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Spills & Curses (15 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

Freeborn Roland excavates spoiled cassava crop as a result of spilled crude from Royal Dutch Shell facility near his home in Ikrama community in the oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria.

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Manual Labour
Yenagoa, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
08 May 2013

A woman chopping down cassava plants from the proposed site of the 1st Film school In Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria

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Children of the guaranà 01
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
27 Mar 2013

The SaterŽ-MawŽ tribe lives in the region of the mid Amazon River, on the border between Amazonas and Par‡ states. Inventors of the "Guaran‡ culture", the tribe domesticated this wild fruit and created its processing method, thanks to which Guaran‡ is known and consumed all over the world.

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Children of the guaranà 02
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
27 Mar 2013

Known as to locals as "the Children of Guaran‡" the Satere-Mawe indians still maintain their traditional way of planting and using guaran‡, for example as medicine or their ritual drink.

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Children of the guaranà 04
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
27 Mar 2013

Pedro, 33, a SaterŽ-MawŽ indian who patrols the forest: "Illegal logging can be hard to tackle. Logging happens deep in the forest, far from the eyes of the world but GPS tracking technology and satellite surveillance means we can find out where loggers are and what kind of timber they want. We are tracking 560 hectares of virgin forest with new technologies, hopefully we will stop illegal logging here."

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Children of the guaranà 12
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
27 Mar 2013

Kennedy, 24, defends his land from illegal timber extraction. He is part of an international project with local partners. This project in the Satere-MawŽ area was created to support the local communities and to prevent illegal timber extraction by increasing daily surveillance, mapping forest resources and through a series of initiatives to raise awareness and environmental education. Indigenous and other local forest communities have seen their land seized, their lifestyles destroyed, and their livelihoods stolen. The US is the largest market for timber exported from Brazil. While Americans buy massive quantities of wood, often taken illegally from forests, to construct floors, outdoor paths, and piers, local people and activists working to protect the Amazon are being assassinated and kept quiet through intimidation.

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Children of the guaranà 03
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
26 Mar 2013

The Andir‡ river by night. The SaterŽ-MawŽ live in the region of the mid Amazon River, on the border between Brazil's two biggest states Amazonas and Par‡.

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Children of the guaranà 05
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
26 Mar 2013

It's a long trip to reach the SaterŽ-MawŽ reserve: one hour flight from Manaus to Parintins, the closest city, then an 8 hour trip by riverboat.

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Children of the guaranà 18
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
24 Mar 2013

Every year since 1995, residents of Guaranatuba village and some communities and volunteers from NGOs gather to celebrate the harvest of guaran‡ fruit, known worldwide for its high energy value. During two days of celebration, locals enjoy small performances by folks artists and musical performances to mark the event.

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Children of the guaranà 20
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
24 Mar 2013

A MawŽ girl listens intently to a speech about indigenous rights and the fair trade economy.

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Children of the guaranà 16
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
24 Mar 2013

A MawŽ woman prepares food and a guaran‡ drink at home. Guaran‡ is the daily, ritual and religious beverage, and it is drunk in large quantities by adults and children alike.

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Children of the guaranà 15
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

The areas where the SaterŽ-MawŽ live are called "s’tio". In this space each family unit has its residence, where a fire is lit both for cooking and for keeping the residents warm (the fire also serves to congregate the family members around it).

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Children of the guaranà 17
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

Guaranatuba village, located alongside of the Andira riverbank. Two young SaterŽ-MawŽ are preparing a powerful sound system for a guaran‡ harvest festival that hosts music, traditional dance and speeches about indigenous culture and politics.

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Children of the guaranà 22
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

A current project underway in the SaterŽ-MawŽ region involves the mapping of forest resources, the construction of a small nursery to produce 5,000 seedlings per year, making plans for the correct use of natural resources, training in techniques of forestry, collection of seeds and production of seedlings, Copaiba oil and Guarana powder.

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Children of the guaranà 07
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

The SaterŽ-MawŽ's name references two animals native in the region. The first word, SaterŽ, means Òburning caterpillarÓ, a reference to their societyÕs most important clan, the one that traditionally appoints the succeeding political rulers. The second word, MawŽ, means Òintelligent and curious parrot.Ó Here, a MawŽ group from various Andir‡ villages is learning something new about the guaran‡ process.

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Children of the guaranà 13
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that about 25% of global disease could be prevented by better management of the environment, and identifies deforestation as having a serious impact on human health.

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Children of the guaranà 21
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

Idecidis Da Costa, 60, is the village Tuxaua (village chief). Every village has a Tuxaua, who has the power of solving internal quarrels, summon meetings, scheduling celebrations and rituals. He also plans the agricultural activities and commercial transactions, and orders the building of houses.

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Children of the guaranà 24
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

A man washes his clothes in Guaranatuba. The SaterŽ-MawŽ language is part of the Tupi linguistic branch. But the MawŽ vocabulary contains elements that are entirely different from Tupi, and cannot be related to any other linguistic family. Today most SaterŽ-MawŽ are bilingual. They speak their own language and Portuguese.

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Children of the guaranà 25
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

Paulo is working at Posada Vinte Quilos, a small village for sustainable tourism in Guaranatuba. The project contributes to the improvement of socioeconomic, environmental, and cultural protection of traditional Middle Amazon societies through an inclusive model that integrates institution buildings, the preservation of environmental resources, and activities promoting eco-friendly and sustainable tourism.

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Children of the guaranà 09
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

In their "Sitios" families build their kitchen halfway between the house and the river, where the men roast guaran‡ and the women prepare meals from manioc root. They also have their dock where the family members bathe, wash clothes, soak cassava, wash guaran‡ and land their canoes.

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Children of the guaranà 10
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

MawŽ kids drink guaran‡ in a poor village near Guaranatuba. Much of the guaran‡-based Fair Trade economy aims at battling malnutrition and its consequences for the physical and mental condition of a whole generation of children and adolescents.

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Children of the guaranà 11
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

The SaterŽ-MawŽ of the Lower Amazon are one of the larger indigenous populations in Brazil and one of the few indigenous groups left in the immediate vicinity of the main Amazon River. Due to prolonged contact with the broader Brazilian society, the SaterŽ-MawŽ have been exposed to a variety of historical changes. As a consequence of a staggering demographic growth, the immediate surroundings of their villages have been largely depleted of game and fish, causing chronic food shortages.

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Children of the guaranà 23
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
21 Mar 2013

A man in Pira’ village is fixing his sanitation system. Pira’ is the first MawŽ community one encounters when traveling by boat from Parintins, the closest city.

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Children of the guaranà 06
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
20 Mar 2013

Since 1995 a great deal of hope rests on a fair trade project, which commercializes SaterŽ-MawŽ products such as guaran‡ and several other forest products. Although well established as an indigenous enterprise on an international market, the guaran‡ project still struggles to counter poverty in the villages on a large scale.

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Children of the guaranà 14
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
20 Mar 2013

A MawŽ moves from village to village using a traditional canoe. Guaran‡ is a plant native to the highlands of the MauŽs-Au River basin, which coincides precisely with the SaterŽ-MawŽ's traditional territory. The SaterŽ-MawŽ have transformed the "Paullinia cupana", a wild vine of the Sapindacea family, into a cultivated shrub, and mastered its planting and processing.