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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 16
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

DRC contestants Soudi Fatou (left) and Thethe Ntumba talk backstage between acts.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 17
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

Stella gets her make up done for the “native” part of the event, where music from all 5 countries is played.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 18
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

One of the many wardrobe changes that take place during the event.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 19
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

The view from backstage as participants in Miss Mama Kilo 2015 enter the stage.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 20
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

The "native" performance is the last act contestants have to perform alone in front judges and a packed crowd.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 21
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

Soudi Fatou dances during the native performance. This year's jury came from Mali, Ivory Coast and Benin.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 22
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

Nelly Okombi, from Republic of Congo, won the 7th edition of Miss Mama Kilo. As the new Miss Mama Kilo, she gets a weekend trip to Paris offered by one of the sponsors. This is Congo's third crown in seven years, but all of the contestants received cash prizes regardless of the their result.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 10
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

Preparations continue until the day of the event at the Olympic Palace Hotel.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 11
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

The event starts at 19H00, however contestants arrive early in the morning to get their hair and make up done.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 12
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

Two contestants help each other prepare their hair in the backstage area of Miss Mama Kilo 2015.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 13
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

Make up artists work all night on the day of Miss Mama Kilo. The event has 6 wardrobe changes, and contestants' makeup has to match each style.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 14
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

Stella waits with the other contestants in anticipation, just moments before going on stage.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 15
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

All 18 contestants carry their countries' flags. Republic of Congo was the most represented with five contestants.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 23
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

Nelly Okombi from Congo took home the title of Miss Mama Kilo 2015.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 07
Brazzaville
By Patrick
02 Apr 2015

The last rehearsal takes place at the Olympic Palace Hotel the day before the ceremony.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 08
Brazzaville
By Patrick
02 Apr 2015

Magalie Opangot from Republic of Congo (left) and Jenny Elongo from Central African Republic share a moment together during rehearsal. It´s the third time they participate side by side in Miss Mama Kilo.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 09
Brazzaville
By Patrick
02 Apr 2015

Rosine surveys the runway during the last rehearsal at the Continental Palace Hotel. She directs contestants with a firm hand at all times.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 05
Brazzaville
By Patrick
01 Apr 2015

Stella Amoussou, from Porto Novo, Benin, runs a little cosmetic shop in Brazzaville with her family.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 06
Brazzaville
By Patrick
01 Apr 2015

Julie Mangono, a comedian from Kinshasa, and Stella are close. Miss Mama Kilo has a friendly atmosphere where contestants always help each other out.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 01
Brazzaville
By Patrick
26 Mar 2015

This year´s edition drew contestants from five countries: Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola, Benin and the Central African Republic.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 04
Brazzaville
By Patrick
26 Mar 2015

Stella Amoussou is from Porto Novo, Benin. She moved to Brazzaville 15 years ago. Rosine approached her in the street and asked her to be part of this year´s Miss Mama Kilo.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 02
Brazzaville
By Patrick
25 Mar 2015

Contestants rehearse twice a week at Rosine´s restaurant in Brazzaville.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 03
Brazzaville
By Patrick
25 Mar 2015

Rehearsals become an attraction in the neighbourhood.

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Life after Ebola in Liberia: A Diffic...
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to everyday life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems. Survivors living on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia share their experiences of illness, loss, and coping with a new reality as the disease is slowly but surely eradicated from their area.

"People were talking a lot about the disease. You shouldn't shake any hands to prevent getting the disease," Mammie Bindah, 38, said.

Still her husband who was working at a treatment clinic got the disease. Mammie took care for him for about two weeks before he died. In the process, Mammie contracted Ebola. She was throwing up blood when she got to the ETU. This is where she fought the disease for 20 days.

"After 12 days I started feeling a bit better,” she said. “When I recovered, I found out that my children ran away out of fear. It took a while before they returned back home."

After one week of throwing up, Bindu, 23, went to a hospital in her district. She couldn't eat anything for a over 10 days. All her family members around her also caught the virus. She is the only one survivor and in her community people are afraid to speak to her in fear of getting the disease.

Helena Henry (30) and her brother were the first of her household to get Ebola from a younger cousin who was staying over. He died at the age of four-years-old, and soon after, more people in her family became ill.

"After calling for an ambulance for over 12 days, they finally showed up,” she said. “But in the meantime, my younger brother already died here in house."

She went to the ETU for treatment, but some people were afraid to go there, so they remained at home. After three weeks fighting for her life, she survived Ebola. Returning home, she found out that her husband, her sister and another brother, her aunt & uncle and their daughter and sister-in-law also caught the virus.

"None of them survived,” she said. “Now I live in a empty house, taking care of my two children, four children of my mother and one of my brother." She relies on food aid from World Food Program to get by. "When this aid stops, I don't know how I can feed 7 children."

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Ebola Survivors 01
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

"People were talking a lot about the disease. You shouldn't shake any hands to prevent getting the disease," Mammie Bindah, 38, said.

Still her husband who was working at a treatment clinic got the disease. Mammie took care for him for about two weeks before he died. In the process, Mammie contracted Ebola. She was throwing up blood when she got to the ETU. This is where she fought the disease for 20 days.

"After 12 days I started feeling a bit better,” she said. “When I recovered, I found out that my children ran away out of fear. It took a while before they returned back home."

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Maternal issues through Ebola 05
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Health workers were afraid to accept Comfort at the local hospital when she needed to give birth. They thought she might be caught with Ebola, so they turned her away. Comfort is aiming at the spot right on the streets where she gave birth. To twins. In the rain.

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Ebola Survivors 08
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Rosanna's organization helps Ebola survivors to cope with the loss around Ebola.

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Ebola Survivors 09
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Beds of Ebola victims lie disused in a field near a closed Ebola treatment unit.

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Ebola Survivors 10
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Beds of Ebola victims lie disused in a field near a closed Ebola treatment unit.

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Ebola Survivors 11
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

An Ebola Treatment Unit (ETU) lies all but condemned on the outskirts of Monrovia.

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Ebola Survivors 12
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

All of this woman's family members died; only grand children remain. Now, her house is empty.

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Ebola Survivors 13
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

An Ebola survivor does the dishes outside her home in Monrovia. Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 14
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 02
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

After one week of throwing up, Bindu (23) went to a hospital in her district. She couldn't eat anything for a over 10 days. All her family members around her also caught the virus. She is the only one survivor and in her community people are afraid to speak to her in fear of getting the disease.

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Ebola Survivors 04
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

Helena Henry (30) and her brother the were first of her household to get Ebola from a younger cousin who was staying over. He died at the age of four-years-old, and soon after, more people in her family became ill.

"After calling for an ambulance for over 12 days, they finally showed up,” she said. “But in the meantime, my younger brother already died here in house."

She went to the ETU for treatment, but some people were afraid to go there, so they remained at home. After three weeks fighting for her life, she survived Ebola. Returning home, she found out that her husband, her sister and another brother, her aunt & uncle and their daughter and sister-in-law also caught the virus.

"None of them survived,” she said. “Now I live in a empty house, taking care of my two children, four children of my mother and one of my brother." She relies on food aid from World Food Program to get by. "When this aid stops, I don't know how I can feed 7 children."

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Ebola Survivors 06
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 07
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 03
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
25 Feb 2015

The father of Vivian Kekula (26) was working in a local clinic as a nurse. That's where he contracted Ebola. When he got sick in June, her family didn't think about Ebola at first. The ambulance brought him to an ETU, but in the process he spreaded the disease to Vivian's mother, sister and a cousin. And then to Vivian. People were suffering from internal bleedings. "This was hard to watch. I was crying because I was scared. But people that were treating me where encouraging me, that gave me strength". When she got out she heard that all family members somehow survived the disease. "That's when we celebrated". Now she has a six month contract working for Save the Children to talk to survivors and hear their stories to see what aftercare is needed.

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Ebola Survivors 03
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
24 Feb 2015

Health workers were afraid to accept Comfort at the local hospital when she needed to give birth. They thought she might be caught with Ebola, so they turned her away. Comfort faces at the spot where she gave birth, in the middle of the the street, to twins. In the rain.

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Burkina Faso Gold Mines 02
Yako
By Dennis & Patrick Weinert
24 Mar 2014

The women of the surrounding villages come by to collect the potable groundwater as the miners switch on the pump.