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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 06
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

In moments of telage, great part of the equipment is disassembled and ready for departure, the artists eat fast food all together before going back to work.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 07
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Toma, french guy, is on road with Bidon’s Circus for a year. He mainly deals with parks horses and keeps responsibility throughout torunee. He has a wild personality and brings much cheerfulness in to the company.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 08
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

During the summer tornee rarely reprove parts of the show, called "returns". During some afternoon hours Francois follows the company giving advice about improving some numbers.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 09
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The Barrique is a carriage built by Francois for his son and is currently occupied by Freddo, musician of the company. When he has some free time he’s playing or practicing juggling with clubs, another of his passion.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 10
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The oldest carriage circus called La Vielle and is currently occupied by Laura and Pippo, couple both on stage and in personal life. Carriages are small and contain everything needed to an itinerant life; from clothes for the show to life memories.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 11
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

During the breaks Laura exercising with Fisarmonica, her great passion. She would like in the future to integrate it into one of her numbers. During the winter period she’s always looking for new job opportunities.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 12
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Pippo is a juggler and musician and he’s for more years at work with the circus Bidone. He’s always available when there is work. Pippo is very caring and responabile to the whole structure of the circus.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 13
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Coco is the clown of the company. Lives in the carriage Clarabelle, the only one built by a midget and not by Francois. Very young he’s the first year of employment with the circus. He’s quiet and peaceful person during daily life but becomes an excellent clown during the show.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 14
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Once the circus is located inside the municipal areas the show are programmed each day. The duration of a show is two hours. Artists must follow strictly the lineup and can not change the numbers.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 15
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Davelle is a Spanish guy on the first year of employment with the circus Bidone. He is represented as a juggler and as a clown. He knows how to mix the two techniques making fun and magical numbers.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 16
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Spaces used for backstage change depending on different locations. Sometimes the company can rely on wide spaces and sometimes they must be adapted. The carriages are used like a fifth stage.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 18
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Laura gets ready for the scene of Marionette while Toma waiting to prepare the horses. Carriage are very important in the show being the only ones available for costume changes.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 19
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Marcelo is the handyman of the company, one who helps and manages the technical parts. Here, through an umbrella, help Laura to switch between carriage without being seen by the audience.He’s alongside circus from 7 years.

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The Almighty Goat
Karaman, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

Unlike sheep who follow their leader to the next grazing destination, goats choose the destination. Goats are selective eaters, so their owners must abide by their rules when finding a summer home.
As a result, goat milk and cheese is more lucrative than sheep products.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Modern Living in Ancient Buildings
Uçkuyu, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

Some families have made a home at the ancient site of 1001 Churches, where archaeologists found 1000 churches, but failed to find the 1001st.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Modern Living in Ancient Buildings
Uçkuyu, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

Some families have made a home at the ancient site of 1001 Churches, where archaeologists found 1000 churches, but failed to find the 1001st.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Kuzu "Sheep"
Karaman, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Kuzu "Sheep"
Karaman, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

Some shepherds wield sheep for the wool, meat and milk. And they're much easier to transport to the summer destinations. Goats prove to be more work as they are selective in their summer homes due to their choice in grazing.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Yörük village
Karaman, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

This village is in Kılbasan, an area of Karaman. The buildings are protected by the government so that no more construction can take place.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Yörük sheperd, Eyüp
Karaman, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

This village is in Kılbasan, an area of Karaman. The buildings are protected by the government so that no more construction can take place.

Eyüp said he had horses, but wasn't able to build a barn or pen to contain them. He said they have become property of the mountain.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Yörük sheperd, Bayram Bulut
Karaman, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

Bayram has 4 children, 3 that are educated and live in other cities, and a son who has remained to work with his father. He says you can become educated or you can look a goat in the ass. These are the options for modern day nomads.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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The Almighty Goat
Karaman, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

Unlike sheep who follow their leader to the next grazing destination, goats choose the destination. Goats are selective eaters, so their owners must abide by their rules when finding a summer home.
As a result, goat milk and cheese is more lucrative than sheep products.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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The Turkish Tractor
Karaman, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Modern Living in Ancient Buildings
Uçkuyu, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

Some families have made a home at the ancient site of 1001 Churches, where archaeologists found 1000 churches, but failed to find the 1001st.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Fatih Yayla
Davraz, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Fatih, whose grandfather is a famous shepherd in Isparta, doesn't relate to the Yörük lifestyle and culture. Although, he works as a snowboard instructor on Davraz Mountain in the winter and enjoys life on the seaside of Antalya in the summers.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Yörük carpet
Davraz, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

The Yörük tradition stays alive through handwoven carpets and clothing made from wool, as seen here in a blanket.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Young Girl with Sheep
Çobanisa, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

A young girl, following her father and stray sheep, fixes her hair while keeping in line.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Shopping Sheep
Çobanisa, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Tradition mixes with modern life on this street corner in Çobanisa. The local market opens shop, but is challenged by sheep on their way home and the Audi that blocks their trail.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Kuzu "Sheep"
Davraz, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Sheep are on their way back home after a day grazing on the mountainside.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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3 Generations, Hasan Ali, Mehmet and ...
Davraz, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Hasan Ali, 92 years old, insists the way of life for the Yörük is finished.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Turkish Nomads
Turkey
By Mais Istanbuli
16 Feb 2013

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. With modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of them have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the coast.

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The Kidnapped Brides of Kyrgyzstan
Bishkek
By Daniel Burgui Iguzkiza
31 Jan 2011

Text and photos by Daniel Burgui Iguzkiza

FULL ARTICLE IN ENGLISH UPON REQUEST
(ARTICLE COMPLET EN FRANCAIS SI-JOINT) (ARTICULO COMPLETO EN ESPAÑOL ANEXADO)

Although there are no reliable statistics, it is estimated that one in three women in Kyrgyzstan are kidnapped and married against their will. Young women are often forced to marry the men who abduct them, in many cases complete strangers, and sometimes violently.

When Bermet left her home in the morning, nothing made her suspect that by the end of that day; she would be a married woman. Bermet, 19, was abducted by a stranger in Bishkek as she was coming back from her college philology class. She was violently forced into her captor's car, where she spent more than three hours fighting her abduction on the way to a house in Cholpon-Ata, in a remote village hundreds of kilometres far from her place at Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan's capital city. Exhausted by her efforts, she decided to quit. “I decided stop fighting because I was exhausted and I was nearly to faint”, she narrates now, at her mother-in-law's house. She was isolated in a room and after passing a night there she was forced to get married. She eventually got pregnant by her kidnapper. Today, her husband.

Elmira Elimsolova, a woman nearing fifty-years-old, and her daughter were both married against their will.

"I was kidnapped when I was young and I have had seven children and a good husband,” she said. “Two of my four daughters have been kidnapped too. I cried a lot, I did not want that for them, but now they are happy."

Although bride kidnapping is against Kyrgyz law and officially prosecuted, few kidnappers have been condemned. In fact, during the last 20 years there have been only two resolutions.

The most recent sentence it was, a year ago, by the end of October 2013. A 30 year-old man who had raped twice a 17-years old teen. It took place on the region of Bakai-Ata. He attempted to kidnap her in three failed occasions.

The first time he tried to abduct her was on August 27, 2012; but her parents went on time to rescue and release her. The same evening, just few hours after the first attempt, he, unsuccessfully, tried to kidnap her again. During the following weeks, he threatened her via sms texting in order to make her keep silent about the sexual aggression. Because of shame, She never told to her parents. But on September 9th 2012, he abducted the young girl again. This time, the kidnaper was able to retain his potential bride a couple of days in a cottage thanks to the collaboration of the family of the supposed groom. He raped her again. This is a usual way to sustain the forced marriage, arguing that it has been consummated, obviously by force. But, the insistence of the parents of the girl and their efforts for her release were filled at the midnight of Sept 11th 2012 when a local Police squad entered at the captor’s house, arrested him and freed the girl.

During the trial of this case, the judge –a lady, not a man– asked to the accused: “Would you be disposed to apologize to the victim and marry her?”. Or even worst, during the trial, the victim was asked to not continue the process: “They are offering to you a wealthy family, a good mother in law, a handsome husband, why are you doing that? Why do you need to continue with this process?”

Munara Beknazarova, a women rights activist and head of Open Line Foundation, who has been following this case and its long and bizarre process at the Court says that this is a clear example of how socially accepted is this practice on the Kyrgyz people. Finally the perpetrator of the kidnap and aggression was sentenced to five years of imprisonment. But he only was charged of kidnapping. The medical examiners were never able to probe the sexual aggression.

While the practice remains prevalent in many regions of Kyrgyzstan, everyday citizens, activists and professionals are now speaking out against the practice of kidnapping women for marriage.

Kuban Kurmanbekovich, 32, is a nomadic shepherd from Talastan, near the Kochkor region. Although they now live in a remote area, he met his wife Elnura Amasilieva, 32, at college. They have three children: Arsen, Adelina and Esen. During the USSR era, Kuban studied Agricultural Engineering, while Elnura studied Economics. They met in a disco, fell in love and married.

"I do not want anyone to kidnap my daughter. Kidnapping is not a Kyrgyz tradition. It's just a pretext made by evil people", he says.

Dr. Turganbubu Orunbaeva, a medical doctor and feminist activist, has spent the last twenty years on the vanguard of eradicating the bride kidnapping tradition in her region. She conducts training sessions and conferences for teens, the Islamic authorities, police and abducted women. She also offers her support to women who have been victims of any kind of vulnerable situation or gender violence through her association called 'Bakubat,' which means 'comfort' in the Kyrgyz language.

Professor Kleinbach, an emeritus doctor from the University of Philadelphia, has been investigating bride kidnapping for the last twenty years. He says that even some of his students at the university fear being kidnapped. Some of the young ladies wear false wedding rings as a safeguard against abduction, arguing that they are already married.

However, some creative couples have used the practice to their advantage. One young man even kidnapped his bride at her behest.

After several years dating Mariam, Solo was still not able to save enough money for their wedding. The dowry set by Mariam’s father was simply too expensive for him to afford. A few weeks before their marriage, Solo kidnapped Mariam at her request in order to avoid paying the dowry. “We were in love,” the two said. “This was the only way for us to overcome Mariam’s father’s price on his daughter’s hand in marriage.”