Thumb sm
Esplin120709_2350.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
09 Jul 2012

Hook and line fishing techniques are seen as a solution compared to large scale commercial methods like trawler nets, that are considered dramatically unsustainable. Commercial fishing is having a drastic impact on fish stocks around the globe. Populations of targeted species such as Bluefin Tuna and Cod have reduced 90% since the 1960s, according to professors at the University of British Columbia.

Thumb sm
Esplin120709_2349.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
09 Jul 2012

Hook and line fishing techniques are seen as a solution compared to large scale commercial methods like trawler nets, that are considered dramatically unsustainable. Commercial fishing is having a drastic impact on fish stocks around the globe. Populations of targeted species such as Bluefin Tuna and Cod have reduced 90% since the 1960s, according to professors at the University of British Columbia.

Thumb sm
Esplin120709_2347.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
09 Jul 2012

It is not only coral reefs that are affected by global warming. Other important environments, such as mangrove forests and sea grass beds, which provide habitats for hundreds of thousands of fish species and other organisms, are also threatened. Further destruction and loss to these domains will have profound effects on the productivity of costal regions and the lives of people reliant on them.

Thumb sm
Esplin120707_2383.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
07 Jul 2012

According to the WWF, “The decreased productivity of coastal ecosystems will reduce the food resources and income available to coastal communities in the Coral Triangle. By 2050, coastal ecosystems will only be able to provide 50% of the fish protein that they do today, leading to increasing pressure on coastal agriculture and aquaculture.”

Thumb sm
Esplin120705_2345.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
05 Jul 2012

The coral triangle is located in South East Asia and supports 120 million people, across 6 countries, over an area of 1.6 billion acres. Overfishing, pollution, overpopulation and climate change are putting this essential ecosystem in danger.

Thumb sm
Esplin120705_2344.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
05 Jul 2012

The coral triangle is located in South East Asia and supports 120 million people, across 6 countries, over an area of 1.6 billion acres. Overfishing, pollution, overpopulation and climate change are putting this essential ecosystem in danger.

Thumb sm
Esplin120705_2343.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
05 Jul 2012

Tourist diving boats float above a reef in the North-East Philippines. Such tours can have a devastating impact on the health of reefs as participants inevitably kick or displace coral formations. The excess pollution caused by nearby hotels and resorts are an often unseen yet leading factor to the decline of a reefs health.

Thumb sm
Esplin120705_2380.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
05 Jul 2012

The coral triangle is located in South East Asia and supports 120 million people, across 6 countries, over an area of 1.6 billion acres. Overfishing, pollution, overpopulation and climate change are putting this essential ecosystem in danger.

Thumb sm
Esplin120705_2388.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
05 Jul 2012

The coral triangle is located in South East Asia and supports 120 million people, across 6 countries, over an area of 1.6 billion acres. Overfishing, pollution, overpopulation and climate change are putting this essential ecosystem in danger.

Thumb sm
Esplin120704_2339.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
04 Jul 2012

Government statistics suggest that in one year 1,370 tons of coral trout alone were exported, creating revenues of US$140 million. The World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) disputes this figure; suggesting high incidences of illegal and unreported trafficking, significantly expand the official records. They go on to state relaxed trade agreements are one of the leading factors creating additional demand on the Philippines reefs resources.

Thumb sm
Esplin120704_2338.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
04 Jul 2012

Government statistics suggest that in one year 1,370 tons of coral trout alone were exported, creating revenues of US$140 million. The World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) disputes this figure; suggesting high incidences of illegal and unreported trafficking, significantly expand the official records. They go on to state relaxed trade agreements are one of the leading factors creating additional demand on the Philippines reefs resources.

Thumb sm
Esplin120704_2337.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
04 Jul 2012

According to the Coral Triangle initiative, “The impacts of overfishing and to some extent destructive fishing practices on coral reefs are evident in the biomass of reef associated fish." It is reported that more than 50% of the reef sites in the Philippines assessed are overfished.

Thumb sm
Roti
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
By Dominic.J.Lucarelli
24 Jun 2012

Spinning roti dough in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Thumb sm
Esplin120623_2381.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
23 Jun 2012

A fisherman farms abalone instead of heading out to sea to fish. Communities throughout the Philippines are being encouraged to seek alternative sources of income from fishing. According to the WWF, “The decreased productivity of coastal ecosystems will reduce the food resources and income available to coastal communities in the Coral Triangle. By 2050, coastal ecosystems will only be able to provide 50% of the fish protein that they do today, leading to increasing pressure on coastal agriculture and aquaculture.”

Thumb sm
Esplin120622_2389.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
22 Jun 2012

The cultivation of kelp and seaweed for pharmaceutical industries is being developed by some communities as an alternative source of income to prevent an over reliance of fishing for an income, thereby reducing the stress on local fish populations.

Thumb sm
minab city mall
5 Shanbe Bazar
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
21 Jun 2012

This is a small city in south of Iran that was famous for a mall that called (( 5 shanbe bazar or پنجشنبه بازار ))
she set a part of market and sell Tobacco .
Tobacco is something useful much here .all men and women use it in all of range of age.

Thumb sm
minab city mall
5 Shanbe Bazar
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
21 Jun 2012

This is a small city in south of Iran that was famous for a mall that called (( 5 shanbe bazar or پنجشنبه بازار ))
in this mall all people from this city sell everything they made by hand or come from their garden.
a famous Fruit garden at this city is mango and
date palm.

Thumb sm
Esplin120620_2327.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
20 Jun 2012

Children play in a harbour in the Southern Philippines. Scientists have predicted that by 2100, global temperature rise could result in the extinction of coral in the Coral Triangle. This would lead to an 80% reduction in regional food production.

Thumb sm
Esplin120619_2387.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
19 Jun 2012

A child helps sort the catch on a small fishing vessel in the Southern Philippines. With nine percent of the total global reef cover, its national waters provide significant annual fish yield. Increasingly, fish catch are being sold for export, with China and Hong Kong the primary destination.
There is a billion-dollar enterprise in the Asia-Pacific region for live reef food fish trade (LRRFFT). The Philippines is a significant contributor to this industry.

Thumb sm
Esplin120618_2379.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
18 Jun 2012

A Filipino fisherman wears a mask to protect against the sun as he spends the morning catching octopus from a small canoe. Though largely seen as being sustainable, subsistence fishermen with a hook and line can still have an impact on their local ecology. Jared Diamond, an ecological anthropologist, claims the common belief that indigenous people conserve their resources is wrong. He writes that historically when people encounter the limits of their resources, catastrophe results.

Thumb sm
Butcher
Jakarta, Indonesia
By Dominic.J.Lucarelli
08 Jun 2012

A butcher at a morning market in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Thumb sm
Washing up
Amman, Jordan
By MattKauffman
18 May 2012

Local boys, having just purchased color-dyed chicks at the flea market, wash up before noon prayer.

Thumb sm
Kabul Rush Hour
Kabul, Afghanistan
By MediaMikeDC
17 Mar 2012

A man taking his produce to market in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Frame 0004
Lebanese Authorities Continue Raids o...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Video Cairo Sat
15 Mar 2012

Beirut, Lebanon | March 14, 2012

The Lebanese authorities continue raids on food warehouses over the recent scandal of spoiled food, some of which having more than a year back expiration dates.
Five men are currently facing charges of attempted murder for knowingly processing and distributing spoiled food to the public.
President Michel Suleiman held a meeting Wednesday, March 14, with his ministers including PM Najib Mikati to discuss what he described as a "catastrophic" issue.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Lebanese Information Minister Walid Daouk:
"His Excellency Mr. President opened the meeting session, stressing the horribleness of the issue of spoiled food, with regard to the types and quantities of seized spoiled food, considering the issue catastrophic for threatening the food security of the Lebanese citizens and negatively affecting the reputation of Lebanon."
Suleiman called for merciless penalties for the importers, distributors and dealers of spoiled food.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: March 14, 2012
Shooting Location: Beirut, Lebanon
Publishing Time: March 14, 2012
Length: 0:01:36
Video Size: 72.5 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
Various shots of Lebanese State Security men raiding meat warehouses
Close up, a red waxed bag of spoiled food with a tag written on it "prohibited for expiration date passage"
Various shots of meet at raided warehouses
Various shots of different kinds of processed meat displayed for sale at one stores
Medium shot, Lebanese President Michel Suleiman heading to a meeting with the cabinet
Various shots of the meeting
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Lebanese Information Minister Walid Daouk:
"His Excellency Mr. President opened the meeting session, stressing the horribleness of the issue of spoiled food, with regard to the types and quantities of seized spoiled food, considering the issue catastrophic for threatening the food security of the Lebanese citizens and negatively affecting the reputation of Lebanon."
Various shots of the press conference after the meeting

Frame 0004
Suleiman Commends Lebanese Economy
Beirut, Lebanon
By Video Cairo Sat
12 Mar 2012

Lebanese President Michel Suleiman commended the country's economy as firm and stable in the face of financial crises over the past few years, he said on the ceremony held in Beirut on Monday, March 12, marking the 60th anniversary of the General Union of Arab Chambers of Commerce.
He added that Lebanon managed to avoid the ongoing tensions and crises in the region, hinting at the Syrian crisis, hoping peaceful solutions for them "within an Arab environment" in a way that responds to the legitimate demands of peoples.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Lebanese President Michel Suleiman:
"Lebanon, as you know, managed to overcome many obstacles over the past few years, the last of which was the worldwide financial crisis. It was able to avoid the negative consequences to the tensions and crises that emerged in its geographic region. Lebanon hopes for solutions of these crises in a peaceful way agreed upon by all parties and within an Arab environment, meeting the legitimate demands of peoples and their needs for freedom, democracy, stability and development."
Suleiman urged Arab businessmen to work on improving the Arab job market to provide better opportunities for the youth, stressing that social growth and personal liberties are a guarantee to develop freedom and justice.
He also called for connection between Arab financial markets and establishment of investment banks where Arab funds would participate to implement development projects, noting that Lebanon's banking sector achieved considerable growth over the past few years.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: March 12, 2012
Shooting Location: Beirut, Lebanon
Publishing Time: March 12, 2012
Length: 0:01:36
Video Size: 71.9 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Various shots of the ceremony marking the 60th anniversary of the General Union of Arab Chambers of Commerce
2. Various shots of Lebanese President Michel Suleiman heading to the podium to make a statement
3. Various shots of the attendant Arab businessmen while Suleiman speaking
4. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Lebanese President Michel Suleiman:
"Lebanon, as you know, managed to overcome many obstacles over the past few years, the last of which was the worldwide financial crisis. It was able to avoid the negative consequences to the tensions and crises that emerged in its geographic region. Lebanon hopes for solutions of these crises in a peaceful way agreed upon by all parties and within an Arab environment, meeting the legitimate demands of peoples and their needs for freedom, democracy, stability and development."
5. Various shots of Suleiman receiving an honoring gift from the head of the General Union of Arab Chambers of Commerce Adnan Kassar
6. Pan right, external shot of Adnan Kassar Edifice for Arab Economy, the headquarters of the General Union of Arab Chambers of Commerce

Thumb sm
A Destroyed Misrata (18-24)
Tripoli, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
24 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

Thumb sm
Life in Malawi 15
Zingwangwa, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
24 Dec 2011

In a dark corner of the indoor market, the rice trader attracts customers by playing local music on his stereo.
Zingwangwa is a low to middle income township of Blantyre, the biggest commercial city of Malawi.

Thumb sm
Life in Malawi 18
Blantyre, Southern Region, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
07 Dec 2011

In zingwangwa, the electricity is unreliable so many people cook on charcoal. Cutting trees fro charcoal results in deforestation.
Zingwangwa is a low to middle income township of Blantyre, the biggest commercial city of Malawi.

Thumb sm
Herbal High (11 of 18)
Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
17 Jun 2011

Eastleigh is a densely populated Somali neighbourhood in Nairobi, Kenya. It is an economic hub for cheap goods and rumored to be a safe haven for militia group Al Shabaab, whose activities have been funded by the khat trade. Khat is a a leafy stimulant native to the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. In these areas, khat chewing has a long history as a social custom dating back thousands of years. Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya. June, 2011.

Frame 0004
What a Trip! Cycling from Germany to ...
Germany, Tschech Republik, Poland, Ukraine, Russia, Kazakhstan, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore
By Maximilian Semsch
02 May 2008

In 2008 Maximilian Semsch at the age of 24 cycled from Munich to Singapore to find out more about himself and to go on a real adventure, as life must be more than just working. He did the journey all by himself, without the help of a professional camera team. As there was no one to talk to, his camera became his best friend during the trip. His journey started in May 2008 in his hometown Munich. His route took him through Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine into Russia and further on to Kazakhstan. Semsch then did hit rock bottom, as he was refused a visa and couldn't enter China. After days of consideration he did decide to skip China and flew to Thailand. His route through south-east Asia took him from Thailand to Cambodia back into Thailand and via Malaysia he finally reached Singapore, after 211 days and 13.500km on his bike. Semsch recorded everything on his trip. The nice and helpful people he bumped into, drinking vodka in Russia with complete strangers and its aftermath of a hangover the next day but he also tells about his fight against loneliness, heat and extreme headwind. He always does it in a very personal way that gives the audience the feeling of sitting on the back of his bike.

Thumb sm
Leper Community In Addis Ababa (17 of...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
21 Jul 2007

Kelebe Adamu with her blue head scarf (C) is checking out good deals at the local market where charcoal is sold by locals from the countryside in the leper slum in Northern Addis Ababa July 21 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Charcoal is in the slum the only way to heat up during the winter months of July and August.

Thumb sm
Leper Community In Addis Ababa (18 of...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Jul 2007

One of Kelebe's neighbors is greeting her after her return form the market, inside the slum for lepers in Northern Addis Ababa July 18 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. This woman has had a bad case of leprosy for many years, which has attacked her fingers and hands.

Thumb sm
Leper Community In Addis Ababa (15 of...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Jul 2007

The second in charge (C), a woman with leprosy is watching for any inperfection in her worker's labor inside the workshop building inside the lepers slum of Northern Addis Ababa July 8 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Each piece made is reviewed by her and some help before it can be sold on the markets or to foreigners.