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The Gaza Strip, Palestine: General Fo...
Gaza
By Hind Khoudary
02 Oct 2017

The Gaza Strip is a densely populated and impoverished region inhabited primarily by Palestinian refugees; the majority live in large, overcrowded refugee camps.

Gaza Strip has been under a tight Israeli blockade for more than 11 years now. 2 million Palestinians in the coastal sliver are living in an open air jail. 

The Israeli occupation and blockade have a lot of effects on the economic and socioeconomic conditions in Gaza. 

This collection will gather different footage about Gaza Strip, the sea, people, markets, and neighborhoods. 

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WFP Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Lebanon May...
Bar Elias
By oski1980
02 May 2017

Interviews with the WFP Executive Director, Mr. David Beasley; Syrian Refugees and supporting B-Roll in Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Lebanon May 1, 2017.

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WFP B-Roll Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Leba...
Adam Camp
By oski1980
30 Apr 2017

WFP B-Roll Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Lebanon May 1, 2017

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WFP Interviews Adam Camp, Bar Elias, ...
Camp Adam
By oski1980
30 Apr 2017

WFP Interviews Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Lebanon May 1, 2017

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Ecuador resumes normal life after ear...
Pedernales
By Cristina Muñoz
15 May 2016

One month after Pedernales 7.8 earthquake, in Ecuador's coast, almost 30,000 victims try to find normality for their lives.
Though the Ecuadorian government had implemented 19 official shelters, with the aid of ACNHUR, Red Cross and friendly countries, some have decided to stay on improvised camps.
These towns, mostly inhabited by humble fishermen, will take years to rebuilt, while they turn their hopes on God. On May 16th, moved by the Catholic tradition, requiem masses will take place all over the coastal cities to remember the 660 deaths and 40 missing people

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Refugees of Tawergha
Tripoli, Libya
By Mustafa Fetouri
18 Apr 2016

Tawergha is a Libyan coastal town about 300 km west of the capital Tripoli. It used to be home to nearly 40 thousand people. After Muammar Gaddafi was toppled, thanks to the help of NATO, the militias of nearby Misrata (40 km west of Tawergha) forced the entire population of Tawergha out and completely destroyed the town.

Tawerghans are Libyan Sunni Muslims just like the rest of the population however they are black. The Misrata militias accused them of fighting for the Gaddafi regime. Since 2011 not a single Tawerghan has returned home. For the last five years they have been living in makeshift camps scattered around Libya. Four such camps, home to nearly 4000 people, are around Tripoli. These photos are of the airport road camp, home to more than 2000 men, women, & children.

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Hairstylist for the Migrants in Calais
Calais
By Steven Wassenaar
10 Feb 2016

Sabrina Lefebvre is a hairdresser who works in the world of luxury and fashion, but in her spare time she visits migrant camps in France to offer them free hair cuts. We followed her in Calais and Dunkirk, and in Paris during a fashion show.

During fashion shows and shoots for luxury magazines, she works between Paris, London, New York or Milan, styling the hair of the supermodels for well known fashion houses. Now based in London, the young woman assists the stars of her profession, like the Japanese hair stylist Akki Shirakawa. She could have been content to continue her ascent in this world of luxury, glitter and glamor.

But last October the path of this hairdresser, who is a true nomad, crossed that of the thousands of migrants who settled in make shift camps in Dunkirk and Calais, some mere miles from the village where she grew up. "I have travelled in poor regions of Brazil, and I know that in the worst circumstances, the poor strive to preserve their appearance. It is a question of dignity, it helps preserve the morale. And I decided to help them with my means."

As soon as she gets the chance, Sabrina spends a few days to settle in the camps to cut the hair of migrants. Through her work the young woman has earned an astonishing popularity within a few months: numerous people come to greet her and are and queuing in front of her makeshift barbershops along muddy roads or in tents.

Nothing discourages them, nor the icy wind, nor the mud, nor the jokes in Kurdish, Arabic or Farsi, that comment the mimicry of customers, who try to make understandable by gestures their hair cut requirements. Even more amazing, Sabrina became met with migrant colleagues; she now calls to wield the clippers or scissors at her side.

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CARE 70th Anniversary & Syrian Refugees
Gaziantep
By Mike Cerre
17 Dec 2015

November, 2015 marked the 70th anniversary of the international humanitarian organization CARE. The US-based NGO was formed in 1945, shipping boxes containing food, clothing and other aid items to Word War II refugees in Europe, the boxes that came to be known as CARE Packages.
CARE continues to provide aid to refugees, now from Syria and other areas of conflict, but the box has become a plastic debit card.

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Life in the Largest Syrian Refugee Ca...
Erbil
By Younes Mohammad
30 Mar 2015

March 30, 2015

Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan



Syrian refugees fled their country and arrived in Iraqi Kurdistan looking for assistance and a safe place to settle after the heavy clashes between the YPG and Al-Nusra front that took place in Rojava. The Kawrgosk refugee camp is currently the largest in Iraq but many of the refugees prefer to live on the outskirts of the city of Erbil. Iraq has recorded a total of 19, 844 Syrian refugees in the camps and aid is distributed to them by the UN, NGOs, and local and national bodies.

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Syrians Scrape A Living in Jordan (3 ...
65,Jordan
By Camilla Schick
12 Mar 2015

LEAD-IN MATERIAL
As Syria’s civil war enters its fifth year, nine million people have been displaced, with 3.7 million of those having fled the country. Millions of Syrian refugees are scraping by in neighboring countries.

Jordan has registered 600,000 refugees – constituting almost 10% of the Hashemite Kingdom’s total population of 6.6 million, though the actual number may be much higher. One fifth now live in refugee camps, including Za'atari camp, the second largest in the world. It's illegal for them to leave Jordan's now overcrowded and increasingly insecure refugee camps, but many are now making the leap to urban areas, seeking work and a better life. Some Syrian families who fled to Jordan at the start of the war are fairing better than others who've arrived more recently. But they’re still struggling to survive beyond the camps, without enough allowance from the UN nor local charities to pay for food and medical care, or taking their chances with working illegally.

Despite not being legally entitled to work, many have taken up jobs at local shops at the discretion of Jordanian employers, while others are too afraid to leave their homes and are surviving on as little as 13 dinars ($18) per person per month from the UN.

UN REPORT
A recent UNHCR urban report, entitled ‘Living in the Shadows’ in January this year, based on 150,000 Syrian refugees living outside of Jordan’s camps, concluded that two thirds of the refugees now in urban areas are living below Jordan’s poverty line. 1/6 are living in abject poverty barely surviving off the equivalent of 1.3 dollars per person per day. The UN has expressed grave concern that refugees are now turning desperate measures to make ends meet, with children dropping out of school and even women turning to prostitution.

JORDAN VALLEY
Khatah is a father in a community of more than 35 Syrian refugees living in UNHCR provided tents in the Jordan Valley by the Israeli border. Some of them have been living like this for 2-3 years. Most are young children. They try to earn some money working irregular days on the farms nearby, but it's not nearly enough to cover medical fees, food, and other expenses. One woman is heavily pregnant with her baby due fifteen days ago, while other adults are suffering stress and chronic illness. Khatah explains he cannot afford to pay 40-50 dinars per ID card for his family of 19 people. He wishes the fighting would stop in Syria and that they would all be able to return to them homeland one day.

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Civilians from Rebel-held Ghouta Flee...
Qudssaya,Syria
By AmmarParis
23 Feb 2015

Citizens from rebel-held Eastern Ghouta, a suburb east of Damascus, are evacuated from various villages (mainly Douma, Jobar, Jesreen and Harasta) and relocated to a refugee camp in government-controlled Dhahiyet Qudsayyah, west of Damascus, on 22 February. In the shelter, which also houses a school, they are provided with food, clothes and other basic necessities.

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Wiam Simav Bedirxan, from Cannes Film...
Atmeh camp,Syria
By AmmarParis
02 Feb 2015

Wiam Simav Bedirxan, co-director of movie "Silvered Water" that was shown at last Cannes Film Festival in France, is now back in Syria, living in Atmeh self-ruled refugees camp, where she spends time documenting the life there and teaching children of the camp English language. We have these photos done by her, as well as her comments on the photos.

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Refugees in Italy Create a Football Team
Mineo
By Jobard Olivier
24 Jan 2015

Refugees in Italy create a football club that plays in Italian official league. ASD Cara Mineo was created in 2013 after residents at a migrant reception centre began holding football tournaments among themselves. Now their team of 25 players is officially registered by the Italian football federation, and has joined the 10th tier of the football league known as Category Three. The team had to miss the first three games because players could not be registered without residence permits, which still have not arrived. But after "a little goodwill from everyone," they were allowed to participate, their spokesman told a local newspaper. Originally, the team consisted of refugee footballers from countries around Africa, who lived on 2.5 euros a day and three free meals offered them in the camps.

"Rice, pasta, fruits, it's a nice diet for a football player,” said Mohamed Traore, a 24 year-old defender who plays for the team.

Abou Daouda, 23 years old from Ghana (last photo) did not want to play with the team. He loves football but he does not like the level nor the style of the team. "Me, I play Brazilian football,” he said, so he prefers to run alone, and to stay fit following his own regime.

These young migrants dream of entering Europe legally and making a life for themselves and their families through football. So far, all of the players who started the team now live on the European continent and have secured residency.

Thousands of migrants land in Sicily each year after making the crossing from north Africa, often by boat. About 4,000 people are held at the reception centre in Mineo, which formerly housed the families of US military personnel stationed at the nearby Sigonella Nato base.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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The Refugee Crisis Continues in Iraq
Iraq
By Faysal Mortada
06 Jan 2015

Refugees from all over Iraq, who fled their homes in the wake of ISIS attacks, are now living in al Khazer camp near the Turkish border. Living conditions are hash and the refugees are suffering from a lack of food and water, and proper shelter against the winter.

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Syria: Surviving Winter in Latakia
Latakia
By Hashem
24 Nov 2014

Jabal al-Akrad, Latakia Province, Syria
November 20, 2014

Around 500 people live in a makeshift camp in Jabal al-Akrad, a hinterland area near the border with Turkey in the coastal Latakia province.
While these people are relatively safe from the fighting, they brace themselves to spend their second winter in poorly heated tents that can barely stand against the wind. Food is very scarce and there are no chances to make a decent living in this camp. To survive, the camp dwellers depend on food aid provided by residents of neighboring villages and a few humanitarian organizations.

Most of these refugees come from the neighboring Idlib province, but some have made the journey all the way from embattled Damascus suburbs of Western Ghouta.

Rebels control the Jabal al-Akrad area, while the rest of the Latakia province, home of the Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his influential Alawite community, is considered a stronghold of the Syrian regime.

Shot List
00:00 – 00:50
Several shots show refugees of different ages walking around the tents while hills could be seen in the background.
00:51- 01:06
Two medium shots show a group of people frying potatoes and making French fries sandwiches in the outdoors.
A man points at the frying pan, saying: “Film how people here are dying.”
01:07 - 01:18
Left pan movement shows firewood piled outside tents.
01:19 – 01:24
A wide shot shows a young girl standing outside a tent.
01: 25 - 01:29
A wide shot shows a toddler playing with a stick outside a tent.

01:30 – 02:21
Interview internally displaced person from Damascus suburbs of Western Ghouta (Woman, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

02:23 – 02:26
A wide shot shows a towable water tank.

02:27 – 02:31
A close-up shot shows water dripping from a towable water tank.

02:32 – 02:43
A medium shoot shows a woman and a young girl filling up water from a mobile water tank.

02:44 – 02:55
A medium shot shows a woman carrying water containers and a girl walking behind her.

02:56 – 03:06
A wide shot shows a man driving a tractor near tents.

03:07 – 03:10
A wide shot shows a man sitting behind a tractor’s steering wheel near tents.

03:11 – 03:23
A wide shot/ medium shot show children standing near a white car.

03:24 – 03:46
A wide shot shows people taking supplies from a car, while a man and a woman can be heard scourging a crying child.

03:47- 04:15
Interview with a woman who was displaced from Al-Rouj village in Idlib province (Woman, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

04:16 – 04:26
A wide shot shows a man standing next to a tent and moving a tarpaulin sheet.

04:27 – 04:38
A wide shot/ right pan movement show a woman carrying a water bucket.

04:39 – 04:51
A medium shot shows a woman cleaning seeds for cooking.

04:52 – 05:12
A wide shot shows a woman and a man fixing a tent. A voice can be heard telling the man that aid has arrived.

05:13- 05:26
A wide shot shows children playing around large bags that contain new tents. These tents will be set up to expand the camp.

05:27 – 05:36
A wide shot shows a child drinking from a towable water tank.

05:37 – 05:44
A medium shot shows smoke blowing out of a chimney pipe.

05:45 – 06:18
Interview with the camp supervisor Abdel Jabbar Khalil, a resident of a neighboring village (Man, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

06:19 – 06:26
A medium shot shows children walking between two tents.

06:27 – 06:34
A wide shot shows people walking into a tent.

06:35 – 06:58
A pan right movement shows a group of men sitting inside a tent.
A voice could be heard, saying: “Look at the tent. It could barely resist the wind.”

06:59 – 07:03
A medium shot shows a man inside the tent holding a cigarette.

07:04- 07:12
A medium shot shows two children standing at the tent’s entrance.

07:14 – 07:45
A pan left movement shows a man inside the tent playing an instrument called rababa made from an old violin.

07:46 – 13:35
Several shots show a man playing the rababa and singing a sad traditional song about a man who had to depart and leave his loved ones behind, while people sitting around him listen quietly.

Interviews

01:30 – 02:21
Interview internally displaced person from Damascus suburbs of Western Ghouta (Woman, Arabic)
“I am a Syrian refugee from the Damascus; from Western Ghouta. “We stayed in a nearby village. Warplanes used to drop their bombs near us and missiles fell at night. We could not stay at home at all, so we came to this camp. “The situation at the camp is bad. There is no firewood, and we need detergents. We need everything - currently there is nothing at the camp. “Our tents leak over us and we do not know how to manage. There is no bread or firewood. Our situation is pitiful.”

03:47 – 04:15
Interview with internally displaced person from Al-Rouj village in Idlib province (Woman, Arabic)

03:47 – 04:04
“We are refugees from Al-Rouj. Our homes and lands are gone. Our children starved and became homeless. God is our sole provider.
“We do not have food, milk, bread or diapers; we have absolutely nothing. “We are staying under the rain… our children are dying from the cold.”

04:05 – 04:15
“We are working in return for not more than100 or 200 liras [around $1 to $1.5] to provide for them [our children]. My husband has worked in cutting wood or similar jobs.”

05:45 – 06:18
Interview with the camp supervisor Abdel Jabbar Khalil, a resident of a neighboring village (Man, Arabic)
“This camp was set up to respond to urgent needs. We established it in this area that – God willing – we consider safe in order to cater for distressed people. “We provide water and some basic supplies for these people. There are 26 families who are very needy and live in a very bad situation, as you can see. “Tents are damaged during storms and rain. We brought in some tarpaulin sheets, but they are not enough.”

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Hepatitis Outbreak Amongst Syrian Ref...
Ersal
By Loujain Rabbat
11 Nov 2014

November 11 and 12, 2014
Ersal, Lebanon

Produced by: Loujain Rabbat
Filmed and Directed by: Wadih El Hayek

Syrian refugees in the town of Ersal in east Lebanon fled their war-torn country in search for security. The living conditions in Lebanon’s refugee camps, however, are far from what they would have hoped for.

The lack of sanitation infrastructure and proper medical care is believed to be behind a recent hepatitis A outbreak among refugees in Ersal. Dr. Qassem Zein, a Syrian physician who works in a local health center, estimates the number of infections is more than 1,000.

Recent clashes between the Lebanese Army and militants believed to be affiliated with ISIS and Al-Nusra Front also contributed to deteriorating the refugees’ living conditions.

Many camps were destroyed and sanitary infrastructure in the remaining ones was damaged in the fighting. The Lebanese Army has also carried out mass arrests among refugees on suspicion of hiding weapons and harboring militants. According to the physician, this deprived families of their providers and worsened their living conditions, making them more prone to disease.

Shot list:

00:00 – 00:29

Drive-by shot of Lebanese Army tanks being transported on carriers near Ersal (Archive, Aug. 2014).

00:30 – 01:15

Lebanese Army tanks heading to Ersal (Archive, Aug. 2014).

01:16 – 01: 40

Medium-wide shot/tilt down of two Syrian refugee camps in Ersal

Medium shot of Unicef tent in a Syrian refugee camp in Ersal

Close up of Unicef tent in a Syrian refugee camp in Ersal

Pan right/Medium shot of Syrian refugee camp in Ersal

Pan left/Medium shot of Syrian refugee camp in Ersal

01:41 – 01:49

Medium shot of Syrian refugees sitting outside tent

Medium-close shot of Syrian refugees sitting outside tent

Medium shot of clothes hanging to dry in Syrian refugee camp in Ersal

01:50 – 02:10

Wide shot of Syrian refugee girl in the street

Medium shot of two Syrian refugee girls crossing street

Medium/close shot of Syrian refugee girls chatting

02:11 – 02:32

Medium shot of a refugee family’s tent in Ersal with motorcycle parked outside (establishing shot for interview with a Syrian mother)

Medium shot of water tanks in front of refugee family’s tent

Close-up shot of water dripping from the water tank tap

Medium shot of water dripping from the water tank tap

02:33 – 03:23

Close-up shot of a girl filling water from the tank to make coffee

Moving shot of girl going inside tent to make coffee

Medium shot of girl lighting portable gas stove to make coffee

Close-up shot of coffee pot on portable gas stove

Medium shot of girl adding sugar to coffee pot and stirring

Close-up of coffee pot on portable gas stove

Medium shot of girl’s face

Medium shot of girl stirring coffee

Close-up shot of girl adding coffee to coffee pot and stirring

Medium shot of girl adding coffee to coffee pot and stirring

03:24 – 03:35
Interview with Um Hasan, a refugee from the Syrian city of Qussair and mother of two children infected with Hepatitis A, Arabic/ interview transcript below

03:36 – 03:41

Medium shot of a girl making coffee

03:42 – 04:38

Interview with Um Hasan, a refugee from the Syrian city of Qussair and mother of two children infected with Hepatitis A, Arabic/ interview transcript below

04:39 – 04:55

Driving shot following Abu Hasan and his son Majd on way to clinic through the streets of Ersal

04:56 – 05:20

Medium/ close-up shots of “no weapons allowed” sign on clinic door

Medium shot of two men standing outside the clinic
Medium shot of two men standing outside the clinic

05:21 – 05:26

Medium shot/ close-up shot of signs that read “Clinics for Examining Syrian Refugees in Ersal;” “Al-Bunian Health Center- Ersal. Al-Bunian Campaign- Kuwait, in cooperation with The Society of Humanitarian Cooperation – Lebanon.”

05:27 – 05:40

Interview with Majd Raed, 13-year-old male Syrian refugee infected with Hepatitis A, Arabic/ interview transcript below

05:41 – 05:49

Medium shot/ close-up shot of signs that read “Clinics for Examining Syrian Refugees in Ersal;” “Al-Bunian Health Center- Ersal. Al-Bunian Campaign- Kuwait, in cooperation with The Society of Humanitarian Cooperation – Lebanon.”

05:50 – 05:56

Cut away of Majd Raed, 13-year-old child infected with Hepatitis A – Eyes

05:57 – 06:12

Interview with Majd Raed, 13-year-old male Syrian refugee infected with Hepatitis A, Arabic/ interview transcript below

06:14 – 06:16

Cut away of Majd Raed, 13-year-old child infected with Hepatitis A – Hands

06:17 – 08:56

Interview with Dr. Qassem Zein, head of clinic for Syrian refugees in Ersal, Arabic/ interview transcript below

08:57 – 09:00

Cut-away shot of Dr. Qassem behind his desk

09:01 - 09:24

Interview with Dr. Qassem Zein, head of clinic for Syrian refugees in Ersal, Arabic/ interview transcript below

09:25 – 09:46
Cut-away shot of Dr. Qassem behind his desk

09:47 – 11:22

Interview with Dr. Qassem Zein, head of clinic for Syrian refugees in Ersal, Arabic/ interview transcript below

11:23 – 11:45

Cut-away shot of Dr. Qassem behind his desk

Interviews

Interview with Um Hasan, a refugee from the Syrian city of Qussair and mother of two children infected with Hepatitis A, Arabic

03:24 – 03:35

“Three kids are with me here – a son and daughter aged 13 and a younger 8-year-old boy –and I have a married daughter outside [in another camp in Ersal].”

03:42 – 03:56

“Mohammad [the youngest] has been sick for a month, and thank God he is now getting better. And now, my 13-year-old son has [contracted the disease]. We did the test for him and the results showed that he is infected with jaundice.”

03:57 – 04:19

“Here, where we are staying, there were two or three cases in our neighborhood. They say it could be contracted from others and from the water, or caused by lack of hygiene. Look at how we are living. I do not know how my kids caught the disease.”

04:20 – 04:38

“Sometimes, we get water from mobile tanks and we do not know its source. Most of the times we fill our tanks from the water supplied here [in Ersal] and we fill our tanks with it. And recently, we have been adding disinfectants to the water.”

Interview with Majd Raed, 13-year-old male Syrian refugee infected with Hepatitis A, Arabic

05:27 – 05:29

“[My name is] Majd Raed, I am 13 years old.”

05:30 – 05:40

“I feel dizzy and nauseated and I cannot stand up. I also feel tired and vomit, and my head hurts.”

05:50 – 05:52

“I could have contracted it from someone, or from the water we are drinking.”

05:57 – 06:12

“I take protective measures – I eat from my own plate and drink from my own glass. I eat molasses and jam and stay away from oil.”

06:17 – 06:45

Interview with Dr. Qassem Zein, head of clinic for Syrian refugees in Ersal, Arabic

“The situation is bad. Children were not getting vaccinated and there are many widespread diseases. [Parents] were not able offer treatment to their children. Medical treatment and medicines are very expensive. The [refugees] live in inhumane conditions in the camps, like the lack of a proper sewage system, drinking water grid. They are not provided with cleaning supplies and water periodically, either. All of this is causing diseases to spread.”

06:46 – 06:52

“We used to see isolated of hepatitis A; now there is an epidemic. This year, there is a real epidemic.”

06:53 – 07:41

“This epidemic spreads quickly because it is transmitted through water and shared food utensils. It turns into an epidemic especially in the circumstances under which the refugees are living – lack of proper sewage system and clean water. Vegetables are watered with waste water and then carry and spread the disease. They [refugees] are unable to maintain their hygiene because of the lack of clean water in each tent. The first day we get a child from a family, the next day we get his brother or sister. This unfortunately keeps going on.”

07:42 – 08:06

“Last month, we documented 182 cases after running tests in one month. We know that usually 30% of patients get jaundice because of hepatitis, while here around 70% of them are mistakenly diagnosed with the flu. Therefore, the number [of hepatitis A infections] in Ersal definitely exceeded 1000 cases. Unfortunately, the disease is still spreading.”

08:07 – 08:14

“Even the United Nations stopped giving cleaning supplies. A refugee is unable to buy cleaning products or medicine.”

08:15 – 08:56

“When the army entered the camps several times, all men between the ages of 13 and 75 who are able to work were arrested and beaten. Even after they are released, they need time to be rehabilitated. During this time, who will provide for these families after their main provider is taken away? This has led to great deterioration. [These men] used to provide them with water and food. In addition, there is no aid. All this led to an increase in the spread of diseases.”

09:01 - 09:20

“People who come to join ISIS or Al-Nusra Front are looking to defend an ideology and a homeland, not to stay in the camps… To them death is something they wish for; they come become martyred, as they believe.”

09:25 – 09:43

“The clashes that happened in Ersal had a huge effect not only on the relationship between the refuges and the Lebanese Army but also between them and the town’s people. We used to see isolated cases of assault against refugees. Now it happens every day, even in Beirut.”

09:47 – 10:30

“The global system is contributing to people becoming more extremist and joining ISIS and Al-Nusra Front. Unfortunately, these groups have the resources and the financial means. They are in control of some oil and gas sources and they took over the banks of Mosul. They have a lot of money and are self-sufficient now.

“On the other hand, if a soldier defected to fight for freedom and topple the regime, where will he go? He cannot feed himself and his family here cannot rent a house or even a tent to live in, so they are all forced to join Al-Nusra Front. This is the main reason, not ideology.

10:35 – 11:22

“They [ISIS and Al-Nusra Front] made a mistake. We all admit that they were 100% wrong in entering Ersal, and even they are now convinced of that. They affected as well as refugees in all of Lebanon. They played a role in spreading epidemics and diseases and the lack of food and resources for the refugees. All the problems we are facing now are because of those clashes.

“But it is wrong for the Lebanese government and the Lebanese Army, which are official institutions, to respond to a mistake with another that is even worse – to deprive people of food and medications and arrest and torture people brutally. In this case, the blame would be more on these institutions than on terrorist groups, because these groups are [inherently] wrong.

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Yazidi Children Die in Accidental Ten...
Dohuk
By rsoufi
20 Oct 2014

October 21, 2014
Dohuk, Iraq

Yazidi refugee Saido was able to save his family from certain death at the hands of ISIS by fleeing Sinjar and taking them to Khaneq refugee camp in Dohuk, Iraqi Kurdistan. However it was here in supposed safety that tragedy struck. When Saido and his wife left his brother’s tent, where they had been spending the evening, they saw their own tent on fire. By the time they got close enough there was nothing they could do but watch as their children burned to death. His three children Sima, Saman, Sebar, aged 4, 7, and 2 respectively, perished in the accidental tent fire caused by a burning candle. The bereaved father is left with just two children, one of whom is partially paralyzed and suffers from epilepsy.

Transcription:

Zahra, mother (Woman, Kurdish):

(00:56) "Sima was as old as this one [she points at a child] and Saman was as old as this one. This child is 10 months older than Sebar. I wish I died instead of them." (01:20)

Seido Shenkali, father (Man, Arabic):

(02:45) Our children were sleeping here [the same position in the other tent] with my mother and father sitting next to them. Then my wife suggested that we all go to my neighbor's tent, so we went and we left them sleeping in the tent right in front of where we were. After a while, my wife told me that we should return to the tent because it was windy and raining and the children were sleeping. So I left my neighbor's tent and walked out to find the children's tent on fire and I started screaming. I had three children, Saman, Sima, and Sebar, when we went to save them they were dead." (03:59)

(04:04) "I ask for any person who is able to help me, to do so. I do not have anything anymore. My children died, all I have left is this child who is sick and epileptic. I ask for all the officials to see my situation. I only have this boy and this girl. The boy is sick, his medications are very expensive, and i cannot get them from any governmental institution." (04:42)

(04:46) "I tried to save them from ISIS, it is all because of them. I tried to save them and brought them here, but they burned to death." (04:42)

Khedr Shenkali, uncle, (Man, Arabic):

(05:21) "There was a lit candle, and their parents were in the other tent, the tent burnt and they died." (05:38)

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Clowns In Syrian camps, a smile for ...
Erbil
By Younes Mohammad
28 Apr 2014

April, 2014
Iraqi-Kurdistan

Three clowns from Belgium entertain Syrian children in refugee camps in Iraqi-Kurdistan. The clowns belong to Clowns Without Borders, an NGO that seeks to bring moments of happiness to refugee children across the world through clown performances.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
24 Apr 2014

Darashakran Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: Students Sit ground Of One of clowns and talking with her after finish the performance.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (24 & 25 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
24 Apr 2014

Darashakran Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: One of Clowns doing performance for students.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (24 & 25 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
24 Apr 2014

Darashakran Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: One teacher and her Students Sit at the ground and look at Clowns performance behind of their school.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (24 & 25 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
23 Apr 2014

Darashakran Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: One of syrian refugee girl bring flowers for clowns in the of the their performance.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (24 & 25 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
23 Apr 2014

Darashakran Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: clowns look at flowers that refugee kids bring them after finishing their performance inside of darashakran refugees school camp.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (24 & 25 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
23 Apr 2014

Darashakran Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: One of Clowns wait outside of syrian refugee classroom for bring them to their performance.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (24 & 25 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
23 Apr 2014

Darashakran Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: one of syrian refugee girl during clowns performance between students.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (24 & 25 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
23 Apr 2014

Darashakran Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: more than four hundreds of syrian refugees kid sit at group of their school and look at clowns performance during their show.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (24 & 25 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
23 Apr 2014

Darashakran Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: some of student look at clowns performance during their show.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (24 & 25 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
23 Apr 2014

Darashakran Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: more than four hundreds of syrian refugees kid sit at group of their school and look at clowns performance during their show.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (24 & 25 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
21 Apr 2014

Kawargosk Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: syrian refugee student play with clown face after finishing his performance, they see this play inside the show at their school.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (20 & 21 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
21 Apr 2014

Kawargosk Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: One of clowns talk and play with one of syrian refugee kids during his performance.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (20 & 21 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
21 Apr 2014

Kawargosk Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: Student look at Clowns Performance in their School.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (20 & 21 April 2014) in this camp, around Six hundred Students look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
21 Apr 2014

Kawargosk Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: Student look at Clowns Performance in their School.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (20 & 21 April 2014) in this camp, around Six hundred Students look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
15 Apr 2014

Baserma Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: One of clowns doing performance for syrian students that comes from school.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (15 & 16 April 2014) in this camp, around fine hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
15 Apr 2014

Baserma Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: One of clowns doing performance for syrian students that comes from school.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (15 & 16 April 2014) in this camp, around fine hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
15 Apr 2014

Baserma Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: clowns doing performance for syrian students that comes from school.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (15 & 16 April 2014) in this camp, around fine hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
15 Apr 2014

Baserma Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: One of clowns doing performance for syrian students that comes from school.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (15 & 16 April 2014) in this camp, around fine hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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Water and Sanitary Crisis in Syrian R...
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Charaf
14 Mar 2014

Date: 14/03/2014

Location: Bekaa Valley, Lebanon

The massive arrival of Syrians in neighboring Lebanon is having an impact on Lebanon's water resources. In the Syrian refugee camps, the availability of water is insufficient for everybody, and is often contaminated. And the country is suffering this year from an exceptional drought. The Litani River has become a sewer. Moreover, the waste management is inadequate for this number of people. The mountains of accumulated waste add to the sanitary hazard during the coming months of summer, when the temperature can go up to 40 degrees Celsius.
In the neighboring Lebanese villages, the poor economy, sanitary and water problems have become nearly impossible to solve. There, Lebanese citizens now openly disapprove of the Syrian presence.

SHOT LIST

− Various shots of Al Ward camp (250 inhabitants), in the Bekaa valley, Lebanon. − Various shots of open-air sewers − Various shots of empty water bottles and reservoirs.

− Interview with Khaled Hassan, camp manager Bite 1" There is a man who has a well nearby. We buy water from him. He sent us a 1-inch hose. We are 55 families depending on this hose, apart from 200 people outside the camp. The owner of the well turns the water on for 2-3 hours a day. By the time the water gets to the end of the camp, the water has been already been turned off. Believe me, some people can't manage to get 5 or 10 liters of water daily. And some families have 10 to 15 kids. They need water for laundry, cleaning etc. And the water is not even drinkable. It's merely for cleaning purposes."

− Various shots of camp manager Khaled Hassan walking in Al Ward camp.

− Interview with Khaled Hassan, camp manager Bite 1 "Look, here is a manual toilet, as we call it. As you can see, there's no water in it. Those people don’t have water for their daily hygienic purposes, for the kids, the women, the men. Water is our biggest problem."
− Bite 2: "The sewage disposal is also problematic. We have no way to dispose of used water. We dig holes, but within a week or 10 days, they get saturated. Take a look, we dug this passage to dispose of our water. Soon, it will start to smell bad, and to carry microbes, viruses, and mosquitoes. It's problematic also because our camp is long and narrow, so sewage is difficult to dispose of. "

− Various shots of camp manager Khaled Hassan walking towards the interior of a tent. − Various shots of children drinking contaminated water.

− Interview with Sami - Syrian refugee, father of the children "Our main problem is water. We aren't drinking clean water. And our children are falling sick. I have 10 kids. They would need 3 or 4 gallons of water daily. But I'm jobless so I can't afford them. If only the water problem could be solved. Every time we drink it, we get sick. When I take the children to the doctor, he says that it's from the water. But I can't get any clean water. We have to drink the water that is provided in the water tanks."

− Shot of clothes hanging. − Various shots of representatives of an NGO visiting camp manager for assessment.

− Interview with Tatiana Kreideh, evaluation officer at "Beyond" association. "The temperature is going to rise in the summer, and the tents are very close to each other, so we expect an increase in diseases and viruses in the camps. For this reason we have already started a campaign against Typhoid and we have already ordered a stock of vaccination units".

− Interview with Saleh Smayli - member of the municipal council of the village of Gaza in the Bekaa valley. "Gaza had 5-thousand inhabitants. With the Syrian brothers, we now have 30-thousand souls. They represent a heavy burden for us. As a municipality, we do no have the capacity or the means to deal with this number."

− Various shots of Saleh Smayli in his car driving in the area of Gaza. − Various shots of Saleh Smayli on a bridge on the Litani River.

− Interview with Saleh Smayli on the bridge on the Litani River. − Bite 1: " This is the Litani River. Normally, in past years, the water would reach up to this wall. Now instead of water flowing, we have sewers, used water from the camps, because the existing infrastructure is no good. So you have only sewage, but no water. The water used to be much higher, but this year it hasn’t rained, there is drought."

− Bite 2: "We expect this year the existing wells to go dry also. There won't be enough water for everyone".

− Various shot of dry bed of Litani River and nearby camp. − Various shots of Saleh Smayli walking to a waste dump opposite the Litani River, a few meters from the camp.

− Interview of Saleh Smayli in front of the garbage dump. − Bite 1:"Just 2 months ago, we got a bulldozer and we buried all the garbage. Look, a few months later, it's already back. " − Bite 2: It's very dangerous for the refugees' health. And we, as municipalities, have very little means".

− Various shots of garbage dump, including a dead cow less than 100 meters from the camp. − Various shots of the downtown of Gaza in the Bekaa valley. − Various shots of Saleh Smayli walking in the street.

− Interview of Saleh Smayli in the streets of Gaza. − Bite 1:"We are under a heavy pressure from the Syrian presence. In every room, in every garage, you have one, two or sometimes three big families. It's a heavy pressure on all the citizens." − Bite 2: "They won't be supportive much longer. Now the people are probably thinking of the day the refugees will be gone so can finally have a break."

− Ahmad - Inhabitant of Gaza:" We can't take the Syrians anymore. We were 4-thousand people, here in the center of the village, not more than that. I am telling you the truth. Now, there are refugees everywhere. There are 17-thousand Syrians. How are we going to take it? It's not their fault, but life here has become terrible. No water, no electricity, garbage everywhere. A small garbage can could do the job at the time. Now even with a big container, you can't collect all the waste. We don't know what to do."

− Ali - Inhabitant of Gaza: "We can sell more in the shops because there are more people. But the Syrians are all unemployed, they get into fights. When you don't work, you have to steal to survive."

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Central African Republic Refugees Fle...
democratic republic of congo
By sorinfurcoi
06 Mar 2014

The Central African Republic (CAR) has experienced decades of political unrest. Violence has spiralled since the 2013, when the mostly Muslim Seleka rebels alliance
ousted President Francois Bozize. Their abuses against the majority Christian population sparked a wave of revenge attacks that led to massacres across the country.

Violence in the north east of the country and in the capital Bangui has forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes. UNHCR estimates that over 2000 people have been killed since December 2013. More than 600 000 people have been internally displaced and some 100 000 have fled to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the Republic of the Congo, Chad and Cameroon.

According to the UNHCR, the Democratic Republic of the Congo is now hosting nearly 60,000 refugees from Central African Republic. Half of them are spread across four refugee camps, while the others are living with host families.
An estimated 9000 people live in the Mole refugee camp, located on the banks of the Oubagui river, 35 kilometres from the nearest big town, Zongo, in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Nearly 10,000 refugees, both Muslims and Christians, have found refuge in the Boyabu Camp.