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“Until the Last Drop of Blood”; Syria...
Hasaka
By TTM Contributor 33
01 Feb 2015

Hasaka, Syria
February 1, 2015

Dozens of Kurdish fighters killed in various battles were buried during a large ceremony at the Martyr Khelil Sarukhan cemetery in the city of Hasaka, northeast Syria.
There have been heavy battles between ISIS and the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) for several months, mostly centered in the city of Kobane. Unprecedented clashes also erupted on January 17 between the YPG and Syrian regime forces outside the city of Hasaka, killing more than 20 Kurdish fighters and civilians were killed in this fighting.
Hasaka is part of the autonomous region in Syria proclaimed in by the Democratic Union Party (PYD), the umbrella group with which the YPG is affiliated.
The PYD has been previously accused by members of Syrian opposition of collaborating with the Syrian regime.
This video shows the burial ceremony, during which families of killed fighters appear gathering, holding YPG flags and reading verses from the Quran. Video also includes interviews with a female Kurdish political militant and the wives of two fighters killed in battles with ISIS.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of Asayesh (Kurdish security force) members
Various of women weeping next to graves
Medium of boys watering plant on a grave
Wide of fighter talking to woman in the graveyard
Various of woman crying next to fighter’s grave
Wide of male and female fighters standing next to a grave
Wide of people at cemetery entrance
Various of children holding YPG flag in the cemetery
Wide of people at cemetery entrance
Various of mourners near the grave of Asayish member
Wide of graves
Wide of women sitting near a grave
Medium of woman reading Quran
Wide of a dug grave
Wide of people at cemetery entrance
Wide of female militants searching a woman at the entrance of cemetery
Various of cemetery entrance
Wide of convoy
Various of procession to carry bodies of fighters to the cemetery
Wide of coffin
Various of female fighters preparing for ceremony
Wide of people gathered at the entrance of cemetery
Wide of Nawal Kelo, Kurdish Political Militant

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Woman), Nawal Kelo, Kurdish Political Militant
04:49 - 07:06

“About the latest events in Rojava [Syrian part of Kurdistan], the Syrian regime was not convinced that the YPG was an umbrella for all the free people in Rojava and Syria, without consideration of religion or race. The regime did not acknowledge that the YPG will win against ISIS, which the regime has created, especially in Kobane. “The regime tried to relieve ISIS from pressure in Hasaka, thinking that it could have full control over the events. The regime wanted to destroy everyone and then destroy the YPG, but it was faced with strong fighting form the side of the YPG, which has also been strong in the face of ISIS. Many died from the regime’s side, also about 20 Kurdish civilians and fighters died. The YPG will protect the area and all of Syria, and it will not disappoint the public. ISIS is the creation of the Syrian regime and its former friend [Turkish President Recep Tayyip] Erdogan. At the end, they will taste their own medicine and they will be forced to acknowledge the power of the Kurdish people and its free will, which are above all other laws.”
“The resistance and victory in Kobane proved to the world the free will of the Kurdish people as well as the rest of the Syrian population. We will lead ourselves. We have institutions lead by the Kurdish administration; we have councils and military forces. We will resist until the last drop of blood. Our people have free will and are bonded to their land. Those who do not have free will or a higher aim are ISIS and the Syrian regime.”

Various of Zouzan, Female Asayish Member whose husband was killed in a battle with ISIS

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Woman) Zouzan, Female Asayish Member whose husband was killed in a battle with ISIS
07:18 – 08:28

“I am a member of the Asayish, the Kurdish security forces, and the wife of martyr Hoker. I carried my husband's weapon after he died and swore to continue his fight until we clean Rojava from ISIS and the regime. I have children, and I insist to avenge my husband and defend my country and my land, we will fight until the last drop of blood.” “I do not know why everyone is against us, Kurds. They want to take our women, kill our children, evict us, murder us. We are Kurds and Muslims. What do they want from us? With the blood of our martyrs we will destroy the terrorists, and live safely and freely.”

Medium of Zouzan, Female Asayish Member whose husband was killed in a battle with ISIS
Various of Salma Muhammad, the widow of a fighter killed during a battles with ISIS

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Salma Muhammad, the widow of a fighter was killed by ISIS
08:49 – 09:50

“What is happening is not in ISIS’ interest. If ISIS goes a step or two in the direction of Rojava, especially Qamishli, the young and adults will carry weapons. We will not leave them. We will resist in the west of Kurdistan. The regime should recall what the sacrifices and martyrs offered by the Kurds to revive Syria. Now, we want Syrian to be a democratic nation. We are not demanding independence. Why are these martyrs falling? Each martyr… we send a thousand salutes to the leader Abdullah Ocalan – salutes that bear the scent of martyrs’ blood. ‘Apo’ should know that we are sacrificing to have democracy according to his great ideas. We do not accept any other form of democracy.”

Cutaway – medium of Salma Muhammad
Various of burial
Wide of group carrying flags

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The men of Al Araqib pray. They say they want a normal life, and they just want to make their area beautiful. "The government just wants to gather the maximum of Arabs in the minimum of land. But we have our history here. We won't leave".

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Aziz, chief of the village (center):

"When the Israeli government started, in 1997, the new ministry 'Department of Negev and Galilee', headed by Shimon Peres, we thought that maybe the situation would change because Peres was a Nobel prize man. However instead, every year, from 1999 and until 2003, they sprayed us with Round Up weed killer. [They killed] the grass and over 200 sheep, 16 Arab horses and 2 camels. They want to kill the relationship between the Bedouins and the land".

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Sally is the wife of the mayor. Gathered in the plastic tarp are all of their belongings, included cooking utensils and a little bit of food, like canned tuna.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The cemetery area of Al Turi is empty of animals. The Bedouins there only own 3 horses and a few ducks and chickens. They used to have sheep and camels. The sheep have been killed and the camels confiscated. Once, a camel caused a car accident. Since then, as soon as the soldiers see a camel in the desert, they take it and bring it to a "camel farm" that they have opened. They keep the camel there one month and send us the bill for the food and care. If we cannot pay after this month, the camel is lost forever. And they then sell us the camel milk that we love so much.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Sally:

"Before Israel chased us away, we worked, cultivated our land, had sheep, chickens, vegetables, trees. Our home was very simple, but we had everything, including a kitchen and toilets. Today we have nothing, we cannot take a shower everyday. They made the area and our homes illegal. Because Israel says our way of life is not normal. I asked [the Israelis], how can I make my home legal? [They had] no answer."

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The entrance of Al Turi cemetary in Al Araqib. 22 families used to live here. Since July 27th, 2010, the " Black Day" as the Bedouins call it, only 12 people are still living in Al Araqib, confined in the graveyard. The "Black Day" is the day where the village was totally demolished by the Israeli army. They came at 4am, destroyed 65 houses, uprooted 4.500 olive trees and 700 fruit trees and killed dozens of chickens.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Maryam is the dean of Al Araqib. She has suffered all kinds of harassment since 1948 at the hands of the Israeli army and various Zionist gangs. In her lifetime, Israeli authorities or vigilanties have destroyed or vandalized her home and land more than 70 times (33 of those raids took place after 2010).

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Saba plays with her daughter Araqib before she begins cooking dinner. Saba says: "I do nothing during the day except watching to see if the police or soldiers are coming so I can hide everything that wouldn't be already hidden among the graves".

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The last time the army came to Al Araqib's cemetery was October 14, 2014. They took fridges and cars. Now the men live under the trees and sleep in the 2 cars that are left.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Saba lives in the graveyard with her husband, daughter, brothers, sisters, and grand-mother. Everyday, she hides all of their belongings among the graves to prevent the soldiers from confiscating them. Then, when night comes, she goes to take the carpets and blankets so the family can sleep.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Araqib is 2 years old and a half. She is the youngest inhabitant of the graveyard of Al Araqib. She has been named after the village.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The three youngest children of Al Araqib from left to right: Araqib (2 1/2), Mohamed (14) and Khaled (12). Mohamed and Khaled go by foot to school everyday in the recognized Bedouin village of Rahat.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

On July 12th, 2014, after the Israeli army came and destroyed everything around the graveyard, they set up a military zone in the Negev, not far from Al Araqib. Police and army were present 24/7.

In September, the police left. Aziz, the chief of the village describes the current situation:

"They still come from time to time, look at what's happening and leave. Sometimes, they destroy something, took our clothes, blankets, carpets and any personal belonging."

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

In June 2014, the two families that are still living in Al Araqib decided to move into the graveyard. Before that, they actually lived next to it, but the army came anyway and destroyed everything they could. However, according to Aziz, the chief of the family, "the graves are like a border. The police don't intervene".

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As Number of Deaths in Syria Rises, H...
Damascus
By mchreyteh
08 Oct 2014

October 2014
Old Damascus, Syria

Text by Youssef Zbib

In the tombstone masonries of Bab al-Jabiya souk in Old Damascus, smooth white marble blocks are stacked against the walls, waiting to go under skilled craftsmen’s hammers and chisels to become headstones engraved with scripture from the Quran.
Headstone carvers in this old souk say that demand for their products has increased since the start of the war in Syria.
“Before the events, we had an average amount of work. Clients asked for headstones for people who died of natural causes,” said Ziad, a headstone craftsman in Bab al-Jabiya. “Now, due to the events, our work has increased because there are martyrs. There have been more deaths here in Damascus, so we have had more work.” The number of deaths has indeed been very high. As the conflict nears its fourth year, the United Nations has estimated that at least 191,000 civilians and fighters have been killed in Syria between March 2011 and the end of April 2014.
Between 100 and 200 people, both civilians and military, are killed every day, according to reports by the UK-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and other local monitoring groups. In a single attack, more than 1,300 people were killed in August 2013 when government forces used chemical weapons against rebel-controlled areas in Eastern Ghouta near Damascus. Deadly battles are still raging in this area, as government forces advance on rebel-held towns.
The battles following the blitz attack by ISIS in Syria’s east and northeast in June 2014 have also been very bloody. At least 400 people were killed in the battle over the city of Kobani from mid-September to early October 2014.
But the increasing demand for headstones does not necessarily mean that headstone carvers are making more profit. Due to the economic crisis, customers are asking for cheaper headstones.
“In the old days, people used long headstones. They considered them to be more beautiful and presentable. Today, people have different requirements,” said Samer, another headstone carver in the Bab al-Jabiya souk. According to Samer, people ask for shorter headstones because of their poor financial situation, and also ask for less engraving in order to pay less.
“Of course, prices differ,” said Samer. “High-relief carving costs more [than low-relief carving] because it takes more time to be done. The design at the top of the headstone – we call it “The Crown” – also affects the price. Some designs take two days to finish, others two hours, so the prices necessarily differ.” Moataz, who owns a tombstone masonry in the same souk, also says that although the demand for headstones has increased, it is not as high as he would expect it to be, given the high number of killings as a result of the fighting. Moataz believes that families of the deceased are not offering their beloved departed what they deserve.
“Some people postpone buying a headstone because, at the time of the burial, they are unable to afford it,” said Moataz. “Smaller headstones now replace large ones. Sometimes a single headstone is used to cover four or five graves.” In the areas most affected by the war, such as Deir Ezzor and eastern neighborhoods of Aleppo, the dead are even “less fortunate” than those in Damascus. People use any available space to hastily bury the victims of daily bombing and gun battles, due to the high number of killings and fears that large gatherings of mourners might be killed in airstrikes themselves. Public parks and private gardens have become sites for unmarked graves.
A war economy
The emergent war economy has also fostered some professions that did not exist or were not developed before the war, like illegal money changing. The fluctuation of the Syrian pound’s exchange rate offered the opportunity for a currency black market in Damascus and Aleppo.
The government lost control over most the oil fields in Deir Ezzor and Hassaka provinces in the east and northeast, which allowed oil smugglers affiliated with armed groups to extract crude oil that is refined in makeshift distilleries and then sold in opposition-controlled areas or smuggled across the border to Turkey.
But many industries have been weakened by the conflict. Shops near the headstone workshops in Old Damascus have lost a many of their clients as the war has divided Syria’s territories and economy.

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The Jewish Community in Livorno Article
Livorno, Italy
By Nili Bassan
16 Apr 2013

Livorno is considered the most modern of all the towns of the Tuscany region. It has the biggest port of the region and it is the most populated coastal town. The emblem of the town is the monument of the four “mori” - pirates - a famous sculpture that represents dark-skinned pirates constricted by chains at
the feet of the Grand Duke Ferdinando I. The artwork has been realized during the time in which the town was enhanced itself as cosmopolitan town, through establishment of rules that allows the town to welcome with open arms Jewish people banished from Spain and Portugal. The story of Jewish people living in Livorno starts since that moment. Historical tradition of Livorno and Jewish culture are merged permanently until nowadays and Livorno is defined as the town of Judaism. It was held by Jew family the memorable bookshop and the publishing house named Belforte. Typical dishes the “roschette”,
caucciucco(fish stew) and the Livorno-style mullet are of the Sephardic tradition.

Like the typical words as “sciagattato” – ruined, and “gadollo” - fat or “gavinoso” – funny, which are picked up from the Bagitto and Hebrew dialect and still in use today . Jew was the Mayor of the prefascist town of Livorno, the Socialist Umberto Mondolfi. The list is including religious citizens like Rabbis Elia Benamozegh – was the Rabbi of Livorno for 50 years, Rabbi Sabato Morais and Alfredo Toaff, famous people like the philanthropist Moses Montefiore, sages and intellectuals like Attias, D'Ancona and Enriques, famous painters like Tivoli, Corcos and of course Amedeo Modigliani. These are only few
famous names of the entire Jewish community of Livorno. Livorno is housing of an old Sephardic Synagogue, considered one of the biggest and beautiful Synagogue around the world, it was built in 1591 but seriously damaged by the American bombing in 1945, then it became the goal of several raids during
the last time of second WW, and this led to a complete destruction of the Synagogue itself. The works for the new Synagogue committed to the architect Mr. Angelo di Castro started at the beginning of the sixties, a building of reinforced concrete inspired by the tabernacle (sanctuary tent) that accompanied the Jewish along the desert during the exodus- the new Synagogue has a modern style that it is not well accepted among the Jewish community of Livorno. Whatever, the young Rav Yair Didi religious leader of the community and well known and respected personality in the city is suggesting to not look the outside but the inside of the Synagogue. next to the synagogue is the center or the house of the Jewish community, there is the archive of the community,400 years of documents written in Portuguese, Italian or Hebrew. But the real oral memory is Gabriele Bedarida. He is keeping memories of what was the Jewish Livorno in the past. In the 1938, during the fascism period, before that the King enacted racial laws more than 1500 Jewish people lived in Livorno. More than 120 Jewish people of Livorno were wiped out in the Nazi concentration camps. Many of the people in the Jewish community of Livorno were rescued in the Nazi search, fleeing to the bush, hiding kids in convents, in religious colleges, or finding shelter by antiNazi friends. By the end of the WW II the Jewish community of Livorno had less than 1000 people.

Today there are around 600 Jewish people registered as Jewish community of Livorno, that leads, the community of Livorno to be considered one of the most important Jewish community in Italy after the one in Rome. But the Jewish community of Livorno is an old and aged community with no turnover. The last migration of Sephardic Jews in Livorno is dated to 1967 when due to the six days war many Jews abandoned Arab countries and part arrived in Livorno. Mainly people from the Bengasi community in Libya decided for moving to Livorno. Today the majority of the Jewish community of Livorno is made up by older people with only few young that rarely participate to the life of the community. There are around 70 Jewish people in Livorno that actively attend Jewish liturgies such as Shabbat and even more than 400 persons during Pesach or Yom Kippur. In the last three years 6 young Jews decided to leave Italy to
flee to Israel for aliyah. In the city center and in the market many shops are still run by Jew families: like the Disegni, Zarrugh, Doha, Modigliani, Bueno and Lombardo are some of the common names. On the other hand the Jewish school closed during the fascism has never been reopened and the same destiny
has occurred to the Jewish hospital and after a while to the old cemetery. There is no any Israeli restaurant in Livorno , the last running was closed four years ago. There is a bakery that works under Jewish rules producing bread without milk or animal fat/lard. There is also a kosher batcher that supplies
kosher meet to members of the Jewish community of Livorno. There is a Jewish museum, located in Villa Marini belonged to Marini family until 1867,was used as a synagogue until the new synagogue was open and on 1992 opened as a museum. the small collection is including a Hechal(temple) of the XVI
century,shofar,tallit on the wall are old marriage agreements.

There is an old cemetery closed and in a state of completely decay. The new cemetery is in use and located in the north of the city and it is near the general cemetery. In the new cemetery are the grave of Modeliani family and two memory boards one perpetuates the Jewish people that died during First World War and the other perpetuates the victims of the holocaust.

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The Jewish Community in Livorno
Livorno, Italy
By Mais Istanbuli
16 Apr 2013

The town of Livorno once welcomed with open arms Jews banished from Spain and Portugal. The historical traditions of Livorno and Jewish cultures are still merged to this day, evident by typical dishes such as the “roschette”, “caucciucco” (fish stew) and the Livorno-style mullet, all of which are of the Sephardi tradition.

Livorno is home to an old Sephardi Synagogue that was built in 1591 but seriously damaged by American bombing in 1945. The construction of a new Synagogue was initiated by architect Angelo di Castro at the beginning of the 1960s. The original building was comprised of reinforced concrete inspired by the tabernacle (sanctuary tent) that accompanied the Jewish peoples along the desert during the exodus. The new Synagogue has a modern style that it is not accepted by all the Jewish community of Livorno. Although externally modern, inside the synagogue and the center of the Jewish community adjacent to it is a dedication to the Jewish history of Italy. Both buildings host over 400 years worth of documents written in Portuguese, Italian or Hebrew.

Today there are around 600 Jewish people registered as residents in Livorno. During the Arab-Israeli war the Jews of Libya’s second largest city of Benghazi also headed to find sanctuary in the Italian province. There has also been an exodus of young Jews leaving Livorno for Israel.

To Read Full Article Go to: http://transterramedia.com/media/17635#
Article Written by : Enrico Catassi & Raffaele Palumbo

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The Jewish community in Livorno (3 of...
Livorno, Italy
By Nili Bassan
16 Apr 2013

Jewish gravestones located at the old Jewish cemetery in Via Corallo, Livorno, Italy.

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The Jewish community in Livorno (2 of...
Livorno, Italy
By Nili Bassan
16 Apr 2013

The Jewish cemetery located at Via Corallo which is no longer in use, this cemetery was in use from 1739 until 1939.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Children who live in Shansharah ruins in the north-west of the country are acting as cadavers crawling out of the grave. When they arrived, families cleaned the graveyards of bones, foliage and detritus.

Les enfants qui vivent dans les ruines de Shansharah au nord-ouest du pays s’amusent à mimer la sortie des cadavres des tombeaux où ils vivent. Lorsqu’elles sont arrivées les familles ont nettoyé les caveaux de leurs ossements, feuillages et détritus.

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Life In The Graves
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By U.S. Editor
13 Apr 2013

In the Idlib region, North-Western Syria, hundreds of families take refuge in the "dead cities", which are Byzantine and Christian archeologic sites from the 3rd to the 6th Century.
In the Shansharah site, 80 km from Aleppo, Syrian displaced people have transformed graves into shelters: these dark and humid places are the only safe place they found to protect themselves from rockets, mortar and air attack.
Even if this part of the Idlib region has been liberated from the regime by rebels, bombings and air attacks from the Syrian army still are the daily fate of the inhabitants. Most of the Shansharah refugees are coming from Kafr Nabel and Kafr Rouma, two free cities regularly targetted by the Syrian army.
Living conditions are extremely hard in the Shansharah site : there is no electricity and running water. The closest water well is three kilometres far from the site. Displaced people go there everyday to get water. In the site there is only an ancient thermae with stagnate water that can be used to wash dishes and the clothes. Children often dive into this microbes nest. As a consequence, diseases are proliferating because of the lack of hygiene. The first disease is however coming from an insect: the leshmaniose, which gives big and red spots that erode the skin; it is spreading among Shansharah's displaced people, especially children. No organization is providing them any treatment.

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The Jewish community in Livorno (5 of...
Livorno, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

One of the many lifelong customers shopping for bread at the only bakery that makes and sells kosher bread in Livorno, Italy.

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The Jewish community in Livorno (4 of...
Livorno, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

The Jewish museum in Livorno,Italy.
Among the small collection, there are Jewish artifacts which include candlesticks, tefillin, mezuzah, and the hechal(a closet which contains the Torah scrolls) and more.
The museum is located in Villa Marini and which has been open to the public since 1992.

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Mother's Day at the Cemetery
Lima
By ric francis
12 May 2012

In Peru, Motherʼs Day is celebrated throughout the country on the second Sunday of each May much as it is elsewhere in the world: Peruvian mothers are honored with family meals, parties and showered with gifts. However, there is a particularly popular location where Peruvians gather to socialize over food and drinks in honor of their mothers: the cemetery. Thousands gather at cemeteries in celebration of deceased moms. Such was the case at The Angel Cemetery in the Barrios Altos section of Lima, Peru. Just outside the gates of the cemetery the streets were alive with vendors selling flowers and heart-shaped “Feliz Dia Mama” (Happy Motherʼs Day) balloons, to a throng of family members, both young and old. The air was filled with warmth and laughter as women, children and men entered the cemetery and sought out the grave sites of their mothers and wives. A common sight is that of men balanced on large ladders set up against multi-level mausoleums; theyʼre hired by families to clean and place flowers as well as balloons on hard-to-reach graves. While for some visiting the cemetery is a solitary event, for others it is a social gathering used to catch up on the happenings of each otherʼs lives as they celebrate memories of deceased mothers.