old Ashraful has seen several of his colleagues fall victim to explosions, caused by ruptures in gas cylinders. He breaks down the rusty, old supertankers, cargo ships and cruisers to be scrapped. Most of them live by eating rice and vegetables. Ashraful cannot remember when he last ate meat.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 08
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

A man is hard at work welding metal in a shipyard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

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Russia Faces Currency Woes (NSV)
Moscow
By Julia Lyubova
28 Nov 2014

NATURAL SOUND VERSION -- Suggested Script Below

Russia is facing bleak economic prospects as the country's national currency continues to fall. The ruble has already lost almost 30% of its value since June. It plunged some 14% against the US dollar in November alone. The ruble’s devaluation has had an adverse effect on many sectors of the economy.

Western sanctions over the Ukrainian crisis are playing a serious role in Russia's economic woes. The country's Finance Minister recently said that the economy is set to lose 40 billion US dollars per year from sanctions. These punitive measures block Russian companies from borrowing in the West, which could push the country towards a credit crunch.

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Karachi Businesswoman Promotes Self-E...
Karachi
By Misha Rezvi
25 Nov 2014

Sabeen Mahmud is a Pakistani entrepreneur running a café and community space known more for serving up civil discourse than lattes. T2F is an unusual place in a city like Karachi, notorious for violence. She describes her inspiration for the space, her life as a businesswoman, and the trials and tribulations of running a business in such a volatile environment. All the while, she gives us a glimpse at what life is like for a small but growing scene of creative young people in Pakistan.

In recent years, sectarian killings have raised fears concerning the security of Karachi, where Shiites and other religious minorities became the targets of numerous attacks and killings. At the start of 2014, a suicide bomber attempted to enter a school in a Shiite area. At the time, numerous Shiite doctors, lawyers and professors told authorities they had been being stalked by masked gunmen.

The month of Muharram, which has been riddled with sectarian violence across the country in the past few years, presents T2F with a series of cultural and political tensions to navigate as Sabeen debates with her staff about going ahead with a First Friday of the month open mic night.

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Myanmar: A Yangon River Ferry's Last Day
Yangon
By Raw Music International
12 Nov 2014

As Myanmar begins seeing sanctions against it lifted, foreign firms, including a Japanese company whose ferryboats will replace the old boats that until recently criss-crossed the Yangon River, have begun vying to open markets in the country, bringing with them the changes to everyday life that come with the influx of new goods and services.

Traffic sits static in the swelteringly damp heat of Yangon’s streets, filling the air with fumes. Noodle stalls, tea stalls, clothes stalls, nick-nack stalls and finally, pedestrians pack sidewalks to the edge, the pavements stained red from the constant spitting of Betel-nut juice. Sprays of blood-red saliva spurt from taxi windows and the mouth of every other Betel chewer on the street. The soundtrack is a constant ring of shouts, calls, coughs, engines and around dawn and dusk, the cawing of crows. However, despite the chaos, the investment and development brought to the city in recent years is obvious. Encouraged by apparent moves towards democracy, foreign companies have begun to see Myanmar as viable and potentially lucrative option. Yangon feels like a place where things are changing.

Not far outside of Yangon things don’t move so fast. The ferry crossing the river between the city and the semi-rural township of Dala is packed all day with commuters, traders and labourers who rely on the crossing to access work in Yangon. Like tens of thousands of other Burmese they leave underdeveloped townships and head to the former capital each day to make their living.

This video, filmed on the last days the two decrepit ferries would operate before being replaced by newer boats, puts forward small aspects of Burmese daily life that speak to wider changes occurring in the country.

Dying Trades in the Holy Land
By dafnatal7
04 Sep 2014

A look at some of Israel's last family businesses, which are being crushed by changing times. For some of the most traditional Jewish and Arab businesses, it won't be long before their doors close for the last time. New technologies, large corporations, and the draw of the modern world mean that the next generation of consumers and the heirs to the businesses no longer have an interest in the businesses' futures.

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Syria: the Business of Kidnapping
Ras al Ayn
By TTM Contributor 25
26 Aug 2014

April 5, 2014
Ras al Ain, Syria

Younan Constantine Younan, a Syrian-christian from Ras al Ayn, was kidnapped by Jabhat al-Nusra and released for a 100 000USD ransom after 40 days of torture. Younan's experience illustrates the marriage of ideology and business when it comes to kidnapping by radical Islamic militias in Syria. While the ultimate goal of the kidnapping was to extort money and not to punish Younan for being christian, Younan believes that the fact that he is christian allowed the kidnappers to feel the kidnapping was ideologically acceptable and not against Islam.

Shot List and Translation:

Shots of the city of Ras al Ain.
Shots of the Syriac Church in the town, located next to Younan's house.
Shots of Younan inside the Church.

Interview:

"I was kidnapped by the Gouiran battalion/ al Hasakah, I was tricked. My uncle owns a factory in western Ras al Ayn, just before Tell Halaf. We produce materials for building and construction. It was there that the battalion decided to settle in. We kept on asking them when would be leaving and they always replied "tomorrow, tomorrow, we will go and liberate al Hasakah". They were all citizens of al-Hasakah. One of the battalion's members was called Mohammad Aadouch. One day, they took all our trucks, stating that the trucks belong now to Jabhat al Nusra. We went to ask Jabhat al Nusra for our trucks, they replied the trucks aren't yours anymore. We kept on trying with the battalion and Jabhat al Nusra for 4 to 5 days to get our trucks back until the battalion's commander, called Tamim, said, 'I have the trucks and I will give them back to you after 2-3 days.' There was fighting in the area so we stayed home all day, and we went to meet with them every day around noon.

One day, he told us to go with him so he can show us where the trucks are, in a town called Al-Aziziyah. I went with my cousin. Right before arriving to Al-Aziziyah, we were ambushed by 6 fighters, some of them were in their cars, asking for our IDs. Once we gave them our IDs, they told us that we were "the wanted persons". The reason they said this was that my cousin had a farm that is worth a lot and, being Christian, his money was Halal. They pointed their AK-47 at us, handcuffed us, put us in the back of the vehicles and drove us to Ras al Ain, Allah only knows where to.

Once there, they told us our case was simple, a week maximum and we'll be free. On the tenth day, they called our parents, and asked them for 100,000 USD for each. We didn't have any contact with the kidnappers; they put us in a room, handcuffed and kept our eyes uncovered. They would only cover our eyes when the guards come in to give us food. On the fortieth day, they covered our eyes and they started to beat us with their hands, belts and riffles. We could tell that they were the same persons on the Gouiran Battalion because of their voices and their accents. While they were torturing us, our parents were on the phone, and they kept on asking them for money. After 4 hours of being tortured, they took us to a school they turned into a prison. We remained there until the fiftieth day, when they covered our heads and removed our handcuffs, and dropped us in a city called Suluk, in the countryside of Ar-Raqqah. We took a car to Ras al Ayn, where they took the money, the amount of 3,500,000 Syrian Pounds.

My uncle was dead when we came back, he never knew his son and nephew were kidnapped. The day after we went to check on the factory, we found out they stole everything; tools, metals, they left nothing. After few days, we discovered that all our personal papers and IDs were with Jabhat al Nusra. We realized that they were in coordination with the battalion that kidnapped us, when they told our parents before that they are working as an intermediary to set us free.

It was then when we realized that they were all the same."

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Istanbul's Breaking Bad Cafe Chain Se...
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

In early 2014, Deniz Kosan, 28, launched Walter's Coffee Roastery, a cafe designed after the hit TV show Breaking Bad. The popular series told the story of Walter White, a high school chemistry teacher who turns to cooking meth after being diagnosed with terminal cancer. The cafe's interior is loosely based on White's meth superlab complete with Hazmat suits, gas masks, a giant periodic table and coffee served in beakers and test tubes. The cafe has proved to be a raging success among locals and tourists alike. Now Kosan is set to expand his coffee superlab worldwide with a soft opening set for New York March 2016 and later Europe. Franchisers are also underway in Russia, UAE and the UK. Coining a phrase from his cafe's name sake, Kosan says, "We're not in the coffee business. We're in the empire business."

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Dreaming singapore 018
Semarang, Indonesia
By Ruom
10 Jun 2014

A domestic worker returns to work in Singapore after attending her mother's funeral at her home in Indonesia.

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Dreaming singapore 010
Kendal, Indonesia
By Ruom
09 Jun 2014

Aspiring domestic workers relax in their bunks at training centre.

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Dreaming singapore 042
Semarang, Indonesia
By Ruom
08 Jun 2014

Tutik arrives home after working in Singapore for three years. Her daughter Ika is so happy she is home she doesn't leave her alone.

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Dreaming singapore 040
Singapore
By Ruom
08 Jun 2014

Tutik prepares to fly home. She finished her contract with her employer and waits to board her plane back to Semarang in Indonesia.