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Immigrant Single Mothers, Invisible R...
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
06 Jun 2013

Muna (random name), 39, lost the favour of her family after marrying a man from another tribal clan in Somalia. When her husband disappeared in 2010 both her family and her husband´s family tried to kill her. She fled in July 2011 and travelled to Bangkok but she had to leave her four children in her country. As a refugee, she started the process to be resettled.

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Immigrant Single Mothers, Invisible R...
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
06 Jun 2013

Andrea (random name) was married with a member of the Intelligence Service of the Tamil guerrilla during the civil war in Sri Lanka. When the civil war finished in 2009 her family was targeted by the government and they fled after her husband disappeared. She lives in Bangkok with two of her three children. She has been rejected as refugee and she is preparing the appeal against the UNHCR decision.

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Immigrant Single Mothers, Invisible R...
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
06 Jun 2013

Sahar (random name), 50, fled Iran in 2010 with her three children escaping from the abuses of her husband. Two of her three children are already adults but she also takes care of her granddaughter, abandoned by her Thai mother. She has recently been recognized as refugee by UNHCR.

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Immigrant Single Mothers, Invisible R...
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
06 Jun 2013

Sania (random name), 33, left Pakistan in 2012, one year after the escape of her husband, a member of an opposition organization. She lives with her three children in Bangkok, while her husband is hold in an Immigration Detention Center located in the same city. Both have been recognized as refugees.da, where she will be resettled.

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Immigrant Single Mothers, Invisible R...
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
05 Jun 2013

Rachel (random name) fled Sri Lanka in 2009 after being arrested by the authorities of her country for belonging to the Tamil community. She arrived first in Malaysia and traveled after to Bangkok, where she is waiting to get the refugee status. She has a 9 months old daughter who was born in Thailand.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (21 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
28 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga drink water as she arrive at her home from the Dandora dump site 28 May 2013 near the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (20 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
28 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga clean herself as she arrive at her home from the Dandora dump site on 28 May 2013 near the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (30 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
10 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga prepares to take her granddaughter Wairimu Njeri (7) to school, 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (4 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
10 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga prepares to take her granddaughter Wairimu Njeri (7) to school, 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (2 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
10 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga washes herself after preparing breakfast for her grandson Wahome Njeri (19) and her grand daughter on 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

This woman holds the jacket of her dead son while he was fighting against the regime with the FSA. Her four sons, all fighters, died fighting the regime.

Cette femme tient le blouson de son fils mort au combat aux cotés de l’armée syrienne libre. Ses quatre fils, tous combattants contre le régime sont décédés.

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Living in the Ruins of Gaddafi's Comp...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
10 Apr 2013

A child rides his bike in Gadaffi's compound

Abdullah's Mother

'My family is not in a good situation. I'm holding onto God, but you can't expect anything from the government right now. We're not proud of living here, but at least someone is putting this land to use.'

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KENYA DAILY LIFE (23 of 27)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
28 Feb 2013

A family prepares dinner in the Kibera slum.
Picture/Karel Prinsloo

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KENYA DAILY LIFE (8 of 27)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
28 Feb 2013

A woman and her child line up for water in Kibera.
Water is scarce, running water doesn't really exist and it is collected from the Nairobi dam. It is contaminated, and as a result it causes typhoid and cholera.
Picture/Karel Prinsloo

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Health in Uganda (16 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a young mother, affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital, waiting for having anti-retroviral medicine.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 24
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
21 Jan 2013

A child is dressed by her mother after being assisted by a doctor at the health center in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru. Most of the children in La Rinconada suffer malnutrition and problems of growth due to cold weather and pollution.

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Cooking
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
17 Dec 2012

A displaced woman from Timbuktu cooks food in the room of her host family in Bamako to later sell at the market. Many displaced find it hard to make ends meet as they are not able to resume their normal activities and livelihoods they had in the north.

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Crawling
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
16 Dec 2012

Aisha (name changed), 24, from Timbuktu sits in the room of her host family in Bamako where she has found refuge since being raped by members of the MNLA. Her nephew, Oumar (name changed and at right), 6, came with Aisha after his father was killed also by members of the MNLA. They threw white powder on his hands and body, leaving him blistered and sore. Soon after, his mother fled to Abidjan to search for work.

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Vegetables
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
15 Dec 2012

Many displaced women sell vegetables in order to feed their families in Bamako. More than 265,000 displaced travelled to refugee camps in Mauritania, Niger and Burkina Faso while 185,800 more have been internally displaced.

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Bedouin Settlement Near Israeli Housi...
Ma’aleh Adummim, West Bank
By javiervidela
06 Dec 2012

Mother with her daughter in front of fireplace at home in front of the settlement of Ma'aleh Adumim. Women tend to marry very young, it is quite normal even marry before age 18.

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We Have The Right To Know
Adlieh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

30 years have gone by and she still has hope of finding her, dead or alive. She demands her right to know what happened.

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Day of the Dead vigil for slain teenager
Nogales, Sonora
By ST McNeil
02 Nov 2012

Araceli Rodriguez leads a protest march on Day of the Dead along the US/Mexico border demanding justice for the brutal murder of her son by American security personnel (Nov. 2, 2012, Nogales, Sonora).

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Protesters demand accountability for ...
Nogales, Sonora
By ST McNeil
02 Nov 2012

Protesters marched to the port of entry to demand justice for the slaying of a 16-year-old by US Border Patrol (Nov. 2, 2012, Nogales, Sonora).

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In the land of God: Young Huaorani Mo...
Pastaza Ecuador
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Oct 2012

Cononaco Bameno-Ecuador(South America) October 27th-2012-EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY.
The Huaorani, also known as the Waos, are native Amerindians from the Amazonian Region of Ecuador (Napo, Orellana and Pastaza Provinces) who have marked differences from other ethnic groups from Ecuador. They comprise almost 4,000 inhabitants and speak the Huaorani language, a linguistic isolate that is not known to be related to any other language. Their ancestral lands are located between the Curaray and Napo rivers, about 50 miles (80 km) south of El Coca. These homelands – approximately 120 miles (190 km) wide and 75 to 100 miles (120 to 160 km) from north to south – are threatened by oil exploration. In 1993, the Huaorani, and Quichua indigenous people, filed a lawsuit against Texaco oil company for the environmental damages caused by oil extraction activities in the Lago Agrio oil field. After handing control of the oil fields to an Ecuadorian oil company, Texaco did not properly dispose of its hazardous waste, causing great damages to the ecosystem and crippling communities. And recently, an US oil giant, has been fined $8.6 billion, for causing devastating pollution in large parts of the Ecuadorian Amazon basin, where Huaorani tribe lives. The oil firm Texaco, wich merged with Chevron in 2001, had been accused of dumping billions of gallons of toxic waste into unlined pits in the Amazon’s rainforest and rivers. Tribes indigenous to the area, like the Huaorani, have campaigned for almost two decades against the firm’s actions, saying that the poisonous waste has increased cancer rates, killed wildlife and contaminated water.In the past, Huaorani were able to protect their culture and lands from both indigenous enemies and settlers but the fighting against the multinational oil company, still goes on.
In the last 40 years, they have shifted from a hunting and gathering society to live mostly in permanent forest settlements. In traditional animist Huaorani worldview, there is no distinction between the physical and spiritual worlds, and spirits are present throughout the world. The Huaorani once believed that the entire world was a forest (and used the same word, ömë, for both). The Oriente’s rainforest of Ecuador, remains the essential basis of their physical and cultural survival. For them, the forest is home, while the outside world is considered unsafe: living in the forest offered protection from the witchcraft and attacks of neighboring peoples.
The Huaorani believe the animals of their forest have a spiritual as well as physical existence. They believe that a person who dies walks a trail to the afterlife which has a large anaconda snake lying in wait. Those among the dead who cannot escape the snake fail to enter the domain of dead spirits and return to Earth to become animals, often termites. This underlies a mix of practices that recognize and respect animals, but does not shield them from harm for human use.
Hunting supplies a major part of the Huaorani diet and is of cultural significance. Traditionally, the creatures hunted were limited to monkeys, birds, and wild peccaries. Neither land-based predators nor birds of prey are hunted. Traditionally there was an extensive collection of hunting and eating taboos. They refused to eat deer, on the grounds that deer eyes look similar to human eyes. While a joyful activity, hunting (even permitted animals) has ethical ramifications: “The Huaorani must kill animals to live, but they believed dead animal spirits live on and must be placated or else do harm in angry retribution.” To counterbalance the offense of hunting, a shaman demonstrated respect through the ritual preparation of the poison, curare, used in blow darts. Hunting with such darts is not considered killing, but retrieving, essentially a kind of harvesting from the trees. Spearing wild peccaries, on the other hand, is killing and is practiced with violence and rage.
While never hunted, two other animals, the snake and the jaguar, have special significance for the Huaorani. Snakes are considered "the most evil force in the Huaorani cosmology", particularly the imposing (though nonvenemous) anaconda, or obe. A giant obe stands in the way of the forest trail that the dead follow to an afterlife with the creator in the sky. Here on earth, snakes are a bad omen, and traditionally killing them is considered taboo.
The Huaorani identify deeply with the jaguar, an important and majestic predator in the Oriente province of Ecuador. According to myth, the Huaorani were the descendants of a mating between a jaguar and an eagle. Elders became shamans by metaphorically adopting “jaguar sons” whose spirits communicate medical and spiritual knowledge. In the Huaorani belief system, jaguar shamans are able “to become a jaguar, and so to travel great distances telepathically and communicate with other Huaorani.”
Plants, especially trees, continue to hold a complex and important interest for the Huaorani. Their store of botanical knowledge is extensive, ranging from knowledge of materials to poisons to hallucinogens to medicines. They also relate plants to their own experiences, particularly that of growing. Among trees, certain kinds are auspicious. Canopy trees, with their distinctly colored young leaves and striking transformation as they mature to towering giants, are “admired for their solitary character … as well as for their profuse entanglement” with other plants. Other significant trees are the pioneer species of the peach palm (used for making spears and blowguns, as well as for fruit), and fast-growing balsa wood, used for ceremonial purposes. Peach palm trees are associated with past settlements and the ancestors who live there.
The Huaorani notion of time is particularly oriented to the present, with few obligations extending backwards or forwards in time. Their one word for future times, baane, also means "tomorrow". Spears are the main weapons of the Huaorani culture used in person to person conflict.
Their main hunting weapon is the blowgun. These weapons are typically from 3 to 4 metres long. The arrows used are dipped in curare poison, which paralyzes the muscles of the animal which is hit with it, so that it cannot breathe. Kapok fluff is used to create an air-tight seal, by twisting the fibers around the end of the dart or arrow. The pictures shows some huaorani navigating the cononaco Bameno river on the pirogue, going to Puerto Coca.

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Women in Syria, Kilis Camp
Azaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
02 Oct 2012

Organizers cross the border into "Free Syria" in order to deliver aid to those Syrians stuck outside of Turkey. This family of women describe the murder of their son and the destruction of their home.

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BLOODSHED IN SYRIA MUST END ; SYRIAN ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Editor's Picks
26 Sep 2012

On Wednesday, September 26, 2012, for the first time in decades that a sitting Egyptian head of state spoke at a UN General Assembly meeting, President Morsi stressed that the bloodshed in Syria must stop, that foreign intervention is not the right solution and he would not rest until the war is ended. He also spoke in support of the Palestinian right to establish an independent state.

There are nearly 73,000 Syrian refugees registered or waiting to be registered by UNHCR in Lebanon, of which 18,000 are on a waiting list and 51% of those are children. Through Save the Children and other programs, funds are being raised to support the thousands of refugee children seeking an education.

Public school teachers in Barcelona protested increasing austerity measures in Spain on Wednesday, September 26, 2012.

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A woman and her son walk towards the ...
Azaz, Syria,
By Ms_R
14 Sep 2012

It's estimated that around 10,000 (some estimates touch as high as 17,000) refugees are currently trapped on the Syrian border, waiting to get into Turkey. Many refugees have been waiting there for up to three weeks, in squalid conditions.

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Libya's Rebirth 3
Tripoli, Libya
By Monique Jaques
08 Jul 2012

Mabroka Rajah with her newly born baby in Tripoli Medical Center. Children born after the civil war will never know what Libya was like under Gaddafi.

42 years after the reign of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi and a violent civil war, Libya is waking up to a new and free country. With civil services and the country's infrastructure in ruins, Libyans struggle with the transition period from dictatorship to democracy. On July 7, 2012, Libyans voted in their first parliamentary elections since the end of Gaddafi's rule.

Mabroka Rajah et son nouveau né dans au Centre Médical de Tripoli. Comme celui de Mabroka, les enfants nés après la guerre civile ne connaitrons jamais ce qu'était la vie sous le régime de Kadhafi.

Après 42 ans d'un régime dictatorial et une violente guerre civile qui a laissé les infrastructures du pays en ruines, la Libye apprivoise peu a peu sa nouvelle liberté et les défis de la transition vers la démocratie. Le 7 juillet dernier, les Libyens étaient appelés aux urnes pour la première fois depuis la fin de l'ère Kadhafi afin d'élire les 200 membres du futur Congrès national général, qui sera chargé de rédiger une Constitution pour le pays.

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Sample media
Uganda_HIV
Gayaza
By Tadej Znidarcic
20 May 2012

Jacquelyne Mugenyi, HIV positive mother, plays with her son Mutumba Alpha in the backyard of their home in Gayaza, Uganda.

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Mourning Mother
Sarmeen, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Sarmeen, Syria

A women weeping for her three sons killed by government forces in a raid on Sarmeen.

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Mourning Mother
Sarmeen, Idlib, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Sarmeen, Syria

A women weeping for her three sons killed by government forces in a raid on Sarmeen.

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Mourning Her Three Sons
Sarmeen, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Sarmeen, Syria

A women mourns her three sons killed by government forces in a raid on Sarmeen.

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Mourning Death of Sons
Taftanaz, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Taftanaz, Syria
Mourning the death of their two sons who were members of the FSA and killed by government forces.

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Mourning Death of Sons
Taftanaz, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Taftanaz, Syria
Mourning the death of their two sons who were members of the FSA and killed by government forces.

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Bus station
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
11 Apr 2012

A family from northern Mali arrives in the Bamako bus station with all their possessions after a long journey from rebel-occupied Gao. More than 265,000 travelled to refugee camps in Mauritania, Niger and Burkina Faso while 185,800 more have been internally displaced.

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Mother And Child In Camp (17-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Standing in Silence
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
10 Jan 2012

Cairo, January 10, 2012
Mubarak's trial, outside the court.
A mother shows photos of her martyred son,
Arafa Ahmed Mohamed.

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Mother Calls for Justice
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
10 Jan 2012

January 10, 2012 - Cairo

Hassan Muhamed Ahmed's mother calls for justice outside of Mubarak's trial. 20-year-old Hassan Muhamed Ahmed was killed during the revolution in Alexandria. His mom says he took care of her and his sick brother .

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Protesters At The Trial, Chanting: Re...
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
10 Jan 2012

Cairo, January 10, 2012

Outside Mubarak's trial, protesters chant alongside a mother whose son was shot and killed in Alexandria on January 25, 2011. They chant for retribution, saying,

"I hear the martyr's mother say: Tantawi, who is responsible," "I hear the martyr's mother say: the Interior [Minister] killed my son, the army killed my son."

"I swear on your blood..new revolution again. Martyr rest in peace and wait for us at the paradise's gate,
Martyr rest in peace we'll continue struggle."

"Just go tell the Killers: Revenge between us and you for ever. Blood for blood, bullet for bullet, we ask for retribution."
"Retribution, retribution, they killed our brothers by bullet, they gave martyrs as a gift to the sniper."