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Corona Virus (MERS) in Saudi Arabia
By Nina Arif
22 May 2014

Corona Virus Script

Residents in the Saudi capital remain concerned, as the spread of the Middle East respiratory Syndrome - Corona Virus, shows no sign of slowing down.

Corona, which is a deadlier derivative of the SARS virus, has now resulted in more than 200 deaths and close to 600 infections across the Kingdom.

In response, the Saudi government has stepped up its campaign to increase awareness of the virus and encourage people to take precautions to prevent infection.
Text messages like this one from the Ministry of Health advise people to do things like cover their mouths when they cough and wash their hands regularly.

Crowded areas make it easier for corona to spread and so schools and universities have been at the forefront of the government's drive.

But concerned parents of university students have been calling for final exams to be brought forward, so students can leave early. This, after 4 girls at a leading Riyadh university became infected with the virus last month. Students at the university remain cautious...

[SOUNDBITES from university students]

But not all Saudis worry about the spread of the Corona Virus.

This humorous take on MERS [VIDEO] suggests that people's fears are exaggerated and that Saudis are becoming paranoid of catching the virus from each other.... In fact most human infections did not occur in this way .

The World Health Organisation says the majority of infections happened in health-care facilities, raising questions over the adequacy of measures to protect hospital staff.

The world health organisation says camels are the likely source of MERS. The Saudi Agriculture ministry recently warned people to wear protective clothes when dealing with the animals - prompting a backlash from farmers who mocked the advise of ministers with videos like this. [VIDEO OF CAMEL FARMERS].

So far, no travel restrictions have been place on Saudi Arabia. But the recent increase in infections has raised fears over the huge influx of visitors expected during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan and the subsequent hajj pilgrimage in October.

The world health organisation has advised vulnerable people such as pregnant women and the elderly not to make the pilgrimage.

-Hand sanitizer - face mask

  • cleaners / sanitation equipment

-GVs - streets, kingdom tower, shops malls -pharmacies - hospitals - ambulances - MOH website

  • text message from MOH -MERS paranoia video clip
  • camel farmers video -Medina footage
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The Daily Dose | Tuberculosis in Camb...
Takeo, Cambodia
By Aman Singh
12 Jul 2013

A female peasant in a village consuming her daily dose of TB medication.

Cambodia is one of the 22 countries most affected by tuberculosis in the world. The country ranks second in the prevalence rate of tuberculosis, after South Africa. To get cured, the patients have to go through a stringent six-months daily-dose therapy of multiple medications. Often, these medications cause severe side-effects and co-infections with other diseases like HIV/AIDS, Cancer, etc make the lives of patients impossible due to drug interactions. This leads to lack of compliance which may result in multi-drug resistant TB, a lethal form of the disease and almost a death warrant. Once infected, the cure from this disease under the public sector of such a country is not a small hope to live by. Therefore, there is a stark dejection in the lives of people suffering from tuberculosis.

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Older population more vulnerable | Tu...
Takeo, Cambodia
By Aman Singh
12 Jul 2013

An old female patient with TB medicines in hand. Though the disease prevalence varies by country, TB tends to infect older people more as compared to other age groups. This is enhanced in poor population due to malnutrition and weak immune systems.

Cambodia is one of the 22 countries most affected by tuberculosis in the world. The country ranks second in the prevalence rate of tuberculosis, after South Africa. To get cured, the patients have to go through a stringent six-months daily-dose therapy of multiple medications. Often, these medications cause severe side-effects and co-infections with other diseases like HIV/AIDS, Cancer, etc make the lives of patients impossible due to drug interactions. This leads to lack of compliance which may result in multi-drug resistant TB, a lethal form of the disease and almost a death warrant. Once infected, the cure from this disease under the public sector of such a country is not a small hope to live by. Therefore, there is a stark dejection in the lives of people suffering from tuberculosis.

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Isolation | Tuberculosis in Cambodia
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Aman Singh
12 Jul 2013

The TB patients admitted in the government hospitals are kept in separate wards away from the administration and other areas.

Cambodia is one of the 22 countries most affected by tuberculosis in the world. The country ranks second in the prevalence rate of tuberculosis, after South Africa. To get cured, the patients have to go through a stringent six-months daily-dose therapy of multiple medications. Often, these medications cause severe side-effects and co-infections with other diseases like HIV/AIDS, Cancer, etc make the lives of patients impossible due to drug interactions. This leads to lack of compliance which may result in multi-drug resistant TB, a lethal form of the disease and almost a death warrant. Once infected, the cure from this disease under the public sector of such a country is not a small hope to live by. Therefore, there is a stark dejection in the lives of people suffering from tuberculosis.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
29 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Child infected by leishmania, a skin disease that is passed on by an insect that looks like a big mosquito and is devastating this rural region. It provokes red stings which attack the skin. Before the revolution, an insecticide was spread in order to kill the insect. No humanitarian organization is supporting the sick people.
Un enfant atteint de la leishmaniose. Cette maladie de peau transmise par un insecte ressemblant à un gros moustique fait des ravages dans cette région rurale. Il provoque des boutons qui rongent la peau. Avant la révolution, un insecticide était diffusé pour éradiquer l'insecte. Aucune organisation humanitaire ne vient en aide aux malades.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Hygiene is very bad on the Shansharah archeological site, Idlib region. They fled the air strikes without being able to bring their personal belongings.

Les conditions d'hygiène des populations déplacées dans le site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb sont déplorables. Ils ont fui les bombardements sans pouvoir emporter leurs affaires personnelles.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

A baby infected by leishmania, a skin disease that is passed on by an insect that looks like a big mosquito and is devastating this rural region. It provokes red stings which attack the skin. Before the revolution, an insecticide was spread in order to kill the insect. No humanitarian organization is supporting the sick people.

Bébé atteint de la leishmaniose. Cette maladie de peau transmise par un insecte ressemblant à un gros moustique fait des ravages dans cette région rurale. Il provoque des boutons qui rongent la peau. Avant la révolution, un insecticide était diffusé pour éradiquer l'insecte. Aucune organisation humanitaire ne vient en aide aux malades.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
04 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
04 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
04 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar's Fight Against Social Stigma
Kathmandu, Nepal
By U.S. Editor
03 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is one of many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle. He is now trying to reintegrate into society despite his condition, and is working hard to achieve his lifelong dream of becoming a singer.

Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society. It has now been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.

He took advantage of the help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” of telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it from his wife.” The right moment, however, eventually arrived, after nearly a decade of secrecy.

“It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”

Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to become a singer. HIs first song, “Mod,” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” said Raj Kumar, looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he began using drugs, eventually becoming addicted. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, finally found out about his substance abuse problem.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 among them were children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were transmitted sexually. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years, and government figures now estimate HIV prevalence in the adult population to be at 0.3 percent.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. High-risk groups in the country include intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, and migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
23 Mar 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
23 Mar 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
23 Mar 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
27 Nov 2012

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
27 Nov 2012

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Egypt's Agriculture Ministry: 6,000 L...
Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
23 Mar 2012

Cairo, Egypt | March 22, 2012

Egypt's Ministry of Agriculture said in its daily report on Thursday, March 22, that the outbreak of foot and mouth disease (FMD) left at least 6,000 Livestock dead and 46,000 infected so far.
On the other hand, the FMD that spread throughout 25 governorates in Egypt threatens to prevail in North Africa and the Middle East causing a regional food security issue according to the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).
Investors and livestock farm owners, as well as veterinarians, believe that the government is to blame because of neither practicing strict preventive measures at the early stage of the FMD appearance nor providing a vaccine for the disease.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Kamel Girgis, investor at the European Countryside farming project in Egypt:
"FMD is spreading and we resort to preventive means. We do not be negligent in raising the animals. We perform something like quarantine and we raise the animal quality at the same time. We also add Sodium bicarbonates to the water to prevent infection, cleaning the floors well. However, the effective vaccine hasn’t been provided by the state yet."

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mustafa Fahmy, veterinarian specialized in animal medicine and surgery:
"There should have been preventive measures, preventing transpiration among governorates and shutting off marketplaces. That should’ve been done two months ago! The government make decisions now when it's too late, which is useless. On the other hand, where is the role of vet quarantine authorities?"

However, medical sources said the country has recently started to produce local vaccine to contain the issue.
Some Egyptians are reluctant to eat meat due to the FMD issue, resorting to chicken and fish as alternatives, while others think the FMD outbreak is a rumor and they continue buying meat, particularly that supervised by the army vet units.
SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Egyptian butcher:
"The customers were afraid that the meat might be infected of the disease. They feared to buy it. Praise be to Allah, they started to buy from us because they trust us. The meat is very good and there is nothing wrong with it."

SOUNDBITE 4 (Arabic) – Egyptian woman outside the butchery:
"The meat is good but they made us afraid because of the FMD issue. Afterwards, the prices of chicken and fish rose."

SOUNDBITE 5 (Arabic) – Egyptian man outside the butchery:
"For me, I have no problem because I know that 75% of the livestock were slaughtered before the FMD appeared. On the other hand, the meat supervised by the army is trustworthy because the army has a vet unit that tests the meat and any food and they care for the good of the people and the country. They cannot harm the citizens." Unexpectedly, poultry and fish sellers complain lower sales although they are the safe alternative for concerned Egyptians. This is because merchants raised their prices as a consequence of the FMD.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: March 22, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: March 22, 2012
Length: 0:03:18
Video Size: 163 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Various external shots of Egypt's Ministry of Agriculture in Cairo
2- Various shots of a livestock farm at the Cairo-Alexandria desert road
3- Various shots of livestock at the farm
4- Various shots of dead animals thrown in a vast area outside the farm
5- Long shot outside the farm
6- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Kamel Girgis, investor at the European Countryside farming project in Egypt:
"FMD is spreading and we resort to preventive means. We do not be negligent in raising the animals. We perform something like quarantine and we raise the animal quality at the same time. We also add Sodium bicarbonates to the water to prevent infection, cleaning the floors well. However, the effective vaccine hasn’t been provided by the state yet." 7- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mustafa Fahmy, veterinarian specialized in animal medicine and surgery:
"There should have been preventive measures, preventing transpiration among governorates and shutting off marketplaces. That should’ve been done two months ago! The government make decisions now when it's too late, which is useless. On the other hand, where is the role of vet quarantine authorities?"
8- Various shots of livestock at the farm
9- Pan right, a marketplace in Cairo
10- Various shots of a butchery
11- Various shots of animal meat displayed at the butchery
12- Various shots of a butcher chopping the meat
13- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Egyptian butcher:
"The customers were afraid that the meat might be infected of the disease. They feared to buy it. Praise be to Allah, they started to buy from us because they trust us. The meat is very good and there is nothing wrong with it." 14- SOUNDBITE 4 (Arabic) – Egyptian woman outside the butchery:
"The meat is good but they made us afraid because of the FMD issue. Afterwards, the prices of chicken and fish rose." 15- SOUNDBITE 5 (Arabic) – Egyptian man outside the butchery:
"For me, I have no problem because I know that 75% of the livestock were slaughtered before the FMD appeared. On the other hand, the meat supervised by the army is trustworthy because the army has a vet unit that tests the meat and any food and they care for the good of the people and the country. They cannot harm the citizens." 16- Various shots of the marketplace
17- Various shots of chicken displayed for sale at the marketplace
18- Various shots of women buying chicken
19- Medium shot of the marketplace