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Law Student Turned Taxi Driver Bears ...
Aleppo
By mittome
19 Jan 2015

In a telling interview, a young man who was a second-year law student during the outbreak of the Syrian Civil War explains why he joined the rebels after witnessing what he says were atrocities committed by the regime of President Bashar al-Assad in his hometown of Aleppo. Seeing the city's war-torn streets from his eyes, viewers get an unflinching insight into the daily comings and goings of an average Syrian whose life has been fundamentally transformed by the civil war.

Transcription:

Imad Haj Bakri, Taxi driver:
(Man, Arabic) (00:42-01:24)

I studied law at Aleppo University and was a second-year student. Then I volunteered in the police force. After the revolution started and I witnessed the conflicts and the oppression, I withdrew from the course and started participating in the demonstration. The regime caught me and imprisoned me and I was expelled from the university. That is why I came here, to work and make a living. During my work with the rebels, I was injured more than once.

Imad Haj Bakri, Taxi driver:
(Man, Arabic) (02:00-03:11) Conversation with a passenger:

Passenger: What happened here?

Driver: many missiles were dropped here and they caused destruction, this used to be a main highway, look what happened now.
Many people died, look where it was dropped, here on the concrete, look at the huge hole it created, almost 37 kills - a massacre. Look at the destruction, it is like this wherever you go. There is a school there that was also attacked. Poor children.

Passenger: a barrel bomb attacked it right?

Driver: yes

Passenger: May God never have mercy on Bashar.

Imad Haj Bakri, Taxi driver:
(Man, Arabic) (03:14-03:37)

I forgot about my studies, and this taxi is how I make a living, even though the fuel is very expensive, and the roads are destroyed. Life is a lot more expensive now, we do not know what to do. We are alway expecting a barrel bomb or a missile.

Imad Haj Bakri, Taxi driver
(Man, Arabic) (03:52-04:12)

The situation is much worse than before, fuel is expensive and roads are destroyed, everything is destroyed. I forgot about my studies to be able to provide for my family.

Imad Haj Bakri,Taxi driver:
(Man, Arabic) (04:23-04:29)

I am totally content and life has to go on.

Imad Haj Bakri, Taxi driver:
(Man, Arabic) (04:58-05:41)

When the FSA first entered Aleppo, it was the fourth of Ramadan, the first missile was dropped on al-Ansar al-Sharqi, the first missile to be dropped in Aleppo. So I went to watch, it was strange for us, so we went to watch, I was injured, I do not know exactly how, but I knew I'd been injured. It felt as if I was falling asleep, and I woke up in the university hospital, controlled by the regime, I was unconscious for about a week and lost sight in my right eye.

Imad Haj Bakri, Taxi driver:
(Man, Arabic) (06:23-07:39)

What happened is, it was the fourth of Ramadan, I was in my house which is on the opposite side of this area. We heard a massive noise and thought it was a missile. We rushed to rescue people, and it was strange, there were not many injuries, only one man that I can remember, and while a huge number of people were standing in the area, another missile was dropped on us. I fainted for a few seconds then woke up to see corpses and injured people everywhere, a scene you cannot imagine. I looked around and fainted again because of how horrifying the scene was. I woke up in the hospital and they told me that it was the thirteenth day of Ramada. I had been unconscious for a while and was injured in the eye and the head, and they had inserted tubes in my body.

Abdulrahman Haj Bakri, Imad's younger brother:
(Man, Arabic) (07:46-08:04)

My brother Imad is older than me. He was a university student, but the difficult situation forced him to work as a taxi driver. In spite of the fact that this profession is very dangerous, and there is constant shelling, and the regime is targeting the liberated areas, my brother keeps working.

Ahmed Orabi, Imad's friend
(Man, Arabic) (08:05-08:58)

Imad's case is not a special case, but we can make it special by shedding light on the fact that he is a university student and a lawyer and is now working as a taxi driver. Because of the difficult circumstances and the expensive cost of life, we are trying to do anything we can to support our family. He has a special case because he used to be a good law student and he had lots of ambition, but now he is a taxi driver, and that is how people see him, without knowing his background or the fact that he is a well educated person.

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Banned from Making a Living for Secur...
Sanaa
By TTM Mena Desk
27 Dec 2014

40 year old Mershid al-Merhibi makes a living by transporting people on his motorbike through the Yemeni capital, Sanaa.
For 7 years the taxi motorbike has been the only source of income for Mershid, his wife and 5 children.
Despite his BA degree in business he has not been able to find a job and has no choice but to work as a taxi biker because of the high rate of unemployment and the government’s failure to resuscitate the economy.

Like all other taxi bike drivers in Sanaa, Mershid makes up to five US dollars a-day, which is barely enough to make ends meet. However, this income is now in danger.
At the beginning of December, 2014, the Yemeni government passed a law banning motorbikes in the capital to try to prevent frequent assassinations and acid attacks carried out by unknown gunmen on motorbikes.

The government claims that motorbikes makes it easy for criminals to conduct attacks and then quickly escape.

The taxi bikers say banning motorbikes is not the answer because it is their only source of income, and so Mershid and many others continue to work on their motorbikes at high risk of being caught by the police, who Mershid says will probably destroy his bike.

Interviews:

Mershid al-Merhibi, Motorbike Driver (man, Arabic):
01:41
"I am Mershid al-Merhibi. I’m 40 years old and graduated from Sana’a University. I was forced to work with the motorcycle because there are no jobs and I am unemployed. You can see for yourself how the situation is here.”

02:18
“I wake up each morning and get on my bike and make my way to this intersection to wait for passengers to come. Sometimes, I carry one passenger and sometimes two. They come and we negotiate the price and then I take them to their destination.”

02:44
“Sometimes I find 3-4 passengers a-day. God does not disappoint, and I am thankful for that.”

03:24
“During the past two years, a lot of problems happened with motorcycles. A lot of assassinations occurred here in Sana’a as well as in other provinces . Because motorbikes are easy to get away with, these wicked people use them as a tool to carry out assassinations and acid attacks. They ride and throw acid then easily escape on their bike. This act has ruined work for motorbike drivers including me.”

03:58
“I am just looking for work but I could not find anything except working on my motorbike. They need to find us a solution”

Hussain al-Shadadi, Traffic Officer (man, Arabic):
04:05
“There are people who really need the motorbike to make money. They don’t have any other source of income except with their motorbike. However, because there are criminals who are causing problems and assassinating people, politicians, security and army personal with it, making a living on a motorbike has been banned”.

Mershid al-Merhibi, Motorbike Driver (man, Arabic):
05:18
“Sometimes the government sends police patrols to confiscate motorbikes, they take it from you by force. If you can get away from them and manage to transport one or two passengers a-day, this is good for you. However, I have seen them take a motorbike and cut it in half before my eyes.”

05:54
“The money I make in this job is often saved. Some of it is spent on rent, the kids and their school and to buy basic necessities for living. Even though the money is not enough, it still helps out. If they take away our motorbikes, then may god help us; where will we go and what we will do”.

06:25
“We ask Allah for a better, stronger nation that will not prohibit motorbikes so people can make a living”

Shot List:

Various shots of Mershid on his motorbike
Various shots of bikers
Surveillance camera video showing an acid attack on a man in the street
Various shots of Mershid and passenger on the bike

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Fighting for Human Rights in Lebanon
Beirut
By Cherine Yazbeck
10 Dec 2014

Beirut, Lebanon
December 9, 2014

The world will celebrate the International Day for Human Rights on December 10 this year while human rights in Lebanon are notoriously bad. Lebanon prides itself that Lebanese philosopher Charles Malik was the official rapporteur for the United Nation’s Commission on Human Rights in 1948, which drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
According to Lebanese psychoanalyst and human rights activist Reina Milad Sarkis, the government should create a ministry for human rights to put an end to abuses against women and other human rights violations.
Nisrine Rouhana, a Lebanese mother of two, was the victim of a gruesome murder.
Her husband is accused of abducting her and taking her to a remote area where he killed her and dumped her body in a forest.
According to Nisrine’s family, her husband had beaten her for 15 years and killed her when she took legal action against him.
Nisrine’s case fuelled a heated debate in Lebanon about the need for stricter laws to limit violence against women. In the past two years, Lebanese media shed the light on several similar cases in which married women are believed to be killed by their husbands following a history of domestic abuse.
Female migrant domestic workers in Lebanon are also widely abused and suffer circumstances that are akin to slavery.
Sarkis believes that there is need for a radical solution to end violence against women in Lebanon; the government should act on legal and cultural levels to change women’s dim reality and provide citizens and residents of Lebanon with basic rights.

Shot List

1 Wide of Reina Milad Sarkis entering room.
2 Close up of Reina Milad Sarkis’s face.
3 Various of Reina Milad Sarkis.

4 SOUNDBITE (French) Reina Milad Sarkis, psychoanalyst and human rights activist (Woman)

“Lebanon adheres to human rights values and the International Human Rights Charter -- Lebanon has participated in drafting and signing it. Lebanon would like to present itself to the region [Middle East] as a country that holds the values of tolerance and freedom; all the values that are included in the Human Rights Charter. “Human rights are about dignity of citizens and all residents in a given country – the right of movement, the freedom of belief, etc. “Being in a region like the Middle East, I believe that Lebanon is – in theory – a country that would like to carry certain values. “Unfortunately, since the 1950s – precisely in 1948 – circumstances did not allow reconciliation between what Lebanon pretends to be and what it really is. “Women are beaten every day. There are scandals in the news that are beyond imagination. Women are beaten by abusive husbands. There are women who die and their husbands, literally, [gets] away with murder. “Women are not protected as they should be. There are also scandals about foreign [domestic] workers], accusations of slavery. This cannot be tolerated. “Things are going from bad to worst, the situation is becoming worst. These values are disintegrating and there is a real change, which is very dangerous. “I think that the Lebanese government, which is notoriously absent from this issue, should fill its role and create a symbolic and efficient space to take care of human rights in this country – hence comes the idea of creating a human rights ministry. “We have victims and even with the presence of NGOs the situation [has not changed]. The biggest absent is the government. The situation is deteriorating and there is a really terrifying wave of violence, horror, and atrocity. “We are at a point where we should choose – either we give up and say there is nothing we could do and we let go any of hope, or we try –perhaps as a last attempt – to do something; there might me something that we could save. Human rights are not a luxury… it is not secondary. It is something extremely basic. It means having the right to eat when you are hungry; it is the right to go to school; and to receive treatment. “The government should give these basic things to its citizens so that they would be able to worry about other things. “When we reach the point where there is an extremism that presents itself as religious – a moralizing extremism that is very oppressive; when this phenomenon becomes the norm; when we are shocked when someone tries to do something for human rights, I think there is a real problem.

“There is a distortion of conception (…).There is a degeneration, an erosion that is taking place with time. There is a lack of a state of law. There are peculiar mentalities. “It is true that individual rights are complicated by religion and tradition, but it is not at all a question of Shiite –Sunni [divide]. “Nisrine is a woman who was abused during 20 years of married life, beaten every day, and ended up being killed by her husband. We still do not know if her husband will receive the punishment he deserves – probably not. It will not of the same proportion as of the crimes’. This woman was not protected; she could not resort to a law that could protect her. She is a Christian woman, married to a Christian, her kids are Christian and her family is Christian. “I think there is a real problem when it comes to laws. They need to be [reformed], more honest, a little less hypocrite, and a little more realistic. “I do not think that these problems are because of ISIS. There is an urgent need for reforms. “On the other hand, Lebanon has many good laws; laws that are humane but not applied because of mentalities that are changing for the worse. NGOs were able to push things a little, but they do not have any authority. They cannot draft and issue laws.”

5 Wide of women in the street.
6 SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Sally Rizk, Social worker from Caritas (Woman)
“What I notice the most is that wages [of foreign domestic workers] are not paid. Other cases include beating , physical harm and rape.” 7 SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Unnamed foreign domestic worker (Woman)
“I came to Lebanon two years ago. My boss was not good to me (…) she did not pay me or give me food. Whenever I asked for money to send it to Bangladesh, she used to beat me up and say that my work was not good, even though I worked hard. “They would let me to sleep only at 11 pm or midnight and then wake me up at 5 am or 4:30 am. They didn't give me anything. They didn't allow me to talk with another girl. They did not allow me to leave home.”

8 SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Sally Rizk, Social worker from Caritas (Woman)

“We receive girls [foreign domestic workers], calm them down and talk to them. We fill in a social file and then refer them to the legal department. We cooperate with General Security and courts if necessary. “As you saw, that girl was not paid. The General Security conducts an investigation with the sponsor. In some cases [the worker] gets her rights through the General Security or in other cases we have to resort to a lawyer to file a lawsuit.”

9 Wide of Syrian refugees in Lebanon protesting their treatment.
10 Wide of people playing sports in Beirut.
11 Wide of Ashura procession.
12 Wide of mosque in Beirut.

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Lawrence Repeta on Japan’s New Secrec...
Tokyo, Japan
By Michael Penn
03 Sep 2014

Up to ten years in prison for leakers? Up to five years in prison for investigative journalists? No protection for whistleblowers? No clear standards for prosecution? This is not some dark Orwellian fantasy, but rather a law that was passed by the Shinzo Abe administration in December 2013. The law is slated to come into effect in December of 2014. Professor Lawrence Repeta of Meiji University gives a lucid and revealing account of the Japanese government’s war against transparency and political accountability.

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Women-only carriages in Thailand
Bangkok
By Ana Salvá
31 Jul 2014

On August 1, 2014, the Thai government brought back train carriages for women and children under 10 years old. These carriages ceased to be operational in 2002 due to financial losses.

This move comes after the shocking rape and murder of Nong Kaem, a girl of 13 who was traveling on an overnight train to Bangkok on July 6. Since this incident hundreds of thousands of people are pressuring the government to take action and toughen penalties for sex offenders, calling for capital punishment.

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Sample media
Prostitutes in Brazil Demand More Rights
Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
By Giuseppe Bizzarri
16 Jun 2014
  • OUT ITALY, BRAZIL AND SWITZERLAND The Brazilian prostitutes frequently give presents to exu, the afro-Brazilian divinity, to have money, safeness and maybe love. Exu is the guardian of axe, the energy that moves anything in the life’s aspects, included the riots of the Niteroi’s prostitutes. The atmosphere is tense for the “garotas de programa”, the prostitutes working independently and not in brothels disguised as saunas and nightclubs in Brazil. In Niteroi, a tourist town on the shore of Guanabara Bay, just opposite the Rio de Janeiro’s side, the prostitutes have demonstrated repeatedly in the street against the PM (Military Police) action that have dislodged by force and illegally about two hundred prostitutes from the Caixa’s brothel, where the women live and work. Despite the “Garotas” rent their apartments, they are actually prevented from working in the famous brothel self-administrated in the Avenida Amaral Peixoto in the centre of Niteroi. Prostitution is not a crime in Brazil, it has been a legalized profession since 2000. Prostitution is legalized by the Brazilian state, but prostitution houses aren't. The houses might be illegal, but aren't unusual in Brazil. Most of them are full of corruption and sexual exploitation. Taking advantage of the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympic Games that will be hosted by Brazil, the federal deputy Jean Wyllys presented the Grabriela Leite project of law in Brasilia. A project that aims to regulate the prostitutes' profession and rights. - OUT ITALY, BRAZIL AND SWITZERLAND -
    http://giuseppebizzarri.com/
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Sample media
Abortion in Ireland
Dublin
By tobiasero
27 Dec 2013

Ireland is one of the last countries in which abortion is illegal in every form. This is a story about people living a moral issue that can make their life impossible.

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Mary & Salome: polygamy in Kenya (2 ...
Lamuru, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
14 Sep 2013

Currently, according to Kenyan law, polygamy is not recognized between the union of Christians and the second wife is not entitled to inheritance. The new Bill is trying to equalize all partners and ensure polygamy is recognized under customary law, which would legally protect all wives and prevent a man from marrying two women without prior consent.

However, Peter says the new Bill would not affect his household. “It can be very precarious for a man to marry two women. A man has to control the amount of love he has equally between both women, or they can become jealous and bitter. That is why I share everything and they are happy,” he says.

As seen above, both women have their own house just meters away from each other.

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Egypt’s HCC rules against Shura Counc...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
03 Jun 2013

Egypt’s High Constitutional Court ruled on Sunday, June 2, that the upper house of parliament ‘Shura Council’ and a panel that drafted the new constitution are invalid.

The Court ruled that the law governing the election of independent members of the Islamist-dominated Shura Council, currently holding legislative powers, was illegal.

As a result of the ruling, the Shura Council will be dissolved but the ruling also said that it would not be dissolved until a new House of Representatives, lower house of parliament, is elected.

Both the upper and lower houses were elected under the same electoral law, which the HCC last year deemed invalid, prompting the dissolution of parliament.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Wael Hamdy Al-Saeed, lawyer, filed complaint against the Shura Council:
“The two articles 2 and 8 that governed the election of the Shura Council of law 120, for 1980 and its amendments were the same two articles regulated the elections of the lower house of the parliament which the Constitutional Court ruled on 2012 their unconstitutionality, hence, since this time the Shura Council also was illegal.”

The court also ruled the unconstitutionality of a Law, popularly known as the emergency law. While the law is currently not in effect, the two complaints against it claimed it could be used at any time by authorities to impose a state of emergency.

For his part, Essam El-Erian, vice-chairman of the Freedom and Justice Party (FJP), said that the Shura Council is currently the only legislative authority and it would continue its duty until the elections of a new parliament.

Muslim Brotherhood lawyer said that the decision to postpone the dissolution was based upon article 230 of the new constitution.

Other Freedom and Justice Party figure said that the Shura Council should approve a new law governs the election of independent MPs to Shura Council before holding a new House of Representatives.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - Mahmoud Abou Elenin, Muslim Brotherhood lawyer:
“The fourth item of the verdict postponed the dissolution of the Shura Council until the elections of a new House of Representatives and it is based upon article 230 of the new constitution. The Constitutional Court didn’t base on its decision to postpone the implementation of the verdict on the law of the Constitutional Court but based on the constitution, hence it admits that this constitution is existed.”

The court also ruled the law governing the composition of the Constituent Assembly, the body tasked with drafting Egypt's new constitution, is unconstitutional.

It was not immediately clear whether the ruling on the 100-member constitutional panel would cancel the charter it drafted. The constitution was adopted in a nationwide vote in December. President Mohamed Morsi declared the Constituent Assembly immune from dissolution in a controversial constitutional declaration last November.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: June 2, 2013 + (Archive footage)
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: June 2, 2013
Length: 00:02:12
Video Size: 108 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Various shots of the Egypt’s High Constitutional Court
  2. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Wael Hamdy Al-Saeed, lawyer, filed complaint against the Shura Council:
    “The two articles 2 and 8 that governed the election of the Shura Council of law 120, for 1980 and its amendments were the same two articles regulated the elections of the lower house of the parliament which the Constitutional Court ruled on 2012 their unconstitutionality, hence, since this time the Shura Council also was illegal.”
  3. Various external shots of the Shura Council
  4. Various shots of one of the sessions of the Shura Council
  5. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - Mahmoud Abou Elenin, Muslim Brotherhood lawyer:
    “The fourth item of the verdict postponed the dissolution of the Shura Council until the elections of a new House of Representatives and it is based upon article 230 of the new constitution. The Constitutional Court didn’t base on its decision to postpone the implementation of the verdict on the law of the Constitutional Court but based on the constitution, hence it admits that this constitution is existed.”
  6. Various shots of the ceremony where President Mohamed Morsi received the new constitution from head of the Constituent Assembly
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Pacification - Rio Favelas in Brazil
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
By Rafael Fabres
26 May 2013

While preparing for the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics, Rio de Janeiro has been implementing an innovative safety program called “UPP,” Police Pacification Unit.
UPPs are permanent police posts installed in the “favelas,” the sprawling shantytowns that house hundreds of thousands of the city residents.
Their mission is to maintain control of favela territory once the local drug trade has been expelled.
While many believe the UPPs have helped to quell the violence and bring prosperity to the favelas, others see the Pacification program as a temporary cover-up to Rio’s problems with social disparity.

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FATA Lawyers Press for Reform ( 7 of 7)
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
27 Apr 2013

April 27, 2013 -Peshawar, Pakistan.
The Chief Justice of the Peshawar High Court, Justice Dost Muhammad Khan, and other guests attend a forum organized by FATA lawyers pressing for reforms in the troubled tribal areas of Pakistan

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FATA Lawyers Press for Reform ( 6 of...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
27 Apr 2013

April 27, 2013 -Peshawar, Pakistan.
The Chief Justice of the Peshawar High Court, Justice Dost Muhammad Khan, and other guests attend a forum organized by FATA lawyers pressing for reforms in the troubled tribal areas of Pakistan

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FATA Lawyers Press for Reform ( 5 of...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
27 Apr 2013

April 27, 2013 -Peshawar, Pakistan.
The Chief Justice of the Peshawar High Court, Justice Dost Muhammad Khan, and other guests attend a forum organized by FATA lawyers pressing for reforms in the troubled tribal areas of Pakistan. Chief Justice Khan and senior lawyer Mr. Latif Afridi rise for the national anthem.

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FATA Lawyers Press for Reform ( 4 of...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
27 Apr 2013

April 27, 2013 -Peshawar, Pakistan.
The Chief Justice of the Peshawar High Court, Justice Dost Muhammad Khan, and other guests attend a forum organized by FATA lawyers pressing for reforms in the troubled tribal areas of Pakistan.

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FATA Lawyers Press for Reform ( 3 of...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
27 Apr 2013

April 27, 2013 -Peshawar, Pakistan.
The Chief Justice of the Peshawar High Court, Justice Dost Muhammad Khan, and other guests attend a forum organized by FATA lawyers pressing for reforms in the troubled tribal areas of Pakistan.

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FATA Lawyers Press for Reform ( 2 of...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
26 Apr 2013

April 27, 2013 - Peshawar, Pakistan. The Chief Justice of the Peshawar High Court, Justice Dost Muhammad Khan, and other guests attend a forum organized by FATA lawyers pressing for reforms in the troubled tribal areas of Pakistan.

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FATA Lawyers Press for Reform ( 1 of...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
26 Apr 2013

April 27, 2013 - Peshawar, Pakistan. The Chief Justice of the Peshawar High Court, Justice Dost Muhammad Khan, and other guests attend a forum organized by FATA lawyers pressing for reforms in the troubled tribal areas of Pakistan.

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Kenyan Civil Society Members Move To ...
Nairobi, Kenya
By evans
09 Mar 2013

Members of the public leave Milimani Law Courts in Nairobi after the ruling of a case filed by AfriCOG organization to block the tallying of votes whereby it was rejected. ICC Suspect Uhuru Kenyatta was leading followed by the Jubilee presidential candidate Raila Odinga as Kenyans waited to hear the results of the new president.

PHOTO:PETER OBUYA

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Kenyan Civil Society Members Move To ...
Nairobi, Kenya
By evans
08 Mar 2013

A Court in Nairobi is seated to hear a case that was filed by AfriCOG organization to block the tallying of votes whereby it was rejected. ICC Suspect Uhuru Kenyatta was leading the election, followed by the Jubilee presidential candidate Raila Odinga as Kenyans wait to know the results for the new president.

PHOTO:PETER OBUYA

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Kenyan Civil Society Members Move To ...
Nairobi, Kenya
By evans
08 Mar 2013

Judges David Majanja(left),Isaack Lenaola(centre) and Weldon Korir at Milimani Law Courts in Nairobi during the ruling of a case filed by AfriCOG organization to block the tallying of votes whereby it was rejected. ICC Suspect Uhuru Kenyatta was leading the election, followed by the Jubilee presidential candidate Raila Odinga as Kenyans waited to know the results of the new president.

PHOTO:PETER OBUYA

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Kenyan Civil Society Members Move To ...
Nairobi, Kenya
By evans
08 Mar 2013

Lawyers at Milimani Law Court during the rulling of a case that was filed by AfriCOG organization to block the tallying of votes whereby it was rejected. ICC Suspect Uhuru Kenyatta was leading the election followed by the Jubilee presidential candidate Raila Odinga as Kenyans waited to hear the results of the new president.

PHOTO:PETER OBUYA

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Authority for the Promotion of Virtue
Aleppo, Syria
By salem_rizk
26 Feb 2013

At times appearing beneath a banner with the name "The Islamic Front for the Liberation of Syria," a man referred to as Abu Sulayman introduces "The Committee for the Protection of Virtue and Defense of the Oppressed." The name of this committee is similar to that of the police that enforce Sharia Law in Saudi Arabia, called, "The Committee for the Protection of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice." In his statement, Mr. Sulayman describes the provision of aid and the provision of security and policing as two core aspects of the committee's mission. Following his statement are a series of brief interviews, including people seeking assistance from the committee as well as a member of the committee apparently interacting with one of their detainees in a temporary holding cell.

Partial transcription below. Full transcription, including time code, is available on request.

[Transcript from the video statement]: We are members of the Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and Defense of the Oppressed. We work primarily on security and policing. Our security arm operates throughout all of the liberated areas. As everyone knows, many violations and crimes have occurred and are occurring at the hands of both civilians and the Free Syrian Army (FSA).

God willing, we will now be able to provide security by utilizing our committee's Islamic civilian police force so that we might stand against all criminals and violators who would damage public or private property. As far as our security and policing operations in the liberated areas, we go on patrols, set up checkpoints and send committee forces to provide the security and curb theft and other transgressions.

We always seek peaceful solutions, especially when it involves any armed groups (FSA members), by sending respected religious authorities to resolve conflicts in a peaceful manner. If this approach does not succeed, then we use force to arrest the offending party, whether it is an individual or a group. The offender is then brought to our Sharia Law Committee.

As mentioned, our work in this committee is multi-faceted, and includes providing assistance to those in need. The aid side is a very important aspect of our work.

[Excerpts from the interviews]:


[A civilian woman]: I have come here because my children are hungry and I am hungry, and we have been for the past 3 months; and for 3 months they have been promising assistance, and I haven't seen anything. My cousin came here asking for a house and they haven't provided her with one.

[Mr. Sulayman, speaking to one of the religious authorities, apparently also on the committee]: "To avoid the temptation that a woman living alone can introduce in the community, we need to provide this woman with a home."

[Mr. Sulayman, speaking to the same woman, who has approached the committee for housing assistance]: "Take care of your home (don't break sharia law), be a good muslim, keep your children with you, and we will provide you with a house."

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Children On Death Row In Yemen (1 of 8)
Sana'a, Yemen
By dustweare
06 Feb 2013

A multi-media essay (with photos, video and text) about child prisoners that are awaiting execution in Yemen. Only five countries - Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and Yemen - continue the execution of minors in violation of international law, which “prohibits, without exception, the execution of individuals for crimes committed before they turn eighteen.” The United States was included on that list until 2005 when the Supreme Court finally outlawed the death penalty for minors under eighteen. There are currently 77 juvenile inmates in Sanaa's Central Prison. 35 of them are at high risk of being executed.

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Hundreds of Muslim Brotherhood gather...
Cairo, Egypt
By Ahmed Medhat
23 Nov 2012

Hundreds of Muslim Brotherhood gathered in front of the High Court in support of the constitutional declaration of President Mohamed Moursy and which included the decision to sack the Attorney General and the retrial of the symbols of the former regime and fortify the founding committee and the Shura Council

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Father of Palestinian Man Killed by L...
Beirut, Lebanon
By U.S. Editor
23 Oct 2012

Hundreds of mourners attended on Tuesday, October 23, the funeral procession a young Palestinian man who was killed on Monday by Lebanese army troops in Beirut’s Qasqas area.

Mourners chanted slogans and fired in the air during the funeral procession.

The young man, Ahmad Qouwayder, was buried in the Sabra refugee camp near Qasqas neighborhood.

The father of the late young man demands retaliation for his son, calling on the Lebanese President to get him the right of his son from those who killed him.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Father of the young Palestinian man killed by the Lebanese Army:
“I want retaliation for the blood of my son from the army, and I am a follower of the law not above the law. I say to the President and the whole world that I want to avenge the blood of my son. I want retaliation no matter how; whether through the law or without the law, I want it.”

According to a statement released by the military, an army soldier killed a young Palestinian man after the man and his brother opened fire on an army patrol near Beirut’s Qasqas area.

The incident comes amid heightened tension in Lebanon following the assassination of Lebanese intelligence chief Wissam al-Hassan who was killed on Friday in a massive car explosion that rocked the Beirut area of Ashrafyeh, leaving seven others dead and over a hundred wounded.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 23, 2012
Shooting Location: Beirut, Lebanon
Publishing Time: October 23, 2012
Length: 0:0:57
Video Size: 47.0 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

1- Various shots of the dead body during the process of washing and shrouding
2- Tilt up shot of the father of the young man killed by the Lebanese Army troops
3- Various shots of mourners waiting for the funeral
4- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Father of the young Palestinian man killed by the Lebanese Army:
“I want retaliation for the blood of my son from the army, and I am a follower of the law not above the law. I say to the President and the whole world that I want to avenge the blood of my son. I want retaliation no matter how; whether through the law or without the law, I want it.” 5- Various shots of mourners carrying the coffin of the man during the funeral, shouting “There is no God but Allah”
6- Various shots of mourners during the funeral, shouting “Allah is the greatest” while gunfire is heard in the background
7- Wide shot of men shooing fire during the funeral

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MALAYSIAN COURT DISMISSES BID TO LEGA...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
By Beirut Editor's Picks
12 Oct 2012

The Malaysian High Court dismissed an application today by four transgender individuals who are challenging the ban on Muslim men dressing and posing as women, which is found under Section 66 of the Syariah Criminal Enactment.

The four, who had been either arrested or penalized by the "Negeri Sembilan Islamic Religious Department" before, were applying for a judicial review to declare Section 66 unconstitutional.

Justice Siti Mariah Ahmad said in her judgment that the four applicants were indisputably Muslims and were biologically born as a man, so Section 66 applied to them. She also ruled that Part 2 of the Federal Constitution, which guarantees fundamental liberties to an individual, is overruled by Section 66.

Aston Paiva, the lawyer representing the four during the judicial review, said he would be advising his clients to appeal the decision.

The four applicants, Adam Shazrul Mohammad Yusoff, Mohammad Juzaili Mohammad Khamis, Shukur Jani and Wan Fairol Wan Ismail, argued that Section 66 violated the Federal Constitution's guarantee of freedom of expression. They also claimed that the "Syariah laws" should not apply to them as they had been diagnosed with "Gender Identity Disorder."

While several other Malaysians who were born male have sought to be legally declared women, this was the first legal challenge to the law that bans men from "cross-dressing" in Malaysia.

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Malaysian Court Rejects Challenge to ...
kuala lumpur, Malaysia
By Khairil safwan
10 Oct 2012

Aston Paiva, the lawyer representing the four transgender people gives a speech to the media in Seremban, Negeri Sembilan outside Kuala Lumpur on 11th october 2012. The appeal of the four transgender people challenging the Sharia' Law that bans men from dressing as women has been rejected by Secular Court. Sharia', or Islamic Law, bans Muslim men from dressing or posing as women.

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Malaysian Court Rejects Challenge to ...
kuala lumpur, malaysia
By Khairil safwan
10 Oct 2012

Aston Paiva, the lawyer representing the four transgender people gives a speech to the media in Seremban, Negeri Sembilan outside Kuala Lumpur on 11th october 2012. The appeal of the four transgender people challenging the Sharia' Law that bans men from dressing as women has been rejected by Secular Court. Sharia', or Islamic Law, bans Muslim men from dressing or posing as women.

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Transgender challenging the law in th...
kuala lumpur, Malaysia
By Khairil safwan
10 Oct 2012

Aston Paiva, the lawyer representing the four transgender people gives a speech to the media in Seremban, Negeri Sembilan outside Kuala Lumpur on 11th october 2012. The appeal of the four transgender people challenging the Sharia' Law that bans men from dressing as women has been rejected by Secular Court. Sharia', or Islamic Law, bans Muslim men from dressing or posing as women.

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What Have You Accomplished?
Amman, Jordan
By Melissa Tabeek
21 Sep 2012

A demonstrator holds a sign mocking Jordan's Prime Minister Fayez al-Tarawneh: "Tarawneh: Raises prices. One Vote. Arrests. Media law."

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Editor's Picks for 8 September 2012
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
07 Sep 2012

Egypt Air aircrew suspended their strike, which started early on Friday, September 7, in a bid to have better working conditions including better insurance and an increase in staff numbers; the strike forced the company to suspend international flights for more than 12 hours.

Although a smoking ban in all closed public spaces went into force in Lebanon under new legislation that promises hefty fines for lawbreakers, some people still sit in cafes, smoking water pipes and cigarettes.

Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsi met on Thursday, September 6, with Qatar Premier and Foreign Minister Sheikh Hamad Bin Jassim at the Presidential Palace headquarters in Cairo, where they held talks over the bilateral relations between the two countries and methods of increasing Qatari investments in Egypt.

A number of assailants attacked the Egyptian Football Association (EFA) on Wednesday, September 5, storming it with flammables and stones, causing damage to the building and terrifying its employees.

Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsi met on Thursday, September 6, with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, where they discussed the latest regional developments as well as various Palestinian issues.

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YEMENI CHILDREN IN PRISON
Sana'a, Yemen
By Mais Istanbuli
04 Sep 2012

An exclusive report on child prisoners that are awaiting execution in Yemen. Only five countries - Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and Yemen - continue the execution of minors void of international law which “prohibits, without exception, the execution of individuals for crimes committed before they turn eighteen.”

The story evolves around now eighteen years-old Nadim al-Azaazi arrested three years ago on murder charges. The teenager endured beatings and interrogation at his local prison station before transferring to the child prison in Sanaa.

Having gained access to the prison the reporters reveal seventy-seven minors, aged between fifteen to eighteen years-of-age, thirty-five of which face execution. The sentencing of Nadim has been delayed after the inmates went on hunger strike in solidarity with Nadim’s pending death penalty.

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Commissioners Delay Reviewing Court D...
Egypt, Cairo
By Marta Bogdanska
03 Sep 2012

The Commissioners assigned to review the Supreme Constitutional Court decision of parliament dissolution adjourned on Sunday, September 2, reviewing the decision to October 12.
The Constitutional Court ruled mid June the unconstitutionality of Egypt’s first post-revolution parliament, and the ruling Military Council then carried out the court ruling.
Two lawyers filed lawsuits against the court order and demanded return of the dissolved parliament, arguing that the Constitutional Court does not have the right to dissolve the parliament and that it is only assigned with ruling the constitutionality of laws and referring any other cases to the concerned courts.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohamed al-Omda, lawyer, member of the Constitutional and Legislative Affairs Committee of the dissolved parliament:
“The Constitutional Court bypassed its duties when it ruled the parliament dissolution, although the parliament wasn’t represented in the lawsuit. So, the court made many violations, which are all stated and the lawsuit was adjourned to be reviewed, as it is an urgent lawsuit and related to the country’s legislative authority.”

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mahmoud Abdo Ammar, lawyer, representing claimant against Shura Council dissolution:
“The Constitutional Court overrode its authorities, because since it was established, it never issued a ruling and carried it out at the same time. It is only assigned to judge whether a law wording is constitutional or not, and refer relevant lawsuits to concerned courts.”

President Mohamed Morsi issued a decree on July 8 ordering reinstatement of the dissolved parliament, but two days later the Constitutional Court issued a ruling suspending Morsi’s decree.
The dissolved parliament was Egypt’s first post-revolution parliament and it was dominated by Islamists, particularly the Muslim Brotherhood group.
Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: September 2, 2012 (and archive)
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: September 2, 2012
Length: 0:01:49
Video Size: 89.6 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS
SHOTLIST:
1- Wide overview of Cairo and the River Nile
2- Wide shot, traffic at a street in Cairo
3- Various external shots of Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court headquarters in Cairo
4- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohamed al-Omda, lawyer, member of the Constitutional and Legislative Affairs Committee of the dissolved parliament:
“The Constitutional Court bypassed its duties when it ruled the parliament dissolution, although the parliament wasn’t represented in the lawsuit. So, the court made many violations, which are all stated and the lawsuit was adjourned to be reviewed, as it is an urgent lawsuit and related to the country’s legislative authority.” 5- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mahmoud Abdo Ammar, lawyer, representing claimant against Shura Council dissolution:
“The Constitutional Court overrode its authorities, because since it was established, it never issued a ruling and carried it out at the same time. It is only assigned to judge whether a law wording is constitutional or not, and refer relevant lawsuits to concerned courts.” 6- Wide external shot of the lower house of parliament (the People’s Assembly) headquarters in Cairo
7- Various shots of a parliament session (archive)
8- Various external shots of the upper house of parliament (the Shura Council) headquarters in Cairo
9- Various shots of a Shura Council session (archive)

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New Edict Threatens Progress for Afgh...
Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
19 Apr 2012

Storyline: One of the most significant achievements of the new era in Afghanistan, after the fall of the Taliban, is in new freedoms for Afghan women. They are allowed to work in public, go to school, and participate in the political sphere-- something they were not allowed to do under the Taliban. However, the Afghan Religious Council, composed of hard-line religious leaders, has recently issued a new edict that calls women second-class citizens and prohibits them from traveling without the escort of a Mahram [male family member]. The edict was endorsed by the president, and has the potential of becoming law. Many people believe the Afghan government aims to woo the Taliban into peace talks by crafting and endorsing such a controversial mandate. The law has faced widespread resentment by Afghan women activists and Afghanistan’s civil society, putting pressure on the religious council and Ulema to revoke their edict.

Yalda Samih is young girl, her family lives in Kandahar province but Yalda lives in Kabul because she studies at the American University of Afghanistan.
Soundbite-1 Translation: Yalda Samih Student living in dorm: "it's very difficult for a girl to refrain from traveling unless she has a male chaperon, because not everyone has many brothers, or a father to accompany her everywhere. if it happens (the edict becomes a law), then we will face a lot of difficulties."
According to women activists in Kabul this is an unrealistic and unenforceable law for the citizens of Afghanistan.

Arezo Omid is a young woman activist who works with Young Women for Change, an organization of young women activists who advocate for women's rights. She says the law is unrealistic, and cannot be imposed on women in Afghanistan.
Soundbite-2 Translation: Arezo Omid (1:00-1:17): "I was very disappointed about this edict of Ulema council, because we are not rich people to have a male company accompany us during our trips outside the country. it's very difficult for those people who don't have a Mahram."

Soundbite-3 Translation: Yalda Samih (1:17-1:32): "if this edict becomes a law, I have to leave university. because I don't have anyone to come with me and live in the dorm. my father is responsible for the rest of the family, and I have a younger brother, who is studying school in Kandahar. So I would have to leave university.

Enayatullah Baligh a member of Islamic Ulema Council rejects Yalda's claim about the edict.
Soundbite-4 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh Member of Islamic Ulema councils: "Find a husband. find yourself a Mahram (male chaperon), these are all childish words."

Sounbite-5 Translation: Yalda samih (1:42-1:55): "I think it is impossible, because around 1.5 million widows live in Afghanistan. this edict also questions women's freedom. those who want to study can't get married and study. it is impossible."

Sounbite-6 Translation: Arezo Omid (1:56-2:05): "I personally think the government wants to get Taliban closer. If the Taliban come back to power, we will do the same thing we did last time and leave the country for the Taliban and immigrate to other countries"

Soundbite-7 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (2:07-2:14): "When they say, 'we got closer to the Taliban because we are scared of the Taliban,' it's totally wrong. We are not scared of the Taliban, it is the issue of religion."

Sounbite-8 Translation: Arezo Omid (2:15-2:21): "the problem is that high ranking government officials support these edicts."

Sounbite-9 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (2:23-2:44): "This edict does not need to be passed, it's a matter of religion. It is higher than the Constitution of Afghanistan, because the Afghanistan constitution states that no law is above the Islamic law. They must not ignore our edict, if they do, the Ulema Council will take action".

Soundbite-10 Translation: Soraya Kabul resident: "As an Afghan girl, I do not accept this edict, because Afghan men and women had, and must have, equal rights. And women make half of the society."

Soundbite-11 Translation: Sana Kabul resident: "I do not accept this edict, because it states that every woman should be accompanied by a man, and I would like to say that President Karzai's wife is a doctor and Mr. president can't be with his wife everywhere. So I don't accept this edict and will not obey it."

Soundbite-12 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (3:43-4:23): Afghan women are Muslims, so they can never oppose this edict. If they oppose this edict that means they have rejected the religion. If a minister is traveling he takes a body guard with him, so why can't our sisters take someone like their brother, uncle or nephew with them? These women do not understand. It's for their good. If there are widows, the government is responsible to pay for their food, and the government is responsible to pay for the person to travel with her as well. It's all for the good of the women. I don't understand how it is NOT observing women's rights.

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Disqualified Presidential Candidates ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
16 Apr 2012

Cairo, Egypt | April 16, 2012

On the last day to appeal the disqualification decision of Egypt's Supreme Presidential Election Commission (SPEC), three of the ten disqualified candidates and their representatives paid a visit to the commission on Monday, April 16, to appeal the decision with hopes to rejoin the presidential race.
Liberal candidate Ayman Nour, the main opponent of former president Hosni Mubarak in the 2005 elections, said the SPEC decision to disqualify him, which was based on fraud charges handed down during the rule of the former regime, was "incorrect,” and that he submitted a memo to be discussed with the commission Tuesday.
Nour was banned from politics in 2005 after being imprisoned for charges of fraud by the Mubarak regime. Egyptian law bans candidates with criminal records from running for political office.
However, the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Force (SCAF) gave Nour an official pardon late March. Due to his full pardon, Nour believes he is legally eligible to compete as a viable presidential candidate.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ayman Nour, disqualified liberal presidential candidate and Al-Ghad Party leader:
"It's not important who will be president and who will be vice president. The most important thing is that Egypt passes through this difficult moment. We appeal but we will not block the path of democratic process. We appeal and say that this is our right, as we have been oppressed seven years ago (in 2005 elections) and we're being oppressed until this moment. But this is OK for the sake of Egypt." Former vice-president Omar Suleiman's presidential campaign and office manager said little to reporters about Suleiman's chances to rejoin the race.
On the other hand, the attorney for the Muslim Brotherhood reaffirmed its certainty about the sound legal grounds of the group's candidate Khairat al-Shater, who was also disqualified due to a criminal record during Mubarak's presidency.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Colonel Hussein Sherif, Omar Suleiman's presidential campaign and office manager:
"I have no reply. The answer is with the commission.”

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Abdel Moneim Abdel Maqsoud, Muslim Brotherhood attorney:
"There has been a pardon for the original punishment and the subsequent penalties, including all criminal affects based on that ruling. Accordingly, the pardon terminates all legal hindrances preventing Eng. Khairat al-Shater from practicing his political rights." It is the last day for the ten candidates to appeal the disqualification decision announced Saturday.
Analysts say Suleiman's chances to rejoin the race after completing some papers are high, while Al-Shater, Nour and Salafi sheikh Hazem Salah Abu Ismail are not likely to rejoin.
Egypt's historical presidential elections will be held May 23 and 24.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: April 16, 2012 [and archive]
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: April 16, 2012
Length: 0:02:08
Video Size: 106 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS
SHOTLIST: (Archive)
1- Various external shots of the headquarters of Supreme Presidential Election Commission (SPEC) in Cairo
2- Various shots of security and army men guarding the headquarters of Supreme Presidential Election Commission (SPEC) in Cairo
3- Medium shot, disqualified liberal presidential candidate Ayman Nour, who was Mubarak's main opponent in 2005 elections, speaking to reporters outside the SPEC headquarters
4- Various shots of police and army presence outside the commission headquarters
5- Various shots of Nour entering the SPEC headquarters to appeal and speaking to reporters afterwards
6- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ayman Nour, disqualified liberal presidential candidate and Al-Ghad Party leader:
"It's not important who will be president and who will be vice president. The most important thing is that Egypt passes through this difficult moment. We appeal but we will not block the path of democratic process. We appeal and say that this is our right, as we have been oppressed seven years ago (in 2005 elections) and we're being oppressed until this moment. But this is OK for the sake of Egypt." 7- Various shots of police and army presence outside the commission headquarters [archive, April 2012]
8- Various shots of Omar Suleiman, former vice president and former intelligence chief, getting out of a car and heading to enter the commission headquarters amid crowds of security men and supporters [archive, April 2012]
9- Various shots of Suleiman getting into a car amid crowds of security men and supporters [archive, April 2012]
10- Wide shot, a large poster of Muslim Brotherhood's Khairat Al-Shater at the sidewalk [archive, April 2012]
11- Medium shot of Al-Shater trying to enter the commission headquarters amid throngs of supporters [archive, April 2012]
12- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Colonel Hussein Sherif, Omar Suleiman's presidential campaign and office manager:
"I have no reply. The answer is with the commission. 13- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Abdel Moneim Abdel Maqsoud, Muslim Brotherhood attorney:
"There has been a pardon for the original punishment and the subsequent penalties, including all criminal effects based on that ruling. Accordingly, the pardon terminates all legal hindrances preventing Eng. Khairat al-Shater from practicing his political rights." 14- Various shots of army soldiers with an armored vehicle and shields guarding the SPEC headquarters
15- Wide external shot of the SPEC headquarters and security cordon outside

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Egyptian Court Suspends Islamist-Domi...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
10 Apr 2012

Cairo, Egypt | April 10, 2012

Cairo Administrative Court suspended on Tuesday, April 10, the newly formed 100-member constitution-writing panel tasked with drafting Egypt’s new constitution after several lawsuits were filed demanding that the court dissolve the panel for not providing fair representation for all Egyptian citizens.

Protestors, including political activists and parliamentarians, gathered outside of the State Council headquarters, where the Administrative Court is held, raising signs and shouting statements against the Islamist-led constitution-writing committee formed by the parliament.

The protestors regarded the ruling as a victory for liberal and anti-Islamist calls demanding panel invalidation.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Political activist Karima al-Hifnawi:
"Suspending and invalidating the constitution-writing committee means by virtue of the ruling that it is invalid. The case is referred to the Constitutional Court and cannot be appealed. The immediate part of the ruling nullifies the panel formation. They (the Islamists) should return to reason and the right thing and the panel should represent all Egyptians, not only one faction."

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Parliament Member Gamal Zahran:
"In my opinion, this ruling is victory to the voice of reason, the voice of civil currents, the voice of civil state and the voice of all the people. It is a historical verdict that suspends a committee formed by the majority who insisted in ignoring a part of society, if not most of it, by forming a panel with majority members of Islamic trends."

The Court did not give the reasons for the ruling to suspend the panel, stating only that it halted the implementation of the decision of the parliament speaker to form it, referring the question of its legitimacy to a legal adviser.

Those who oppose the panel formation, mostly liberals and secularists, complain that the panel is dominated only by one group, namely Islamists representing the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafists, and that women and minorities are not represented in the panel.

The protestors shouted, “Down with the Military rule” and “Freedom”, referring to an alleged deal between the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF), and the Brotherhood.

The ruling adds another challenge facing the constitution-writing panel, after withdrawal of many of its members for its lack of fair representation according to them.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: April 10, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: April 10, 2012
Length: 0:01:53
Video Size: 93.3 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Various external shots of the State Council in Cairo, where the Administrative Court session is held
2- Various shots of protestors outside the State Council, raising signs reading and Egyptian flags
3- Medium shot of a large banner reading “let’s write our constitution with our hands”
4- Various shots of protestors shouting “Down with military rule…
Freedom, Freedom”
5- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Political activist Karima al-Hifnawi:
"Suspending and invalidating the constitution-writing committee means by virtue of the ruling that it is invalid. The case is referred to the Constitutional Court and cannot be appealed. The immediate part of the ruling nullifies the panel formation. They (the Islamists) should return to reason and the right thing and the panel should represent all Egyptians, not only one faction."
6- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Parliament Member Gamal Zahran:
"In my opinion, this ruling is victory to the voice of reason, the voice of civil currents, the voice of civil state and the voice of all the people. It is a historical verdict that suspends a committee formed by the majority who insisted in ignoring a part of society, if not most of it, by forming a panel with majority members of Islamic trends."
7- Various shots of protestors shouting statements condemning the constitution panel
8- Pan right shot of a banner reading “Constitution for all the Egyptians”
9- Various shots of protestors shouting against the constitution panel, saying “Illegitimate”
10- Various shots of protestors shouting statements against the panel, raising signs condemning the panel and the Muslim Brotherhood

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Pelosi: US-Egypt Ties Strong Despite ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
16 Mar 2012

Cairo, Egypt | March 15, 2012

US Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi said on Thursday, March 15, in a press conference in Cairo, that the relations between the United States and Egypt would remain strong despite the controversial NGO issue which she described as "a bump in the road" of the strong ties between the two countries.
SOUNDBITE 1 (English) - US congressional minority leader Nancy Pelosi:
"Whatever the NGO issue was, it should not be a barrier to the future possibilities between our two countries. The Egyptian people, if they want to have cooperation from the United States in their interest and we want to help them in our interest, let us proceed with the greatest respect and not let bump on the road, which you have with many countries, be an obstacle to that."

Pelosi commended Egypt’s recent elections of the two houses of the parliament as the first step towards democracy, reaffirming that the stability of Egypt serves the US interests in the region.
She also lowered the tone of Washington's threat to cut off financial aid to Egypt, saying that the United States would be there for Egypt provided the Egyptians were aware of the friendship between the two countries.
SOUNDBITE 2 (English) - US congressional minority leader Nancy Pelosi:
"The United States is well served by a strong and stable Egypt, to the extent that that assistance is in further ends of that stability, we'll certainly be there. However, we want to be there in a way that is directly beneficial to the Egyptian people and that they are aware of our friendship."

SHOTLIST:
1. Various shots of the press conference of US congresswoman Nancy Pelosi and her delegation in Cairo
2. Various shots of reporters asking questions and Pelosi speaking in reply
3. Medium shot, Pelosi speaking during the press conference
4. Long shot, a reporter asking and Pelosi listening
5. SOUNDBITE 1 (English) - US congressional minority leader Nancy Pelosi:
"Whatever the NGO issue was, it should not be a barrier to the future possibilities between our two countries. The Egyptian people, if they want to have cooperation from the United States in their interest and we want to help them in our interest, let us proceed with the greatest respect and not let bump on the road, which you have with many countries, be an obstacle to that." 6. Various shots of the press conference
7. SOUNDBITE 2 (English) - US congressional minority leader Nancy Pelosi:
"The United States is well served by a strong and stable Egypt, to the extent that that assistance is in further ends of that stability, we'll certainly be there. However, we want to be there in a way that is directly beneficial to the Egyptian people and that they are aware of our friendship." 8. Various shots of the press conference
9. Zoom out/pan right, Pelosi concluding the press conference and all leaving