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Battle of Bakara Market
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Apr 2015

The internationally recognised Somali Government, the Transitional Federal Government, had been under siege since the Ethiopian Army pulled out in January 2009. Protected by a small force of Ugandan and Burundian soldiers deployed as the African Union's Mission to Somalia (AMISOM) the government was functioning in a 25 km2 pocket in the capital, Mogadishu, consisting of the State House Complex, the port and the airport base, where AMISOM had their HQ. In the fall of 2010 Al Shabaab attempted to push the government and the AMISOM forces into the sea in a large offensive referred to as the Ramadan Offensive, but AMISOM held their ground and eventually fought back. One of the main turning points of the conflict appeared at the end of July and beginning of August 2011, where combined AMISOM and government forces managed to push Al Shabaab out of Mogadishu, leaving the group wiht only limited footholds in the north and east of the capital.
The present collection depicts the fighting on the first two days of the offensive, where AMISOM and government forces attacked the Bakara Market in the attempt to dislodge the group from it main stronghold in the city.  

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Doctors Remove Bullet from Yemeni Gir...
Mualla, Aden
By Amged Sabeeh
12 Apr 2015

Warning: Graphic Content

This video shows doctors removing a bullet from a Yemeni girl without the use of Anesthetics in the southern city of Aden on Monday, April 13th.
The young girl was shot in the back of her head by an alleged Houthi sniper positioned on a top of a building. She screams and cries while the doctor attempts to pull out the bullet from her head.

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In Memory of the Heaven's Hundred 8
Kiev, Ukraine
By Max Kozmenko
26 Feb 2014

Bullet traces on a tree where a protester was killed.

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Cambodian prime minister Hun Sen's bo...
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Jul 2013

Cambodian prime minister Hun Sen's body guards have a joke with each other before starting their next watch. Siem Reap, Cambodia.

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Wounded Free Syrian Army Soldier
aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

A doctor attempted to remove a bullet from a wounded Free Syrian Army soldier's back after he arrived at a hospital having been shot by a sniper in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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Wounded Free Syrian Army Soldier
Aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

A wounded Free Syrian Army soldier being aided during an X-Ray procedure after he arrived at a hospital having been shot by a sniper in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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X-Ray of Bullet in Wounded Free Syria...
Aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

An X-Ray revealed a bullet in the chest of a wounded Free Syrian Army soldier who arrived at a hospital having been shot by a sniper in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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Bab-Al Tabbaneh Neighborhood, Lebanon
Tripoli, Lebanon
By justinsalhani
19 May 2013

Windows of a BMW in the Bab al-Tabbaneh neighborhood have been shot. Oddly, the car has California license plates.

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No-man's land on the drive into Azaz,...
Azaz, Syria
By Ms_R
14 Sep 2012

Although the border with Turkey remains open, the northernmost Syrian town of Azaz is still recovering from shelling that destroyed much of the town. Just getting into the town is a reminder of the carnage that continues right up to the border regions: a van transporting workers between Syria and Turkey displays bullet holes from fighting.

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The road into Azaz viewed through the...
Azaz, Syria,
By Ms_R
14 Sep 2012

Azaz has seen brutal fighting in order to secure the northernmost crossing with Turkey. The remnants of fighting and the subsequent shelling, that saw 50 dead, are seen throughout the town, in burnt-out tanks and piles of rubble.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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Cabinet Office clashes Cairo 36
Al-Qasr Al-Aini Street, Cairo, Egypt.
By Jeffrey Bright
17 Dec 2011

Protester holds up bullet casing to display that the military are using live ammunition against the protesters. According to the Egyptian health ministry, eight people have died and more than 300 people have been injured since the clashes began in Cairo on Friday. Al-Qasr Al-Aini Street, Cairo, Egypt. 17/12/2011

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Harvest the battle
Cairo, Egypt
By randoshka2000
11 Dec 2011

Two of the street children insisted that:
To portray what is left of the battle in Mohamed mahmoud st, a bullet in the form of small balls.

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Battle of Bakara Market 8
Mogadishu, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Jul 2011

Pushing up towards the Al Shabaab HQ located in the National Stadium AMISOM got involved in close quarter fighting in an area of two story buildings half a kilometer from the stadium. Receiving incoming fire from three sides and mortar shelling from the stadium, AMISOM fought back and established themselves in the buildings.

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Battle of Bakara Market 5
Mogadishu, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Jul 2011

An al-Shabab sniper fires at a Ugandan soldier as he crosses an open area on the frontline during the battle of Bakara Market in Mogadishu on 29 July 2011. Notice the bullet hitting the ground right behind the running soldier.

As AMISOM established a new frontline, Al Shabab was gathering forces and eventually launched a counter-attack.

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Battle of Bakara Market 6
Mogadishu, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Jul 2011

Somali heavy weaponry on the frontline during the battle of Bakara Market in Mogadishu.

Although still in its infancy, the Somali National Armytook part in the offensive and fought alongside AMISOM. Despite being a lose federation of four Somali clans, and using outdated and improvised equipment, the Somali National Army proved affective.

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Battle of Bakara Market 7
Mogadishu, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Jul 2011

A Ugandan T55 tank sits in the streets of Mogadishu during the battle of Bakara Market in Mogadishu.

AMISOM's superiority relied mostly on the fact that they could bring to bear superior firepower and in time tactics. The Ugandan T55 tank, designed around 1949, was the backbone of the AMISOM force and could provide close support to the infantry in the close quarter fighting in the narrow streets of Mogadishu.

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Battle of Bakara Market 1
Mogadishu, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
28 Jul 2011

Here A Ugandan AMISON soldier crosses a road under fire one hundred meters east of Bakara Market. As al-Shabab gathered reinforcements and AMISOM established a new defensive line, the offensive lost its momentum. Al-Shabab occupied positions in front of the AMISOM defensive line shooting and sniping at the soldiers while they tried to construct new defenses.

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Battle of Bakara Market 2
Mogadishu, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
28 Jul 2011

A Ugandan AMINSOM soldier near the frontline during the battle of Bakara Market in Mogadishu on 28 July 2011. AMISOM has been involved in an urban war since their arrival in Somalia. They have been fighting with weaponry dating back to the 1960s. Regardless, they fought an unrelenting war against al-Shabab. Ugandan soldiers making up most of the AMISOM force and the fighting has been bitter and deadly.

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Battle of Bakara Market 3
Mogadishu, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
28 Jul 2011

A Ugandan machine gunner at a fortification on the frontline during the battle of Bakara Market in Mogadishu on 28 July 2011.

On the morning of 28 July 2011, AMISOM forces pushed out from their defensive line and seized the area just below Bakara Market. Once the area was secured, the soldiers quickly set up new defensive positions to secure their gain from Al Shabaab counter attacks.

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Battle of Bakara Market 4
Mogadishu, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
28 Jul 2011

Urban warfare remains three-dimensional, with buildings and ruins providing numerous possibilities for cover and sniping positions. Here Ugandan soldiers scramble for cover as they come under fire during the battle of Bakara Market in Mogadishu.

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Fear and Ammo in a Texas Suburb (23 o...
Dallas, Texas
By Spike Johnson
01 Sep 2010

A survivalist group member reveals the ammunition he carries everywhere in his pistol. "On impact, the bullet compacts and starfishes around the hollowpoint, corkscrewing and ripping through organic tissue" he explains.