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Kobane Clashes
Turkish-Syria border
By Ibrahim Husseini
25 Jun 2015

Video shot from the Turkish side of the border showing smoke rising over Kobane, Syria as Kurdish YPG forces clash with Islamic State fighters.

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The Refugee Crisis Continues in Iraq
Iraq
By Faysal Mortada
06 Jan 2015

Refugees from all over Iraq, who fled their homes in the wake of ISIS attacks, are now living in al Khazer camp near the Turkish border. Living conditions are hash and the refugees are suffering from a lack of food and water, and proper shelter against the winter.

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Kobane Coming Soon
Suruç
By Felipe Passolas
08 Dec 2014

Trailer about the situation in the Turkish Kurdistan Border with Syria. Refugees and war in Kobane

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Kidnapped by ISIS and Forced to Conve...
Qamishli, Syria
By laura.lesevre
20 Oct 2014

Qamishli (Northern East Syria, close to the Turkish border): a Christian man tells when he was at the mercy of the Isis, forced to convert to Islam and threatened to be beheaded

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Yazidis Refugees Fleeing from Sinjar ...
Zakho
By rsoufi
09 Aug 2014

Location: the main road leading to Turkey in Zakho district 50 km north of the province of Dohuk.

Families of the followers of the Yazidi religion have left from Sinjar district upon Daesh's control of the land.

The refugees have confirmed that Daesh are practicing heinous acts against the Yazidis in Sinjar. That includes the murder and the slaughter of men furthermore they kidnapped more than 300 families, as well as the kidnapping of hundreds of girls and women and trapping about 100 thousand people in one of the mountains in Sinjar.

They expressed their fears of returning back to the areas that are under the control of Daesh and are demanding the international community to intervene to reduce the suffering .They talk about how the fighters are entering to their areas and slaughtering and kidnapping their people.

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Stuck Between A War & The Turkish Border
Azaz, Syria
By U.S. Editor
03 Apr 2013

In Azaz, Syria, hundreds live in UN tents sprawled across a makeshift transition camp. Though the refugees encamped here fled intense shelling in and around Aleppo, the health hazards in their new homes provide a whole new set of dangers.

Asad Hoammed, who previously worked in a weapons manufacturing facility for the Syrian government, and whose sons now fight with the opposition, is waiting in hopes that his wife may receive medical attention. She needs heart surgery, an operation only possible if they are able to cross into Turkey. Unless they are able to make the crossing soon, she will likely die within days.

Dr. Al-Nasr, who works for a group called “Medical Relief for Syria,” acknowledged that the spread of disease and lack of medical care have created a dire situation. “It’s a problem with sanitation, how to dispose of the bathing water and used toilet water,” he said. “There are lakes of waste in some areas.”

Most of the camp’s water and insect-linked health issues, such as diarrhea and scabies, are treatable. But when addressing complex civilian health emergencies, there’s simply no good option in northern Syria.

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Stuck Between A War & The Turkish Bor...
Azaz, Syria
By Ben Taub
03 Apr 2013

Transit Camp, A’zaz, SYRIA

“My wife will die if she doesn’t have heart surgery in three or four days,” Asad Hoammed lamented as he prepared tea in his UN refugee tent. But getting the operation first requires getting her out of war-torn Syria and into a Turkish hospital that would somehow be willing to treat her for free.

It’s been more than a month since Mr. Hoammed and his wife left their hometown of Tall Rifat seeking Turkish medical care, but having no money to begin a new life outside Syria has made the crossing impossible. Instead, they ended up in a refugee transit camp on the northern border with roughly 13,000 other Syrians waiting either to get into Turkey or for the war to end so they can go home and rebuild.

Most fled intense violence and shelling in and around Aleppo.

The tea was still too hot to drink, so Mr. Hoammed lit a cigarette. He took a slow drag as Syrian regime fighter jets bombed rebels laying siege to a military airport a few miles away. The distant thundering rattled none and inspired a few prayers for those likely killed, but the proximity posed no risk. Those few miles make a serious difference, as the transit camp is situated at the edge of the Turkish border. Any approaching jet would risk obliteration by Turkish air defenses.

Still, the transit camp isn’t a safe place to live. “One person is sick in every tent,” insisted the men gathered on Mr. Hoammed’s tarp floor. They blamed it on dirty drinking water.

Dr. Al-Nasr, who works for a group called “Medical Relief for Syria,” acknowledged the spread of disease is a dire situation but disputed that refugees’ drinking water is tainted in any way. “It’s a problem with sanitation, how to dispose of the bathing water and used toilet water,” he said. “There are lakes of waste in some areas.”

Most of the camp’s water and insect-linked health issues, such as diarrhea and scabies, are treatable. But when addressing complex civilian health emergencies, there’s simply no good option in northern Syria.

According to Dr. Al-Nasr, Turkish authorities will grant access and free hospital care if failure to perform a major operation would have urgent and imminent consequences. But how imminent is imminent? Mr. Hoammed thinks his wife has just a few days left to live, and that any action now may be too little, too late.

He paused for a moment, then reached for a plastic bag hanging from the tent wall from which he produced a coin-purse full of pills and a small Chinese charm sent by a business contact in Beijing two years ago. That was when his wife first fell ill. “This charm is to protect her health,” wrote the Chinese businessman.

At that time, Mr. Hoammed worked in a weapons manufacturing facility for the Syrian government. Soon after the war began, he defected and returned home to Tall Rifat. His two sons picked up arms a few months later, Abdel with the Free Syrian Army and Hamoud with Jabhat al-Nusra, the well-trained Islamist faction that also hopes to take down the Syrian regime.

Mr. Hoammed hasn’t seen his sons since he and his ill wife arrived at the transit camp in late February. Tonight he intends to plead his case and seek free crossing and heart surgery for the woman he has lived with and loved through war and peace.

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Stuck Between A War & The Turkish Bor...
Azaz, Syria
By Ben Taub
03 Apr 2013

Transit Camp, A’zaz, SYRIA

“My wife will die if she doesn’t have heart surgery in three or four days,” Asad Hoammed lamented as he prepared tea in his UN refugee tent. But getting the operation first requires getting her out of war-torn Syria and into a Turkish hospital that would somehow be willing to treat her for free.

It’s been more than a month since Mr. Hoammed and his wife left their hometown of Tall Rifat seeking Turkish medical care, but having no money to begin a new life outside Syria has made the crossing impossible. Instead, they ended up in a refugee transit camp on the northern border with roughly 13,000 other Syrians waiting either to get into Turkey or for the war to end so they can go home and rebuild.

Most fled intense violence and shelling in and around Aleppo.

The tea was still too hot to drink, so Mr. Hoammed lit a cigarette. He took a slow drag as Syrian regime fighter jets bombed rebels laying siege to a military airport a few miles away. The distant thundering rattled none and inspired a few prayers for those likely killed, but the proximity posed no risk. Those few miles make a serious difference, as the transit camp is situated at the edge of the Turkish border. Any approaching jet would risk obliteration by Turkish air defenses.

Still, the transit camp isn’t a safe place to live. “One person is sick in every tent,” insisted the men gathered on Mr. Hoammed’s tarp floor. They blamed it on dirty drinking water.

Dr. Al-Nasr, who works for a group called “Medical Relief for Syria,” acknowledged the spread of disease is a dire situation but disputed that refugees’ drinking water is tainted in any way. “It’s a problem with sanitation, how to dispose of the bathing water and used toilet water,” he said. “There are lakes of waste in some areas.”

Most of the camp’s water and insect-linked health issues, such as diarrhea and scabies, are treatable. But when addressing complex civilian health emergencies, there’s simply no good option in northern Syria.

According to Dr. Al-Nasr, Turkish authorities will grant access and free hospital care if failure to perform a major operation would have urgent and imminent consequences. But how imminent is imminent? Mr. Hoammed thinks his wife has just a few days left to live, and that any action now may be too little, too late.

He paused for a moment, then reached for a plastic bag hanging from the tent wall from which he produced a coin-purse full of pills and a small Chinese charm sent by a business contact in Beijing two years ago. That was when his wife first fell ill. “This charm is to protect her health,” wrote the Chinese businessman.

At that time, Mr. Hoammed worked in a weapons manufacturing facility for the Syrian government. Soon after the war began, he defected and returned home to Tall Rifat. His two sons picked up arms a few months later, Abdel with the Free Syrian Army and Hamoud with Jabhat al-Nusra, the well-trained Islamist faction that also hopes to take down the Syrian regime.

Mr. Hoammed hasn’t seen his sons since he and his ill wife arrived at the transit camp in late February. Tonight he intends to plead his case and seek free crossing and heart surgery for the woman he has lived with and loved through war and peace.

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Stuck Between A War & The Turkish Bor...
Azaz, Syria
By Ben Taub
03 Apr 2013

Transit Camp, A’zaz, SYRIA

“My wife will die if she doesn’t have heart surgery in three or four days,” Asad Hoammed lamented as he prepared tea in his UN refugee tent. But getting the operation first requires getting her out of war-torn Syria and into a Turkish hospital that would somehow be willing to treat her for free.

It’s been more than a month since Mr. Hoammed and his wife left their hometown of Tall Rifat seeking Turkish medical care, but having no money to begin a new life outside Syria has made the crossing impossible. Instead, they ended up in a refugee transit camp on the northern border with roughly 13,000 other Syrians waiting either to get into Turkey or for the war to end so they can go home and rebuild.

Most fled intense violence and shelling in and around Aleppo.

The tea was still too hot to drink, so Mr. Hoammed lit a cigarette. He took a slow drag as Syrian regime fighter jets bombed rebels laying siege to a military airport a few miles away. The distant thundering rattled none and inspired a few prayers for those likely killed, but the proximity posed no risk. Those few miles make a serious difference, as the transit camp is situated at the edge of the Turkish border. Any approaching jet would risk obliteration by Turkish air defenses.

Still, the transit camp isn’t a safe place to live. “One person is sick in every tent,” insisted the men gathered on Mr. Hoammed’s tarp floor. They blamed it on dirty drinking water.

Dr. Al-Nasr, who works for a group called “Medical Relief for Syria,” acknowledged the spread of disease is a dire situation but disputed that refugees’ drinking water is tainted in any way. “It’s a problem with sanitation, how to dispose of the bathing water and used toilet water,” he said. “There are lakes of waste in some areas.”

Most of the camp’s water and insect-linked health issues, such as diarrhea and scabies, are treatable. But when addressing complex civilian health emergencies, there’s simply no good option in northern Syria.

According to Dr. Al-Nasr, Turkish authorities will grant access and free hospital care if failure to perform a major operation would have urgent and imminent consequences. But how imminent is imminent? Mr. Hoammed thinks his wife has just a few days left to live, and that any action now may be too little, too late.

He paused for a moment, then reached for a plastic bag hanging from the tent wall from which he produced a coin-purse full of pills and a small Chinese charm sent by a business contact in Beijing two years ago. That was when his wife first fell ill. “This charm is to protect her health,” wrote the Chinese businessman.

At that time, Mr. Hoammed worked in a weapons manufacturing facility for the Syrian government. Soon after the war began, he defected and returned home to Tall Rifat. His two sons picked up arms a few months later, Abdel with the Free Syrian Army and Hamoud with Jabhat al-Nusra, the well-trained Islamist faction that also hopes to take down the Syrian regime.

Mr. Hoammed hasn’t seen his sons since he and his ill wife arrived at the transit camp in late February. Tonight he intends to plead his case and seek free crossing and heart surgery for the woman he has lived with and loved through war and peace.

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Stuck Between A War & The Turkish Bor...
Azaz, Syria
By Ben Taub
03 Apr 2013

Transit Camp, A’zaz, SYRIA

“My wife will die if she doesn’t have heart surgery in three or four days,” Asad Hoammed lamented as he prepared tea in his UN refugee tent. But getting the operation first requires getting her out of war-torn Syria and into a Turkish hospital that would somehow be willing to treat her for free.

It’s been more than a month since Mr. Hoammed and his wife left their hometown of Tall Rifat seeking Turkish medical care, but having no money to begin a new life outside Syria has made the crossing impossible. Instead, they ended up in a refugee transit camp on the northern border with roughly 13,000 other Syrians waiting either to get into Turkey or for the war to end so they can go home and rebuild.

Most fled intense violence and shelling in and around Aleppo.

The tea was still too hot to drink, so Mr. Hoammed lit a cigarette. He took a slow drag as Syrian regime fighter jets bombed rebels laying siege to a military airport a few miles away. The distant thundering rattled none and inspired a few prayers for those likely killed, but the proximity posed no risk. Those few miles make a serious difference, as the transit camp is situated at the edge of the Turkish border. Any approaching jet would risk obliteration by Turkish air defenses.

Still, the transit camp isn’t a safe place to live. “One person is sick in every tent,” insisted the men gathered on Mr. Hoammed’s tarp floor. They blamed it on dirty drinking water.

Dr. Al-Nasr, who works for a group called “Medical Relief for Syria,” acknowledged the spread of disease is a dire situation but disputed that refugees’ drinking water is tainted in any way. “It’s a problem with sanitation, how to dispose of the bathing water and used toilet water,” he said. “There are lakes of waste in some areas.”

Most of the camp’s water and insect-linked health issues, such as diarrhea and scabies, are treatable. But when addressing complex civilian health emergencies, there’s simply no good option in northern Syria.

According to Dr. Al-Nasr, Turkish authorities will grant access and free hospital care if failure to perform a major operation would have urgent and imminent consequences. But how imminent is imminent? Mr. Hoammed thinks his wife has just a few days left to live, and that any action now may be too little, too late.

He paused for a moment, then reached for a plastic bag hanging from the tent wall from which he produced a coin-purse full of pills and a small Chinese charm sent by a business contact in Beijing two years ago. That was when his wife first fell ill. “This charm is to protect her health,” wrote the Chinese businessman.

At that time, Mr. Hoammed worked in a weapons manufacturing facility for the Syrian government. Soon after the war began, he defected and returned home to Tall Rifat. His two sons picked up arms a few months later, Abdel with the Free Syrian Army and Hamoud with Jabhat al-Nusra, the well-trained Islamist faction that also hopes to take down the Syrian regime.

Mr. Hoammed hasn’t seen his sons since he and his ill wife arrived at the transit camp in late February. Tonight he intends to plead his case and seek free crossing and heart surgery for the woman he has lived with and loved through war and peace.

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Stuck Between A War & The Turkish Bor...
Azaz, Syria
By Ben Taub
03 Apr 2013

Transit Camp, A’zaz, SYRIA

“My wife will die if she doesn’t have heart surgery in three or four days,” Asad Hoammed lamented as he prepared tea in his UN refugee tent. But getting the operation first requires getting her out of war-torn Syria and into a Turkish hospital that would somehow be willing to treat her for free.

It’s been more than a month since Mr. Hoammed and his wife left their hometown of Tall Rifat seeking Turkish medical care, but having no money to begin a new life outside Syria has made the crossing impossible. Instead, they ended up in a refugee transit camp on the northern border with roughly 13,000 other Syrians waiting either to get into Turkey or for the war to end so they can go home and rebuild.

Most fled intense violence and shelling in and around Aleppo.

The tea was still too hot to drink, so Mr. Hoammed lit a cigarette. He took a slow drag as Syrian regime fighter jets bombed rebels laying siege to a military airport a few miles away. The distant thundering rattled none and inspired a few prayers for those likely killed, but the proximity posed no risk. Those few miles make a serious difference, as the transit camp is situated at the edge of the Turkish border. Any approaching jet would risk obliteration by Turkish air defenses.

Still, the transit camp isn’t a safe place to live. “One person is sick in every tent,” insisted the men gathered on Mr. Hoammed’s tarp floor. They blamed it on dirty drinking water.

Dr. Al-Nasr, who works for a group called “Medical Relief for Syria,” acknowledged the spread of disease is a dire situation but disputed that refugees’ drinking water is tainted in any way. “It’s a problem with sanitation, how to dispose of the bathing water and used toilet water,” he said. “There are lakes of waste in some areas.”

Most of the camp’s water and insect-linked health issues, such as diarrhea and scabies, are treatable. But when addressing complex civilian health emergencies, there’s simply no good option in northern Syria.

According to Dr. Al-Nasr, Turkish authorities will grant access and free hospital care if failure to perform a major operation would have urgent and imminent consequences. But how imminent is imminent? Mr. Hoammed thinks his wife has just a few days left to live, and that any action now may be too little, too late.

He paused for a moment, then reached for a plastic bag hanging from the tent wall from which he produced a coin-purse full of pills and a small Chinese charm sent by a business contact in Beijing two years ago. That was when his wife first fell ill. “This charm is to protect her health,” wrote the Chinese businessman.

At that time, Mr. Hoammed worked in a weapons manufacturing facility for the Syrian government. Soon after the war began, he defected and returned home to Tall Rifat. His two sons picked up arms a few months later, Abdel with the Free Syrian Army and Hamoud with Jabhat al-Nusra, the well-trained Islamist faction that also hopes to take down the Syrian regime.

Mr. Hoammed hasn’t seen his sons since he and his ill wife arrived at the transit camp in late February. Tonight he intends to plead his case and seek free crossing and heart surgery for the woman he has lived with and loved through war and peace.

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Syria - Protest in refugee camp of Az...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugees of the Azaz camp, Syria, protest for to get better conditions of life in the camp. Refugees of the camp of Azaz have lost their houses under bombings of Halep and surroundings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at time of bombing. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. After more than three months living under tents, with no heating, no electricity, little food, wet conditions, a group of them has arranged a protest. They moved towards the Turkish border, crossing the no mans land and entering de facto in Turkey. They asked for better living conditions in the Azaz camp.
Traffic was jammed. Syrian refugees tried to stop all cars willing to cross the border, just allowing an ambulance to pass through. Turkish police moved to calm the situation, keeping great calm, even if a Turkish tank was moved on the border line just to say "pay attention".
An ambassador was sent by the governor of the area, to parliament for to have access to Turkey. He returned with no good news. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp. Ruefully they make return to the camp by night.

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Syria - Protest in refugee camp of Az...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugees of the Azaz camp, Syria, protest for to get better conditions of life in the camp. Refugees of the camp of Azaz have lost their houses under bombings of Halep and surroundings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at time of bombing. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. After more than three months living under tents, with no heating, no electricity, little food, wet conditions, a group of them has arranged a protest. They moved towards the Turkish border, crossing the no mans land and entering de facto in Turkey. They asked for better living conditions in the Azaz camp.
Traffic was jammed. Syrian refugees tried to stop all cars willing to cross the border, just allowing an ambulance to pass through. Turkish police moved to calm the situation, keeping great calm, even if a Turkish tank was moved on the border line just to say "pay attention".
An ambassador was sent by the governor of the area, to parliament for to have access to Turkey. He returned with no good news. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp. Ruefully they make return to the camp by night.

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Syria - Protest in refugee camp of Az...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugees of the Azaz camp, Syria, protest for to get better conditions of life in the camp. Refugees of the camp of Azaz have lost their houses under bombings of Halep and surroundings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at time of bombing. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. After more than three months living under tents, with no heating, no electricity, little food, wet conditions, a group of them has arranged a protest. They moved towards the Turkish border, crossing the no mans land and entering de facto in Turkey. They asked for better living conditions in the Azaz camp.
Traffic was jammed. Syrian refugees tried to stop all cars willing to cross the border, just allowing an ambulance to pass through. Turkish police moved to calm the situation, keeping great calm, even if a Turkish tank was moved on the border line just to say "pay attention".
An ambassador was sent by the governor of the area, to parliament for to have access to Turkey. He returned with no good news. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp. Ruefully they make return to the camp by night.

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Syria - Protest in refugee camp of Az...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugees of the Azaz camp, Syria, protest for to get better conditions of life in the camp. Refugees of the camp of Azaz have lost their houses under bombings of Halep and surroundings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at time of bombing. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. After more than three months living under tents, with no heating, no electricity, little food, wet conditions, a group of them has arranged a protest. They moved towards the Turkish border, crossing the no mans land and entering de facto in Turkey. They asked for better living conditions in the Azaz camp.
Traffic was jammed. Syrian refugees tried to stop all cars willing to cross the border, just allowing an ambulance to pass through. Turkish police moved to calm the situation, keeping great calm, even if a Turkish tank was moved on the border line just to say "pay attention".
An ambassador was sent by the governor of the area, to parliament for to have access to Turkey. He returned with no good news. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp. Ruefully they make return to the camp by night.

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Syria - Protest in refugee camp of Az...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Yassar Karum, from Salahaddin, Halep, one of the leaders of the refugees of the Azaz camp, Syria. Protest for to get better conditions of life in the camp. Refugees of the camp of Azaz have lost their houses under bombings of Halep and surroundings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at time of bombing. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. After more than three months living under tents, with no heating, no electricity, little food, wet conditions, a group of them has arranged a protest. They moved towards the Turkish border, crossing the no mans land and entering de facto in Turkey. They asked for better living conditions in the Azaz camp.
Traffic was jammed. Syrian refugees tried to stop all cars willing to cross the border, just allowing an ambulance to pass through. Turkish police moved to calm the situation, keeping great calm, even if a Turkish tank was moved on the border line just to say "pay attention".
An ambassador was sent by the governor of the area, to parliament for to have access to Turkey. He returned with no good news. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp. Ruefully they make return to the camp by night.

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Syria - Protest in refugee camp of Az...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugees of the Azaz camp, Syria, protest for to get better conditions of life in the camp. Refugees of the camp of Azaz have lost their houses under bombings of Halep and surroundings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at time of bombing. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. After more than three months living under tents, with no heating, no electricity, little food, wet conditions, a group of them has arranged a protest. They moved towards the Turkish border, crossing the no mans land and entering de facto in Turkey. They asked for better living conditions in the Azaz camp.
Traffic was jammed. Syrian refugees tried to stop all cars willing to cross the border, just allowing an ambulance to pass through. Turkish police moved to calm the situation, keeping great calm, even if a Turkish tank was moved on the border line just to say "pay attention".
An ambassador was sent by the governor of the area, to parliament for to have access to Turkey. He returned with no good news. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp. Ruefully they make return to the camp by night.

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Syria - Protest in refugee camp of Az...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugees of the Azaz camp, Syria, protest for to get better conditions of life in the camp. Refugees of the camp of Azaz have lost their houses under bombings of Halep and surroundings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at time of bombing. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. After more than three months living under tents, with no heating, no electricity, little food, wet conditions, a group of them has arranged a protest. They moved towards the Turkish border, crossing the no mans land and entering de facto in Turkey. They asked for better living conditions in the Azaz camp.
Traffic was jammed. Syrian refugees tried to stop all cars willing to cross the border, just allowing an ambulance to pass through. Turkish police moved to calm the situation, keeping great calm, even if a Turkish tank was moved on the border line just to say "pay attention".
An ambassador was sent by the governor of the area, to parliament for to have access to Turkey. He returned with no good news. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp. Ruefully they make return to the camp by night.

Thumb sm
Syria - Protest in refugeee camp of A...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugees of the Azaz camp, Syria, protest for to get better conditions of life in the camp. Refugees of the camp of Azaz have lost their houses under bombings of Halep and surroundings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at time of bombing. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. After more than three months living under tents, with no heating, no electricity, little food, wet conditions, a group of them has arranged a protest. They moved towards the Turkish border, crossing the no mans land and entering de facto in Turkey. They asked for better living conditions in the Azaz camp.
Traffic was jammed. Syrian refugees tried to stop all cars willing to cross the border, just allowing an ambulance to pass through. Turkish police moved to calm the situation, keeping great calm, even if a Turkish tank was moved on the border line just to say "pay attention".
An ambassador was sent by the governor of the area, to parliament for to have access to Turkey. He returned with no good news. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp. Ruefully they make return to the camp by night.

Thumb sm
Syria - Protest in refugeee camp of A...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugees of the Azaz camp, Syria, protest for to get better conditions of life in the camp. Refugees of the camp of Azaz have lost their houses under bombings of Halep and surroundings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at time of bombing. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. After more than three months living under tents, with no heating, no electricity, little food, wet conditions, a group of them has arranged a protest. They moved towards the Turkish border, crossing the no mans land and entering de facto in Turkey. They asked for better living conditions in the Azaz camp.
Traffic was jammed. Syrian refugees tried to stop all cars willing to cross the border, just allowing an ambulance to pass through. Turkish police moved to calm the situation, keeping great calm, even if a Turkish tank was moved on the border line just to say "pay attention".
An ambassador was sent by the governor of the area, to parliament for to have access to Turkey. He returned with no good news. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp. Ruefully they make return to the camp by night.

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Syria - Protest in refugeee camp of A...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugees of the Azaz camp, Syria, protest for to get better conditions of life in the camp. Refugees of the camp of Azaz have lost their houses under bombings of Halep and surroundings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at time of bombing. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. After more than three months living under tents, with no heating, no electricity, little food, wet conditions, a group of them has arranged a protest. They moved towards the Turkish border, crossing the no mans land and entering de facto in Turkey. They asked for better living conditions in the Azaz camp.
Traffic was jammed. Syrian refugees tried to stop all cars willing to cross the border, just allowing an ambulance to pass through. Turkish police moved to calm the situation, keeping great calm, even if a Turkish tank was moved on the border line just to say "pay attention".
An ambassador was sent by the governor of the area, to parliament for to have access to Turkey. He returned with no good news. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp. Ruefully they make return to the camp by night.

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Syria - Protest in refugeee camp of A...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugees of the Azaz camp, Syria, protest for to get better conditions of life in the camp. Refugees of the camp of Azaz have lost their houses under bombings of Halep and surroundings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at time of bombing. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. After more than three months living under tents, with no heating, no electricity, little food, wet conditions, a group of them has arranged a protest. They moved towards the Turkish border, crossing the no mans land and entering de facto in Turkey. They asked for better living conditions in the Azaz camp.
Traffic was jammed. Syrian refugees tried to stop all cars willing to cross the border, just allowing an ambulance to pass through. Turkish police moved to calm the situation, keeping great calm, even if a Turkish tank was moved on the border line just to say "pay attention".
An ambassador was sent by the governor of the area, to parliament for to have access to Turkey. He returned with no good news. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp. Ruefully they make return to the camp by night.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where

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Azaz Camp, Syria (1 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (4 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (16 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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SYRIA - PROTEST IN THE REFUGEES CAMP ...
Azaz, Syria
By Mais Istanbuli
06 Dec 2012

Refugees of the Azaz camp, Syria, protest for to get better conditions of life in the camp. Refugees of the camp of Azaz have lost their houses under bombings of Halep and surroundings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at time of bombing. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. After more than three months living under tents, with no heating, no electricity, little food, wet conditions, a group of them has arranged a protest. They moved towards the Turkish border, crossing the no mans land and entering de facto in Turkey. They asked for better living conditions in the Azaz camp.
Traffic was jammed. Syrian refugees tried to stop all cars willing to cross the border, just allowing an ambulance to pass through. Turkish police moved to calm the situation, keeping great calm, even if a Turkish tank was moved on the border line just to say "pay attention".
An ambassador was sent by the governor of the area, to parliament for to have access to Turkey. He returned with no good news. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp. Ruefully they make return to the camp by night.

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Azaz Camp, Syria
Azaz, Syria
By U.S. Editor
02 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.