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Beirut Scenic and Street Shots
Beirut, Lebanon
By mchreyteh
05 Feb 2016

Various shots of Beirut streets, people using smart phones and walking in Beirut Souks shopping center.

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Manila Street Scene
Manila
By Ralf Falbe
09 May 2015

Traffic on Mabini Street in the Ermita District, Manila, Philippines.

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Thousands Queue Amidst Fuel Shortage ...
Sanaa
By assamawy
03 Apr 2015

The impact of the ongoing war on Yemen's people has now begun to appear in the form of extremely long lines outside of gas stations. Sana'a, which has around 3m people, has suffered from fuel shortages for several months out of the past year. People not only use fuel for cars, but also for home generators since the country has no stable electricity and electricity cuts can last for more than 12 hours a day. As such, people depend mainly on personal generators to lighten the dark nights. Though expensive, the people of Yemeni have no other options.

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Aftermath of Air Attacks on Sanaa
Sanaa
By Dhaifallah Homran
26 Mar 2015

March 26, 2015
Sanaa, Yemen

Video shows the aftermath of an airstrike on the residential neighborhood of Bani Hawwat near the international airport of Sanaa. At least one dead body appears buried under the rubble.

A coalition led by Saudi Arabia launched air attacks against Houthi-held locations on March 26 at midnight . According to local sources, at least 10 people were killed and four fighter jets were destroyed in the attacks.

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Ukraine Conflict: Kramatorsk Shelling
Kramatorsk, Ukraine
By Maria Zaviialova
10 Feb 2015

An ATO forward operating post was shelled near the town of Kramatorsk, causing casualties and damage to vehicles and roads.

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Civilians Killed in Kramatorsk Shelling
Kramatorsk, Ukraine
By Maria Zaviialova
10 Feb 2015

Kramatorsk was the scene of heavy shelling and rocket attacks, according to Ukrainian President Poroshenko from pro-Russian rebels, on February 10. The shelling killed twelve civilians and wounded more than 30.

Just days ahead of peace talks scheduled to take place in Minsk, pro-Russian separatists and Ukrainian forces saw another round of heavy clashes. Both sides claim to have made gains during the battles.

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Nightlife Is Back in Baghdad
Baghdad
By Mazin Munther Jawad
08 Feb 2015

Baghdad, Iraq

February 8, 2014

A night curfew that was imposed on Baghdad for 10 years was lifted on Sunday, February 8, allowing people to take to the street and celebrate.
Iraqi Prime Minister Haidar al-Abbadi ordered the end of the curfew that was usually enforced between midnight and 5 am. Security checkpoints were also removed, which allowed people to circulate more easily.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT
Various of cars driving at night
Various of fountain in main square
Wide of traffic policeman
Various of cars driving by
Various of people sitting in street café

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ali Nashmi, Iraqi Historian
04:45 – 05:21
“Baghdad has witnessed a night curfew for many years. It was important because bombings used to take place during gatherings and rush hours. The lack of heavy traffic during the night did not mean that there would be no bombings. Some military positions were targeted. Lifting the curfew means that a heavy burden is lifted off citizens’ shoulders, especially the ill and those who returned from abroad. I think it was a right decision that gives moral and political support to the people, who have been suffering for more than 10 years.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ahmad Ali, Resident of Baghdad
05:22 – 05:43
“I think that lifting the curfew is a good decision. I can see that activity in Baghdad is normal. Those who are sick or traveling can go out at any time during the night. Traffic is normal at this time of the night.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Anas Abdel Rahim, Resident of Baghdad
05:44 – 06:06
“This is something positive, especially for employees, who are tired and want to have some recreation at night. The curfew is over. As you can see, we went out on the first day of lifting the curfew. This is something positive. We wish that Baghdad returns to its previous state.”

Various/ Traveling of street from inside a car

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Vigilantes Shame Parking Violators in...
Svobody Avenue, 24, L'viv, Lviv Oblast,Ukraine
By Yura_Melko
03 Jan 2015

“Let me pass by!” is the rallying cry of a group of young activists fighting for pedestrian space in Lviv, Ukraine. Every weekend the group of teenagers gather in the city centre not for fun, but to make a “Stop Kham”(“Stop-brute” in Ukranian) raid. They look for illegally parked cars and politely gang-up on drivers to try to convince them to get their vehicles off of sidewalks and out of crosswalks.

One of the heads of the movement, Roman Tymchyshyn, 17, says that more than half of drivers treat the movement positively and are willing to change parking spots. If a driver refuses to do so, activists put a “shame” sticker on their windshield. The main violators are taxi drivers who park their cars in intersections, on the sidewalk and even in bicycle lanes. Such people, according to Roman are the most dangerous. They treat “Stop kham” aggressively and consider the young activists to be hooligans who have nothing to do. On the other hand, taxi drivers claim that they have parked their cabs like that for a long time and rebuke the municipality for the lack of taxi parking spaces.

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Gazans Use Propane to Fuel Cars (Shor...
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
05 Nov 2014

Gaza, Palestinian Territories
November 4, 2014

The ongoing Israeli blockade on the Gaza Strip and the recent closure of most the tunnels used for smuggling goods from Egypt has led to a severe fuel shortage. As a result, some Gazans are modifying their car engines and generators to make them run on propane instead of gasoline. Propane is widely used for cooking in Gaza.

Shot list:

00:00 – 00:05
A general shot shows cars driving in both directions on a main road in Gaza City.

00:06 – 00:11
A close shot shows the exhaust pipe of a taxi as it drives away.

00:12 – 00:18
A medium shot shows many parked taxis and men standing and chatting; a female passenger gets out of one of them.

00:19 – 00:20
A medium shot shows a street-food shop.

00:21 – 00:27
A medium shot shows the same street-food shop from a different angle.

00:31- 0:34
A medium shot shows an electric generator running and connected to a gas canister.

00:35 – 01:01
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic/ interview transcript below

01:02 – 01:07
A medium shot shows Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner at work.

01:08- 01:10
A wide shot shows the façade of Daban Company for gas supply.

01:11- 00:14 A medium shot shows two men standing and another around gas canisters.

00:14 – 00:19
A pan right movement shows a man carrying a gas canister.

00: 20 – 00:34
Traveling shot from inside a taxi shows the car stopping to pick up a female passenger.

00:35-01:53
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver/ interview transcript below

01:54 – 02:06
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic/ interview transcript below

02:07 – 02:40
Interview with Ayman Seidam, a mechanic, Arabic/ interview transcript below

02:41- 03:35
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan/ interview transcript below

Interviews

00:35 – 01:01
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic
“Because of the gasoline shortage, you have to use propane to fuel electric generators and carry on with your work… There are power shortages that could last from six to seven hours and the power is on during the night while you cannot work. You have to use any alternative kind of fuel to keep working.”

00:35-01:53
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver
“I altered the car because of the gasoline shortage... In the past, we used to get gasoline through tunnels from Egypt, but they were closed about a year ago, so we switched to propane to save money.”

01:54 – 02:06
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic

-Do you know that this car is running on gas?

-Yes, I know.

-What do you think of that?

-This is normal, because there is no gasoline but [propane] is available.

02:07 – 02:40
Interview with Ayman Seidam, a mechanic, Arabic
“I am disconnecting the filter because I want to set the propane machine. It is not working properly. The propane machine does not change the engine; it only stops the flow of gasoline. Gasoline is expensive here, so people have to switch to using propane. We install a small device to pump propane instead of gasoline into the engine using the injection system. “This is the propane device. It is made in Turkey and called Fima.”

02:41- 03:35
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan, Arabic
“Altering taxis to make them run on propane is against the law, but due to the siege on the Gaza Strip and the large assault against the Palestinian people that comes with it, many taxi drivers are customizing their cars to make them run on propane. It is against the law and the ministry of transportation does allow the installation of propane pipes in cars because it is dangerous… for the passengers. The ministry of transportation, in cooperation with the traffic police, is trying to resolve this problem by monitoring people who buy propane pipes [used in altering vehicles].

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By Rustom Seegopaul
20 May 2014

A Cuban woman driving in the streets of downtown Havana. Many other old American cars also pass through this busy neighborhood.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
20 May 2014

Three vintage American cars wait at a traffic light in Havana, Cuba.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
20 May 2014

A car speeding up to beat an upcoming traffic light in one of the most touristic streets of downtown Havana, Cuba.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
20 May 2014

A vintage car from the 1950's drives down one of the many streets in Old Havana, Cuba.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
20 May 2014

An old car stops at a toll station in Varadero, Cuba.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
29 Jul 2013

A 'limousine-taxi' stops on the side of one of the major roads in Havana, Cuba. In the past, this car would have been used to transport important people, but it is now used as a public transportation that can transport many people at the same time.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
29 Jul 2013

A testament to changing times, a vintage American car is parked next to a new generation of automobiles in Cuba. With the new law allowing car importations in the country, people are opting for more modern vehicles.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
28 Jul 2013

A Cuban woman looks out of the window of an old taxi in Havana. Its condition is far from the Ferrari logo it displays.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
27 Jul 2013

This gas station in Varadero is a popular stop for vehicles going to and coming from Havana. The vintage cars from the 1960's and before are being seen less and less as newer cars are becoming more accessible and popular in Cuba

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By Rustom Seegopaul
27 Jul 2013

A variety of vintage cars can be seen at the beach in Cuba.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
27 Jul 2013

This engine - and the car it is in - tells a story of ingenuity and resilience. With the embargo, spare parts are hard to come by in Cuba. As a result, car owners have to find ingenious ways to repair their vehicles.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
27 Jul 2013

The owner of this old Ford pickup explains that he uses his car to make extra money by transporting goods and people. "Yesterday I was helping a man bring avocados to the city, but today I am taking a family to the seaside," he says.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
27 Jul 2013

This old pickup, like many vintage vehicles in Cuba, has seen better days. "I have replaced many of the parts with different vehicles," the owner explains. "Original parts for this kind of truck are almost impossible to find."

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By Rustom Seegopaul
27 Jul 2013

This old Opel sits on a Havana sidewalk. Its driver has gone off to run an errand. Its faded paint bears witness to the many years it has spent in the street of Havana.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
26 Jul 2013

'Crazy in love,' in Spanish is painted on the back of this old car, driving through Havana, Cuba.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
26 Jul 2013

A license plate on a vintage car in Havana, Cuba.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
26 Jul 2013

A car waits in traffic near one of the old forts in Havana.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
26 Jul 2013

Two vintage cars are painted in a similar ways in the parking lot of a hotel. Vintage cars are sometimes painted in creative ways.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
26 Jul 2013

Two tourists driving with the top down are cruising through Havana in an old American car. These vintage cars the tourists's favorites in Cuba.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
26 Jul 2013

Well kept, well painted, classic cars are parked in line in one of the central touristic areas in central Havana. Only a few cars from before the 1960's have been kept in such an immaculate condition. These vintage cars cater specifically for tourists.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
26 Jul 2013

An old American car drives down a street in downtown Havana.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
26 Jul 2013

People walking in the streets of old Havana. Most of the cars in this area are taxis.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
26 Jul 2013

Cars from different eras are seen driving on a highway in Havana. Buses are used more than cars outside of Havana. Most Cuban people use public transport, especially for long distances.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
26 Jul 2013

A Cuban man drives tourists in Havana in a borrowed car as a way to make extra money.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
25 Jul 2013

Many vintaged cars are used in the tourism industry. Vintage taxis cater primarily for tourists in Cuba.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
25 Jul 2013

These vintage and modern cars waiting in line illustrate the recent changes in Cuba. After decades of restrictions making it almost impossible to import new vehicles, Cuba finally decided to opening its domestic car market to imports.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
25 Jul 2013

The owner of this car adjusts wires under the hood of his car, a ritual he needs to perform to get the car to start. The lack of spare parts (due to the trade embargo) coupled with the age and deterioration of most of these pre-1960's cars and makes maintenance and repair difficult.

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Cuba's Iconic Vintage Cars
Havana, Cuba
By Rustom Seegopaul
25 Jul 2013

HAVANA, CUBA - For half a century, Havana's roads have been jammed by stylishly painted pre-1960s Pontiacs, Studebakers, Oldsmobiles, Chevrolets and Soviet imports. But after decades of restrictions making it almost impossible to import new vehicles, Cuba finally decided to opening its domestic car market to imports. Many believe this economic reform will put an end to an era symbolized the the country's symbolic vintage automobiles.

While the new law eliminates the need for a permit, it does not allow Cubans to import automobiles themselves. The government maintains a monopoly on the retail sale of cars and remains the only one dictating a vehicle's market value.

Cuba's vintage cars are famous around the world, but maintaining them has become a real burden for their owners. One driver explains that after saving a lot of money, he managed to buy and install a Hyundai engine in his old, red Chevy. “It still gives me problems, but not as many as before,” he explains.

About 150 000 Chevy were in circulation in Cuba when the 1959 revolution occurred. The subsequent embargo saw all car imports from the United States halted.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
25 Jul 2013

Casually parked on the side of the road, this car looks very much like its surroundings in Old Havana - old, dilapidated and forgotten.

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By Rustom Seegopaul
25 Jul 2013

Standing as a testament to the embargo, this car, made before the 1960's and still very much functional, sits on the side walk in Havana. Many of these cars, in more or less good condition, can still be seen in the streets of Havana.

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Miyagi, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

Piled up cars which were destroyed by the tsunami.

Ishinomaki, Miyagi, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013