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Burned Churches of Minya
Minya, Egypt
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Aug 2013

Burned wrecks of school buses in the yard of a Jesuit Church in Al Minya, Egypt that has been attacked by unkown men on August 14th, 2013.

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Burned School Buses
Al Minya, Egypt
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Aug 2013

Burned bus wrecks in the yard of a Jesuit Church in Al Minya, Egypt that has been attacked by unkown men on August 14th, 2013.

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Burned Churches of Minya
Al Minya, Egypt
By Daniel Van Moll
26 Aug 2013

Remains of the priest's office in the coptic Prince Tadros church in Al Minya. Allegedly 500 people rushed to the building on August 14th around noon, throwing Molotov cocktails and gas bombs. Three church workers were trapped in the church until the morning of August 15th. (Al Minya, Egypt)

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Coptic Christians in Athens protest k...
Athens,Greece
By Nikolas Georgiou
12 Apr 2013

Coptic Egyptian Christians living in Athens, Greece protest the recent violence committed against the Coptic community living in Egypt. They staged a play depicting the attacks, followed by a prayer in both Greek and Arabic languages.

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Coptic Christians in Athens protest k...
Athens,Greece
By Nikolas Georgiou
12 Apr 2013

Coptic Egyptian Christians living in Athens, Greece protest the recent violence committed against the Coptic community living in Egypt. They staged a play depicting the attacks, followed by a prayer in both Greek and Arabic languages.

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Coptic Christians in Athens protest k...
Athens,Greece
By Nikolas Georgiou
12 Apr 2013

Coptic Egyptian Christians living in Athens, Greece protest the recent violence committed against the Coptic community living in Egypt. They staged a play depicting the attacks, followed by a prayer in both Greek and Arabic languages.

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Coptic Christians in Athens protest k...
Athens, Greece
By Nikolas Georgiou
12 Apr 2013

Coptic Egyptian Christians living in Athens, Greece protest the recent violence committed against the Coptic community living in Egypt. They staged a play depicting the attacks, followed by a prayer in both Greek and Arabic languages.

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Garbage City (9 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic woman is walking pass a bridal store inside the slum.

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Garbage City (10 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic man is carrying on his back a pack of cartons before loeading it on a truck.

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Garbage City (11 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic man is filling his truck with animal carcasses.

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Garbage City (12 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic man is showing off his Christian tatoos.

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Garbage City (13 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic woman is going inside her home in an area where running water no longer works.

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Garbage City (14 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic man is pushing recycled plastic bottles onto a truck.

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Garbage City (16 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Copts are walking on a side street inside the slum.

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Garbage City (17 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A young Coptic girl is fixing her front porch inside the slum.

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Garbage City (18 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A young Muslim man is using a machine that makes parts for bread making machines sold to bakeries.

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Garbage City (19 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Muslim man who lives and works inside the slum owns a small shop that makes parts for bread making machines.

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Garbage City (20 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Minah and Anna both owned a plastic recycling shop.

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Garbage City (21 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic watch maker is working late inside his shop.

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Garbage City (22 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 20, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Coptic priests are giving the Communion to locals inside the church of Sint Simon, built over 500 years ago.

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Garbage City (23 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 20, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic priest is helping a woman with some water inside the church of Sint Simon, built over 500 years ago.

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Garbage City (24 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 20, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic man is picking up plastic bottles ready to be recycled.

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Garbage City (25 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 20, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Coptic men are digging in the ground to future toilets in the house still under construction.

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Garbage City (26 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 20, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic woman is standing near a stairwell inside her home next to posters of slain Coptic martyrs.

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Garbage City (27 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 20, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Coptic men are taking tea on a side street of the slum next to a poster of Coptic pope Theodoros II.

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Garbage City (28 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 20, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A general view of the Garbage City slum.

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Garbage City (29 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A car is transporting a massive amount of to be recycled material into the slum.

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Garbage City (2 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Mar 2013

March 16, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Mased Abd El Yamin is holding a picture of his late father inside the family home.

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Garbage City (1 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Mar 2013

March 16, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic man who recycles plastic bottles inside the Coptic slum is talking to his workers.

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Garbage City (3 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Mar 2013

March 16, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Children of the Yamin family are playing inside the family home. The Yamin family makes a living recycling used clothing.

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Garbage City (4 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Mar 2013

March 16, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Members of the Yamin family are taking a rest inside the family home. The Yamin family makes a living recycling used clothing.

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Garbage City (5 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Mar 2013

March 16, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A neighbor is visiting the Yamin family. The Yamin family makes a living recycling used clothing.

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Garbage City (7 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. An elder Coptic man is taking in the sun on the main street inside the slum.

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Garbage City (8 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Mar 2013

March 16, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Coptic children are playing on the roof top of one of the many builsings inside the slum.

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Garbage City (6 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Mar 2013

March 16, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Mased Abd El Yamin is walking out of the family home where he and his family recycles used clothing for a living.

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Garbage City (15 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Coptic women are going about their day inside the slum.

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Garbage City
Cairo, Egypt
By Mais Istanbuli
17 Mar 2013

Mokattam village, or Garbage City, as it is known by the locals, is a slum settlement at the base of Mokattam Hill on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt. The slum is populated by a community of workers called Zabbaleen, who personally collect, sort, re-use, re-sell or otherwise repurpose Cairo’s waste. Over 90 percent of the population is Coptic Christian.
This shocking photo essay reveals the reality of thousands of Egyptians who for generations have been living and working among mountains of stinking rubbish, with no access to running water, sewage, or electricity.

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Thousands of Copts outside Egyptian S...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
09 Oct 2012

Thousands of Egyptian Copts marched from the district of Shubra near downtown Cairo to the state radio and television building, on Tuesday evening, October 9, marking the first anniversary of the Maspero clashes between protesting Copts and army soldiers that resulted in 27 deaths.
The protestors were chanting national songs with music playing in the background, shouting statements against former the Field Marshall who was the head of Egypt’s ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) at that time.
Not only Copts who participated in the march, but a lot of Muslims marched with them to show solidarity with their fellow Egyptians, all calling for retaliation for the victims of Maspero clashes.
During the march, some shouted statements like “The people want execution of the Field Marshall," while others carried banners of Tantawi and his deputy Sami Anan execution ropes around their necks.
They demanded justice for those killed when military and security forces violently dispersed a Coptic sit-in outside the state TV building against assaults on Coptic churches at the time.
The Maspero Youth Union, which was formed in March 2011 to defend the rights of Egypt’s Coptic minority, organized the march while many other movements participated in the march like the April 6 Youth Movement, the Democratic Revolutionary Alliance, Hamdeen Sabbahi’s new Popular Current Part and other coalitions and parties.
The deadly incident occurred when a peaceful march against the destruction of a church in Aswan and the authorities' subsequent inaction was confronted by the military near the building in Maspero, central Cairo, on October 9, 2011, killing at least 27.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 9, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 9, 2012
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Long shot of Coptic protestors holding a big poster of Mina Daniel marching from Shoubra district to the Egyptian State Television building marking the first anniversary of clashes with Army last year
2. Wide shot of the protestors in the march, and some are holding crucifixes while a loud music is playing
3. Long shot of some protestors holding a man from Al-Azhar while he’s chanting “Retaliation is the solution”
4. Various shots of the protestors in the march shouting “Retaliation”, while loud music is playing
5. Wide shot of the march while the music is still playing
6. Long shot of Egyptian women in pharaonic outfits raising posters of victims of maspero clashes back in 2011
7. Wide shot of some of the protestors holding a large black banner with large red cross on the middle of it
8. Medium shot of a protestor holding the Bible and the Holy Quran
9. Wide shot of the march and the women in the pharaonic outfits are walking in the forefront
10. Long shot of girls wearing black t-shirts with large red crosses on it, and holding large circles of flowers
11. Medium shot of Head of The Egyptian Social Democratic Party, Mohamed Abu Alghar walking with some priests in the march
12. Various long shots of the protestors in front of the Egyptian State Television building chanting
13. Medium shot of some protestors kicking and burning a stuffed figure in army uniform representing former Head of Military Police Hamdy Badeen
14. Close, pan left shot of the protestors raising their hands with victory signs, while loud music is playing
15. Wide shot of the protestors in front of the Egyptian State Television building chanting
16. Archived various shots of militaries armored vehicles attacking the protestors who respond with hurling stones and trying to block their way with cars

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Egypt's Al-Azhar and Church Officials...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
04 Apr 2012

Cairo, Egypt | April 4, 2012

Interim leader of Egypt's Coptic Orthodox Church Bishop Bakhomious, who temporarily replaced late Pope Shenouda, met with Grand Imam of Al-Azhar, Shiekh Ahmed al-Tayyib on Wednesday, April 4, at Al-Azhar headquarters in Cairo, where they expressed their rejection of the constitution-writing panel tasked with drafting Egypt’s new constitution which is dominated by Islamists, particularly the Muslim Brotherhood.

They stressed that the current panel doesn’t offer fair representation of all Egyptians, particularly the minorities.

Bakhomious said that the democracy doesn’t mean the dictatorship of the majority.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Bishop Bakhomious, Coptic Orthodox Church interim leader:
"Democracy is not the dictatorship of the majority. The governing of the people, which is democracy, means involving all categories of society including the very small minorities."

For his part, Dr. Mahmoud Azab, Grand Imam of Al-Azhar's adviser on dialogue showed complete agreement with Bishop Bakhomious and warned that if the constitution committee did not represent all Egyptians including minorities, the nation's unity would be "in danger".

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - Mahmoud Azab, Grand Imam of Al-Azhar's adviser on dialogue:
"The Egyptian people must agree politically to the country's common good. Political agreement, like Bishop Bakhomious said, doesn’t mean the dictatorship of the majority but it means that the majority run the affairs while the minorities have their weight, including all forms of intellectual, religious and sectarian minorities. This is a matter of agreement between us and Egypt's Church and between average civilian Muslims and the Christians. Otherwise, the nation's ship is in danger."

Bishop Bakhomious denied that there was a deal between Al-Azhar and the Church to withdraw from the panel.

The Coptic Orthodox Church in Egypt announced its withdrawal from the panel few days after the withdrawal of Al-Azhar, the highest religious authority in the Sunni Muslim world, claiming the panel is illegitimate.

Egyptian Court is scheduled to rule on the validity of the controversial constitution-writing panel on April 10.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: April 4, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: April 4, 2012
Length: 0:01:51
Video Size: 91.7 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Tilt down, external shot of Al-Azhar headquarters in Cairo
2- Medium shot of Grand Imam of Al-Azhar, Sheikh Ahmed al-Tayyib, receiving Bishop Bakhomious
3- Pan left shot of Al-Tayyib and Bakhomious heading to the meeting hall
4- Various shots of the meeting
5- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Bishop Bakhomious, Coptic Orthodox Church interim leader:
"Democracy is not the dictatorship of the majority. The governing of the people, which is democracy, means involving all categories of society including the very small minorities." 6- Various shots of Bakhomious speaking to reporters after the meeting
7- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mahmoud Azab, Grand Imam of Al-Azhar's adviser on dialogue:
"The Egyptian people must agree politically to the country's common good. Political agreement, like Bishop Bakhomious said, doesn’t mean the dictatorship of the majority but it means that the majority run the affairs while the minorities have their weight, including all forms of intellectual, religious and sectarian minorities. This is a matter of agreement between us and Egypt's Church and between average civilian Muslims and the Christians. Otherwise, the nation's ship is in danger."
8- Various shots of Bakhomious leaving Al-Azhar headquarters after the meeting

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Egypt MPs Elect Constitution-Writing ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
24 Mar 2012

Cairo, Egypt | March 24, 2012

A debatable session was held between Egypt’s two houses of parliament, the People's Assembly and the Shura Council on Saturday, March 24, for electing the 100 members of the committee that will be responsible for writing the country's new constitution.

Meanwhile, hundreds of people, mostly liberals and Copts, gathered outside Cairo International Conference Center, where the poll was held, amid intense security presence to protest against the legitimacy of the formation of the constitution-writing panel with 50% parliamentarians, voicing concern about Islamist domination of the new constitution.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohamed Khattab, founding member of Union of Independents for Egypt:
"The constitution is for the next generations. So, all generations and ideologies should be represented. A single faction should not dominate writing the constitution. 50% of the panel cannot be parliamentarians, because they will also select the other 50% and of course they will not select someone against their vision."

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Egyptian Copt:
"Everyone tries to protect themselves. The Islamists protect themselves through writing the constitution at our expense. This is not good at all. They should consider the rights of others. We elected them and supported them because they were oppressed and persecuted by the former regime, etc. So, they shouldn't ruin us once they get to power."

A number of MPs, political activists and revolutionary movements criticized the criteria on which the panel formation is based, fearing the country is heading towards a religious direction with Islamists having the upper hand in the parliament.

The protestors raised signs against domination of Egypt's constitution by a certain group, referring to Islamists, calling for a civil state and a constitutional panel representing all categories of the society.

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Protestor:
"The constitution is the dream of the Egyptian people. I wish it wouldn’t have privileges for a certain group of the people such as the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafis. It shouldn’t also have any guarantees for the SCAF through constitutional articles protecting them against punishment or trial for the mistakes of the transitional period. There shouldn't be a central power for anyone writing the constitution."

Parliament Speaker Mohamed Saad al-Katatni announced last week that the 100-member committee will be composed of 50 parliamentarians and 50 figures from outside the parliament.

The liberal Egyptian Bloc, which includes three parties, withdrew from due to what they described as lack of proper criteria for the panel formation.

The protestors said the constitution-writing panel is the beginning of the end of January 25 Revolution.
Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: March 24, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: March 24, 2012
Length: 0:02:54
Video Size: 143 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

1- Medium external shot, large sign of Cairo International Conference Center
2- Various shots of protestors outside the Conference Center raising signs and shouting statements against the panel formation
3- Various shots of liberal parliamentarians, including famous liberal Amr Hamzawi, talking at a corridor outside the conference hall
4- Various shots of the voting process inside the conference hall
5- Medium shot, Parliament Speaker Mohamed Saad al-Katatni
6- Medium shot, a young man with a painted mask sitting on the ground and holding a sign expressing rejection
7- Various shots of the protest
8- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohamed Khattab, founding member of Union of Independents for Egypt:
"The constitution is for the next generations. So, all generations and ideologies should be represented. A single faction should not dominate writing the constitution. 50% of the panel cannot be parliamentarians, because they will also select the other 50% and of course they will not select someone against their vision." 9- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Egyptian Copt:
"Everyone tries to protect themselves. The Islamists protect themselves through writing the constitution at our expense. This is not good at all. They should consider the rights of others. We elected them and supported them because they were oppressed and persecuted by the former regime, etc. So, they shouldn't ruin us once they get to power." 10- Various shots of MPs at the conference hall
11- Various shots of liberal and Islamist MPs leaving and walking at the corridor
12- Various shots of the protest amid intense security presence
13- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Protestor:
14- "The constitution is the dream of the Egyptian people. I wish it wouldn’t have privileges for a certain group of the people such as the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafis. It shouldn’t also have any guarantees for the SCAF through constitutional articles protecting them against punishment or trial for the mistakes of the transitional period. There shouldn't be a central power for anyone writing the constitution."
15- Various shots of protestors outside the Conference Center raising signs and shouting statements against the panel formation