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Druze Reincarnation-12
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
31 Jan 2018

Traditional Mashrabiya window coverings at the Druze Council in Beirut, home to its clerical authority. Many agree, that the firm belief in reincarnation - which also changed the opinions of sceptics such as Nibal himself - allowed them to fight without the fear of death, and gave closure to families after sudden loss of close ones.

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Druze Reincarnation-15
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
25 Jan 2018

An elderly Druze man sells newspapers in Aley, Mount Lebanon. According to Gerald Russell, who wrote about the Druze, “Going into battle, the Druze would shout: ‘Who wants to sleep in the mother's womb tonight?’”

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Druze Reincarnation-14
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
25 Jan 2018

Bridge on Beirut-Damascus highway. After a death of a Druze, the saying in the community goes - “May the person be reborn to good parents.”

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Druze Reincarnation-8
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
25 Jan 2018

Bridge on Beirut-Damascus railway, shrouded in the passing clouds. Those children who remember violent deaths in previous lives, usually involve sudden accidents, car crashes and most recently, the war.

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Druze Reincarnation-5
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
25 Jan 2018

Bridge connecting Mount Lebanon with the road to Beeka Valley, yet also forming the north-south dividing line between Druze and Christian strongholds, who fought a brief, but bitter civil war in 1860, and again in the late 20th century. Regardless, both areas retain a mix of religions today.

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Druze Reincarnation-4
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
25 Jan 2018

Clouds over Chouf region, on Mount Lebanon, drifting over cedar trees, the symbol of Lebanon. Chouf was the home to Fakhr-Al-Din, the Druze leader in the early 17th century, who managed to carve out a kingdom in the Ottoman empire stretching as far as Palmyra in present-day Syria.

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Druze Reincarnation-11
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
04 Nov 2017

The Druze have continued tracing their multiple lives across Mount Lebanon, which helped the community become fearful fighters against their enemies. “In this life, I am a supporter of the same political party, same as my parents. Throughout my youth, I wanted to fight for the same ideals, and used to think about the joining the war in neighbouring Syria, but with age, this fighting spirit has decreased,” said Nibal.

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Druze Reincarnation-13
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
04 Nov 2017

Valleys in Mount Lebanon carry an air of beauty and mystique, akin to philosophical studies of the Druze faith, centered on monotheism and individual interpretation. Shadi Khalek, Nibal’s friend, recalls asking his Christian teacher at school: “If we were all sons of God, same as Jesus; I do not remember the answer.”

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Druze Reincarnation-7
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
04 Nov 2017

Nibal Khalek stands in the backdrop of the Druze religious house in his village, Majdal Baana. Nibal accepted the influence of the past life in his current decisions, which in a way, guided his choices in the present life. “Maybe that's why my soul wanted to be reborn in this body, to finish what it started,” he said.

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Druze Reincarnation-6
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
15 Oct 2017

Faint outline of the Druze religious building hugs the outline of the rock face on Mount Lebanon. The religious buildings, the Khalwa, are nondescript, often displaying no more than the five-point star of the Druze faith.

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Druze Reincarnation-10
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
15 Oct 2017

A home in Majdal Baana village. As entire generations live side-by-side, noticing reincarnations in the early years following a child’s birth became a family tradition.

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Druze Reincarnation-3
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
15 Oct 2017

Many children, including Nibal, guided their families to the houses of their previous-life families. Nibal remembered his death in clashes between the Syrian Social Nationalist Party, with whom the Druze allied during the civil war, and Islamists in the Sunni Muslim stronghold in Tripoli, northern Lebanon.

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Druze Reincarnation-1
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
14 Oct 2017

View towards Beirut from Mount Lebanon, the heart of Druze community in Lebanon. The now-defunct Damascus-Beirut railway operated until the civil war broke out in 1975, and opened these mountains to tourists from across the Levant escaping the summer heat. Prior to that, it made an ideal stronghold for its autonomous community, submerged in religious secrecy.

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Druze Reincarnation-2
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
14 Oct 2017

A Druze man plays the flute in their friends hangout, perched on the hill overlooking the valley below. The tight knit community of friends all subscribe to the ideals of Druze faith - or at least, to the little of it that they do know.

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Druze Reincarnation-9
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
14 Oct 2017

Young people from Nibal’s village dance Dabke - the traditional regional dance. All in their late 20s and 30s, no one has ever been shown the ways of Druze faith, without having undertaken the lifelong path of becoming a religious cleric, the sheikh.

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The way of the Druze
Chouf
By Levant Desk
06 Sep 2014

September 7, 2014
Chouf, Lebanon

The Druze are a small, but influential religious tribe spread across the Levant. Known for their bravery and secrecy, they made headlines recently as one of their own, Amal Alamuddin, married George Clooney.

Transterra Media travels deep into the mountains of Lebanon, to the Druze stronghold known as the "Chouf", where a local festival celebrating Druze traditions is underway.

(02:27) Woman 1: Everyone who has an orchard is working on producing jams and dried fruits so they can sell it. Here you can find cooked/dried figs, honey, homemade eggplant pickles, labneh, kaak and some bakeries.. All of these are made in our farms (03: 17)

(03:18) Contributor: Are all these products local? Or you get some products from other villages? (03:21)

(03:22) Woman 1: We have both. we really thank the municipality and the whole village for organizing such an event to promote our products. (03:36)

(03:37) Contributor: Is it true that the people who live in villages are more attached to their homelands than those who live in the cities? (03:42)

(03:42) Woman 1: At first, they weren't really attached, but now you see the young generations taking care of their lands more and more. (03:47)

(03:48) Contributor: Why do you think this is happening in your opinion? (03:49)

(03:49) Mainly because of the price rising in the market, and because of the disease outbreaks that are happening. When a person eats from his own products, he knows what were used to help grow these plants (04:17).

(04:18) Contributor: What is the best memory you have from your childhood in the village here? (04:25)

(04:26) Woman 1: I wish the good old days come back. We lived in peace, everybody was friendly, we used to eat healthy food, we lived like a united community; we all worked together and helped together in baking bread. I really wish these days come back (04:57).

(04:58) Contributor: How attached to traditions the people in the villages are? (05:00).

(05:02) Woman 1: Traditions are disappearing little by little, although some villages still wear the traditional outfit (Cherwal), and other villages are strongly attached to their traditions (05:20).

(05:21) Contributor: Where do you come from? (05:23).

(05:23) Woman 1: I come from Baakline, we still have some traditions in my village. We are all united hand by hand in the Chouf Region. (05:38).

(05:39) Contributor: Did you hear about the story of a young lady from Baakline is getting married to a famous actor? What do you think? (03:44).

(05:45) Woman 1: Yeah I heard about it, it’s really her personal matter, she is free to choose what she wants. But why not, we have no problem (05:58)

(05:59) Contributor: If your daughter told you she loved someone from another region, would you accept? (06:08)

(06:09) Woman 1: If she loves him and she’s happy with him, I can do nothing about it, she is old and wise to choose what she wants (06:20)

(07:10) Woman 2: These are all hand made by local old housewives. We believe that these crafts are disappearing slowly because of the existence of large factories now. This is really bad, since it’s the only income for the old housewives. We really hope they support these women in their production. Other than the women, let’s think of the handicapped girls who can't get out of their houses (07:55)

(07:56) This can be framed and hang on the wall. As for this white one, it is made for dining tables. As for this small one, it is used for trays and it comes in different designs. All of these you see here are handmade (08:47).

(09:54) Woman 3: (00:09) Woman 2: This is hand made; it’s made out of wool. It takes around 1 month to finish it and it is usually done by the women here. This is a dress for a baby; we still prefer to give a gift that is hand made. This is made out of wool for winter times and it takes around 20 days to finish it. You can find a big variety of items here. They still love to work in crafts in the villages. I made this tablecloth. These are hand made head covers, that are used to funerals mainly and they come in different designs. Most of the women work in these designs, including embroiders like this one (11:37).

(11:37) Contributor: Contributor: Do you think they are still attached to their traditions? (11:40).

(11:40) Woman 3: Of course, you always find people who don't know how valuable this work is, they demand a lot of work, around 1 month. Alhamdulillah on the other hand you still find people who are interested in them and order them, mostly in the villages (11:58).

(11:58) Contributor: Do you think they are still attached to traditional cloths? (12:02)

(12:02) Woman 3: You always find people who want to buy these work because it valuable, and it’s still widely used in the villages (12:26).

(12:27) Contributor: Do you think the people here are still attached to their lands more than before? (12:31)

(12:32) Woman 3: Yes of course, thanks to the exhibitions that are taking place and the organizers’ interest in showing the traditional designs (12:46).

(12:47) Contributor: What do they wear in traditional weddings? (12:52)

(12:53) Woman 3: During the weddings they usually wear whatever they want, but traditionally, the women wear a black dress with this hand made white headcover (13:04). (13:05) Contributor: I think you heard about a Durze girl who is getting married to a famous actor here, George Clooney if you know him (13:19)

(13:20) Woman 2: Oh really? Why not? Where is she? Tell her to come buy a headscarf from my collection (13:27).

(13:28) Contributor: Do you want to send her the headscarf as a wedding gift? (13:28)

(13:28) Woman 2: Why not, only if she buys her home mattress covers and tablecloths from me. This is also a tablecloth made of lacework that takes lots of time (13:54).

(14:19) Woman 3: I’m baking Mna’eech of all kinds; cheese, thyme, labneh, meat, whatever you want (14:30).

(14:31) Contributor: This is all from your garden right? (14:32)

(14:32) Woman 3: Yes of course, we grow the thyme; we mix the cheese and meat. And the dough is prepared using the wheat that we grow (14:46).

(14:46) Contributor: Do you think the people are still attached to their homeland? (14:47).

(14:48) Woman 3: Yes a lot. If it comes to me, I can never live except in the mountain (14:59).

(14:59) Contributor: Why not? (15:00).

(15:00) Woman 3: Because I lived all my life here and I'm used to the life in the mountain. The climate is different and everything else is (15:08).

(15:09) Contributor: What about the people in the mountain? (15:09).

(15:10): Woman 3: They are perfect (15:12).

(15:12) Contributor: Do you think those who live in the mountain are more attached to their lands than those who live in the city? And why? (15:18).

(15:20): Woman 3/Man: Yes of course. These are our habits. Those who have lived their whole lives in the mountains can’t get out easily, they are attached to it and they get used to live here (15:37).

(15:47) Cheikh: Our traditions are out identity. It’s who we are, we can’t change it. This is the way we live (16:05).

(16:22) Contributor: Can you tell us a memory you recall from your life here in the mountain? (16:26).

(16:27) Man/Cheikh: All our memories are here. We always try to inherit our traditions to our kids (16:48).

(17:05) Woman 3: This is the thyme we grow in our gardens, we pick it and let it dry in the sun before we grind it before mixing it with sumac (17:26).

(17:26) Contributor: So from A to Z this is homemade (17:27).

(17:27) Woman 3: Yes of course (17:28).

(17:38) Woman 3: These herbs are found in the garden. We don't grow them, they just appear next to the tomatoes we grew. We add to it tomatoes, onions, sumac and olive oil (17:54).

(22:19) Man 2: This is a traditional chicken sandwich from the mountain; we raise chicken in our farms without any chemical products and we slaughter them; this is Halal (22:25).

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Druze Sheikhs of Lebanon
Bekaa
By Walid
25 Jul 2014

Sheikh Walid Azzam : ( Kherbet Qanafar .West-Bekaa) A farmer for over 40 years, Sheikh Azzam owns and cultivates land in the legendary Bekaa valley.

Cheikh Walid Azzam : ( Kherbet Qanafar .Bekaa -Ouest) Agriculteur depuis plus de 40 ans, il possède et cultive des terrains dans la Bekaa.

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Mirrors: The Druze Sheikhs of Lebanon
Lebanon
By Walid
25 Jul 2014

2014
Lebanon

"Mirrors ..." is a dive into the contemporary life of Druze Sheikhs in Lebanon, a photographic testimony that attempts to capture the essence of an often misunderstood faith and people. For these Sheikhs, religion permeates all aspects of their life. Be they doctors, farmers, writers, or construction workers, their relationship with the world is full of compassion, integrity and a tender attitude to the environment. They all feed an insatiable thirst for knowledge regarding the living and themselves; a curiosity that is often and wrongly taken to a form of isolation from the world.

“Miroirs…” est une plongée dans la vie contemporaine des Cheikhs druzes, un témoignage photographique qui tente de capter l’essence d’une foi et d’un peuple souvent mal compris. Pour ces Cheikhs, la religion imprègne tous les aspects de la vie. Médecins, agriculteurs, écrivains, ouvriers du bâtiment : quel que soit leur métier, leur rapport au monde est empreint de compassion, d’intégrité et d’un regard tendre sur leur environnement. Tous, ils nourrissent une insatiable soif de connaissance vis-à-vis du vivant et vis-à-vis d’eux-mêmes. Une curiosité qui est souvent, et à tort, prise pour une forme d’isolement du monde.

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Residents and Religious Leaders Vote ...
Sweida
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

June 3, 2014
Sweida, Syria

Residents and religious leaders in the government controlled city of Sweida vote and celebrate at a polling station during the Syrian presidential election. Included are interviews with two election workers in two different polling stations, and with the Sheikh al-Akl, the spiritual leader of Druze sect in Syria.

Adnan Janoud, Head of the First Polling Station in Sweida province:
"At 6:30 in the early morning we started. We had the presence of the judiciary committee who opened the boxes and make sure there were no papers inside. They then sealed them again with the committee, the agents, and the journalists as witnesses. The vote then started after we set the right atmosphere for the voters to feel free to enter the secret room [voting booth]. Throughout the huge turn out, we were able to organize the voting process comfortably and smoothly. Large numbers of people showed up to vote and we had to remember that they came here during the difficult times Syria is suffering from. Voters came here, not only to vote for a president, but to vote for [their opinion on] the situation and for the resistance in this area, and [their will] to stand in the face of all the forces cooperating against Syria, be they foreign or Arab. We faced no obstacles during the voting process”.

Najat al-Shaar, Head of Second Polling Station in Sweida:
"We consider this a national celebration, a complete national celebration. We will definitely win with such a resilient people, resilient army, and resilient leader. I would like to thank these people for their excitement and love for their country and their love for the Syrian army”.

Interviewer: Are you facing any difficulties?

Najat al-Shaar:
“There are no difficulties, only the joy and excitement that you can see. There is no difficulty, we will win with help of God, thank you”.

Voter 1:
“Today is a democratic celebration, it is a celebration for Syrians. It is our victory and pride, our national duty, and it is about facing everyone. I came here to vote for the President, Dr. Bashar al-Assad, our candidate, and our pride and protector”.

Voter 2:
“Today represents the love between Syrians and we would like to salute our leader Dr. Bashar al-Assad. Today is a national celebration that indicates Syrians love for each other and their unity”.

Voter 3:
“Today is the day of victory, and it is the day of the presidential election. It is the day Syria enters the modern stage with the leadership of Bashar al-Assad. Today we will be together along with Bashar al-Assad--Bashar the protector, Bashar the victor--and along with the Syrian Arab army to conquer the invaders and kick out the terrorists”.

Interviewer: Your Eminence, what does this day mean to you?

Sheikh al-Akl, Spiritual Leader of the Druze Sect in Syria:
“It is a national celebration to prove to the world that Syria is able to manage itself and take care of its own business. Syrians are the ones to decide the fate of Syria and the process of voting for the President is evidence to our victory. This victory comes in time with the victory of the Syrian Arab Army on the ground. We proved to everyone that our choice is a peaceful solution and national dialogue. It is a message to be sent that the crisis in Syria cannot be solved without the approval of Syrians or with violence and destruction”.

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Syrians in Government-Held Sweida Dis...
Sweida, Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
02 Jun 2014

June, 2, 2014
Sweida, Syria

Syrians in the government-held city of Sweida discuss the Syrian presidential election. Video shows street shots of Sweida, including shots of posters of Bashar al-Assad, along with vox pops of local residents on the street.

Citizen 1:
“In times like these Syria is witnessing political pluralism, pluralism in the field of election. We had three candidates running in the election and each candidate got what he deserved from this whole election process. However, we can notice that people are totally convinced-of course I am speaking on behalf of my family, my province, and my whole nation-we all agree that nobody is able to handle such responsibility [of ruling Syria] other than President Bashar Hafez al-Assad”.

Citizen 2:
“We are all going tomorrow to vote for the honorable man who rules the country with integrity and cleaned it from the corruption. We choose, all of us, old and young, the President Dr. Bashar al-Assad to be a role model of honor and integrity. Any other president would have boarded a plane and left, but he stayed and did not give up on his country”.

Citizen 3:
“We are all, as Syrian citizens, going tomorrow, June 3rd, to practice our right to vote. All of us in Sweida province will be the first people to go to the polling stations and vote for the Doctor [Bashar al-Assad]. He is our Doctor and the Doctor of all Syrians. He is not only the leader of Syria, he is the leader of all Arab countries and he deserves to lead Syria because he lived this crisis for three years. With all due respect to everyone, we lived with him through the good times and the bad time and he was always there supporting us”.

Citizen 4:
“We salute our Syrian army and the wise leadership of President Bashar Hafez al-Assad to designate June 3rd as the date of the election. I am sure that Syrians will rush to the polling stations to vote for the right candidate, the one who will lead Syria to safety”.

Citizen 5:
“Tomorrow we are going to vote in order to prove the decision [of who rules the country] is in the hands of Syrians”.

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Druze Sheikhs of Lebanon
bzebdine
By Walid
14 May 2014

Sheikh Majed SERIEDDINE: (Bzebdine) :Farmer and Calligrapher. Passionate about poetry and literature, he also loves nature and is interested in social life and relations between people. He is responsible for religious events in his village and earns his living from nature as a farmer.

Cheikh Majed SERIEDDINE: (Bzebdine) Agriculteur et Calligraphe. Passionné par la poésie et la littérature, il aime également la nature, et s'intéresse a la vie sociale et aux relations entre les gens. Responsable des faits religieux dans son village, il gagne sa vie de la nature dans laquelle se reflète pour lui la Grâce Divine.

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“Miroirs… Les Cheikhs Druzes Mowahhed...
chouf
By Walid
07 May 2014

“Miroirs…” est une plongée dans la vie contemporaine des Cheikhs druzes, un témoignage photographique qui tente de capter l’essence d’une foi et d’un peuple souvent mal compris. Pour ces Cheikhs, la religion imprègne tous les aspects de la vie. Médecins, agriculteurs, écrivains, ouvriers du bâtiment : quel que soit leur métier, leur rapport au monde est empreint de compassion, d’intégrité et d’un regard tendre sur leur environnement. Tous, ils nourrissent une insatiable soif de connaissance vis-à-vis du vivant et vis-à-vis d’eux-mêmes. Une curiosité qui est souvent, et à tort, prise pour une forme d’isolement du monde.

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Druze Sheikhs of Lebanon
Kfarhim
By Walid
20 Mar 2014

Sheikh Nizam BOU KHZAM: (Kfarhim ) Founder and President of the "The Lebanese Environment House" association and co-founder of the Spiritual Board of Mount Lebanon, he has been a social worker for 32 years. In France, he founded the "Cedar and Olive" (Chalon) association. He is also Supervisor of Arab Ministers of the Environment in the Arab League (Egypt). He is passionate about hiking, tourism, traveling and reading.

Cheikh Nizam BOU KHZAM: (Kfarhim) Fondateur et Président de l'association « La Maison Libanaise de l’Environnement », et co-fondateur de le Commission Spirituelle du Mont Liban, il est travailleur social depuis 32 ans. En France, il a fondé l'association « Cèdre et Olive » (Chalon). Il est aussi Superviseur des Ministres Arabes de l’environnement au sein de la Ligue Arabe (Égypte). Passionné de randonnée, de voyages touristiques et de lecture.

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Druze Sheikhs of Lebanon
Batloun
By Walid
19 Mar 2014

Sheikh Karam KAMAL-EL-DINE: (Batloun): Painter for 22 years. He is holding a degree in psychology and a Masters in Fine Arts from the Lebanese University. He teaches in public schools and manages a private studio called "Art House". He is the designer of some of the biggest mosaic canvas of the world and his work is visible today in the courtyard of Cultural and Sporting Club of Batloun.

Cheikh Karam KAMAL-EL-DINE: (Batloun) Peintre depuis 22 ans. Titulaire d'une licence en psychologie et d'une maîtrise en arts plastiques à l'Université Libanaise. Il enseigne dans quelques écoles publiques et gère un atelier privé appelé « Maison d'art ». Concepteur du plus grand tableau en mosaïque du monde, il est passe de l'idée à l’action, son œuvre étant aujourd’hui visible dans la cour du Club Culturel et Sportif de Batloun.

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Druze Sheikhs of Lebanon
Hasbayya
By Walid
17 Mar 2014

A blacksmith specialized in the manufacture of water tanks and other products, he has been working in this field for 20 years. Employed by the Civil Defense, he is passionate about his job and is also a beekeeper.

Forgeron spécialisé dans la fabrication de réservoirs d’eau et d’autres produits. Il travaille dans ce domaine depuis 20 ans. Employé dans la Défense Civile, il est passionné par son métier de forgeron et exerce également l’apiculture.

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Druze Sheikhs of Lebanon
Bekkifa
By Walid
15 Mar 2014

Sheikh Ali KREIDI: (Bekkifa) A shepherd since his childhood, he grew up in the house of his grandfather. He spent 15 years of his life with his herd of goats in the meadows, on the fringes of villages and their inhabitants in Jabal Al Sheikh. Today, he has a herd of 400 goats and earns his living from the sale of milk and fertilizer.

Cheikh Ali KREIDI: (Bekkifa) Berger depuis son enfance, il a grandi dans la maison de son grand père. Il a passé 15 ans de sa vie avec son troupeau de chèvres dans les prairies en marge des villages et de ses habitants à Jabal Al Cheikh. Aujourd'hui, il possède un troupeau de 400 de chèvres et gagne sa vie de la vente de lait et d'engrais.

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Druze Sheikhs of Lebanon
Hasbayya
By Walid
15 Mar 2014

Sheikh Nadim BADAWI: (Hasbayya) Distributor and President of the Al Jabal Sport Club, of which he has been a member since his childhood. He loves sports, especially football, and encourages everyone to practice. The football stadium was inaugurated in 1985 and renovated last year by adding a mini football stadium.

Cheikh Nadim BADAWI: (Hasbayya) Commerçant et président du Club Sportif -Al Jabal dont il est membre depuis son enfance. Il aime le sport, le football en particulier, et encourage tout le monde à le pratiquer. Le stade de football a été inauguré en 1985 et rénové l'année dernière en y ajoutant un stade de mini-football.

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Druze Sheiks of Lebanon
Shwayya
By Walid
15 Mar 2014

Sheikh Farès DEIAYBES: ( West-Chouwayya-Bekaa) Blacksmith, carpenter and builder for 20 years, he is passionate about hunting, reading and collecting books.

Cheikh Farès DEIAYBES: (Chouwayya-Bekaa Ouest) Ferronnier, menuisier et constructeur depuis 20 ans, il est passionné par la chasse, la lecture et la collecte de livres.

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Druze Sheikhs of Lebanon
hammana
By Walid
09 Mar 2014

Sheikh Alaa ABOU Al-HISN (Ras el Metn) As a mechanic, Sheikh Alaa has been working with his father in their garage for 7 years. Feeding his passion for mechanics and automobiles, he has attended several courses in automotive diagnostics and currently attends seminars on the mechanics of 4x4 vehicles.

Cheikh Alaa ABOU Al-HISN (Ras el Metn) Mécanicien, il travaille avec son père dans leur garage depuis 7 ans. Il a suivi plusieurs formations en scanner diagnostique automobile et assiste actuellement à des séminaires sur la mécanique des voitures 4x4 dont il est passionné.

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Druze Sheikhs of Lebanon
Ras el Matn
By Walid
04 Feb 2014

Sheikh Alaa BOU RESLAN : (Ras El Metn) kickboxing Coach at the Hilal Al Nasr club for 10 years and employee at the religious court. Holding an official certificate of the Lebanese Federation of Kickboxing, he has been practicing the sport for 18 years. After obtaining his black belt, he won the Lebanon Cup several times and continually encourages the growth of the sport.

Cheikh Alaa BOU RESLAN : (Ras El Metn) Entraîneur de kickboxing au club Hilal Al Nasr depuis 10 ans et employé au tribunal religieux. Titulaire d'un certificat officiel de la Fédération Libanaise de kickboxing , il pratique ce sport depuis 18 ans. Apres l’obtention de sa ceinture noire, il Gagne la Coupe du Liban plusieurs fois et encourage continuellement la pratique de ce sport.

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Druze Sheikhs of Lebanon
Rashayya
By Walid
22 Aug 2013

Sheikh Ali AL QADAMANI( Rashayya) Boiler manufacturer for 10 years, he learned his job from his father. Sheikh al-Qadamani enjoys the job because he finds it creative, precise and complex.

Cheikh Ali AL QADAMANI( Rashayya) Fabriquant de chaudière depuis 10 ans, il apprend ce métier qu'il juge créatif, précis et complexe grâce à son père.

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Druze Sheikhs of Lebanon
Aghmeed
By Walid
05 May 2013

Sheikh Salah AL SAYFI: (Mechkiti) Entrepreneur. He has been practicing horse-riding for 30 years. His love for horses led him to establish an equestrian center that he has been managing for several years. He actively encourages the practice of horse riding, which he feels is beneficial for the body and soul, especially when it is exercised in nature.

Cheikh Salah AL SAYFI: (Mechkiti) Entrepreneur. Il pratique l'équitation depuis 30 ans. Son amour envers le cheval l’a poussé à fonder un centre équestre qu’il gère depuis plusieurs années. Il encourage la pratique de l'équitation qui est bénéfique pour le corps et l'âme, surtout quand elle est exercée dans la nature.