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Ekas: bay of men 14
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
05 Mar 2016

A man and the female family members harvest green peanuts, one of Lombok's crops, that are grown along the southern tip of Ekas.

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Ekas: bay of men 07
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
02 Mar 2016

Salman, a fisherman and the best surfer in the village of Ekas, sands his fishing boat that has been freshly pained with Sasak designs. Other men of the village work on a boat and mend nets close to the shore of the bay.

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Ekas: bay of men 09
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
02 Mar 2016

During the day, women take care of the children while tending to other household chores. This boy will surely grow up to be a fisherman, and perhaps a surfer, in the village of Ekas.

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Ekas: bay of men 17
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
02 Mar 2016

Teens take some time out during the day to hang out, play music, or watch the sea from the shore. It's time to spend with friends or alone, as much time is spent fishing or surfing in the world famous waters of Indonesia.

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Ekas: bay of men 19
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
02 Mar 2016

As night falls with Mount Rinjani in the distance, the village leader's son plays with the trash left behind the fisherman along the banks of Ekas bay. The village becomes very lively as everyone enjoys the sunset, the cool air, and the ending of another day of simple hard labor.

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Ekas: bay of men 18
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
29 Feb 2016

Rumaji, a local fisherman of Ekas, pulls his nets in after sunrise to find his daily catch that will feed his family for the days to come. This small remote fishing village still remains completely self-sufficient with little need for resources further close to cities.

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Ekas: bay of men 02
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
29 Feb 2016

Rumaji, a fisherman of the small village of Ekas, prepares his boat at sunrise to collect the fish from his nets. Mount Rinjani, Lombok's one active volcano, sits off into the distance.

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Ekas: bay of men 08
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
28 Feb 2016

After a night of sailing and fishing, men bring their boats to the shore of Lombok's largest fish market, Tanjung Luar. After sunrise, primarily women, and some men, will wade to meet the boats then bring the fish into the market to be sold.

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Ekas: bay of men 16
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
27 Feb 2016

Left: Marine worms called "Nyale" come to certain beaches of southern Lombok to spawn once a year. The legend says that after Princess Mandalika jumped from the cliffs to save the island from war, her people searched the tidal flats below but only found nyale marine worms, which they believed were the magical infestation of her beautiful hair. Right: Ice is sold at the largest fish market on the island of Lombok to keep the fish fresh and able to transport across the island.

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Ekas: bay of men 20
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
27 Feb 2016

As the first light of day rises over the village of Ekas, a family collects nyale, a sea worm that comes to the southern coast of Lombok once a year and is part of the activities of the most important holiday of Sasak culture.

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Ekas: bay of men 01
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
27 Feb 2016

Men rest on the beach during the early morning of the Bau Nyale festival, a traditional holiday that occurs once a year on Lombok Island. It's a Sasak holiday that occurs for two days, on the 10th month of the Sasak calendar, and people travel to the southern coast for the festivities.

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Ekas: bay of men 12
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
26 Feb 2016

During the annual Sasak festival, Bau Nyale, men will perform peresean which is traditional stick fighting competition. This may represent the story how many kingdoms ago, Princess Mandalika had numerous suitors fighting for her hand in marriage. To prevent war and death on the beautiful and peaceful island of Lombok, she threw herself off the seaside cliffs to her death.

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Ekas: bay of men 04
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
25 Feb 2016

Sahram uses traditional tools for building fishing boats to carve a "gamboose" on the shore immediately after choosing and cutting the tree to be used for the traditional instrument. It will take an approximate week to make this 7 stringed instrument that will use a varied weight fishing line for strings.

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Ekas: bay of men 05
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
25 Feb 2016

Sitting on a traditional "bruga", to shade from the sun and allow the ocean breeze to cross, the loser at a game of dominos must wear a stone tied to his ear with fishing line.

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Ekas: bay of men 06
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
25 Feb 2016

Boys of fisherman living in the small Indonesian village of Ekas, cool off from the intense heat and play with miniature boats that were built with the help of their fathers.

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Ekas: bay of men 11
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
25 Feb 2016

A fisherman, his wife, and child pass to drop their fishing nets for the evening as Rumaji reuses a plastic bag to funnel petrol into the rudimentary internal combustion engine so the boat can return to the village of Ekas.

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Ekas: bay of men 15
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
25 Feb 2016

About a kilometer into the bay of Ekas, there is a single fish farm where most of the fish are exported to China and islands settled further north of the Indian Ocean.

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Ekas: bay of men 10
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
24 Feb 2016

While laboring over parts to repair fishing boats, the men of Ekas find ways to keep spirits high with jokes and laughter among themselves.

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Ekas: bay of men 13
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
24 Feb 2016

A young shepherd turns his attention away from his flock of sheep to watch a group of local surfers along the horizon of the crystal clear waters of the Indian Ocean.

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Ekas: bay of men 03
Ekas, Lombok
By Eleanor Moseman
24 Feb 2016

Jamal, a fisherman of Ekas Bay, uses zip ties to attach a new bamboo beam to help the balance of this fishing boat. During the day, most men will be repairing boats or nets. His sandals have been clipped to allow for more stability and control.

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The Gold Fever of Lombok
lombok
By Elisabetta Zavoli
29 Apr 2014

Indonesia has a long tradition of gold mining. The country is in fact one of the world’s top gold producers. But when the price of gold increased in 2007 and early 2008, an illegal gold rush began. “Before 2009, people in the Mount Prabu area were all farmers or day workers. In 2008, people from Java and Kalimantan came here to teach us how to extract gold from the soil and rocks. Since then, everyone wants to be a miner”, Dina, an inhabitant, explains. The reason behind people's interest in gold mining is easy to understand. An average daily income for a farmer or a fisherman, living in central and south Lombok, is about 10 thousand Rupees, less than one US Dollar, while the daily earnings from gold mining activity can be five to ten times that amount.. At first, villagers became wealthy quickly because the first layers of ground were naturally rich in gold. Between 2008 and 2009, there were 10 to 20 grams of gold in every 30 kilogram bag of ore. However, in 2014 the concentration of gold in the soil has decreased to less than one gram per bag. The situation has drastically changed but villagers have not been able to save or invest the gains they made during the first years of activity. Most of them have spent all their money on consumer goods such as motorbikes, jewelry and hi-tech items. “When there will be no more ore to be processed for gold, I’ll come back to be a farmer”, Dina says. The gold rush in Lombok has not only changed the economy of a region, it has also had a serious impact on the environment. Today, the hills in Sekotong Province look like a gruyere cheese. Hundreds of meters of tunnels have been dug and now form a dense network that has weakened the hills from inside. Miners, most of whom are former farmers without any kind of knowledge of mining, dig tirelessly on land owned by someone else. As modern sharecroppers, they give the owner 5 bags full of soil for every 15 bags they collect, without knowing the concentration of gold in each bag. They keep the other 10 bags as their salaries. What remains is equally divided among the miners working in the same tunnel. Gold mining is a hazardous job. Many miners died when a tunnel collapsed on them. Mercury and cyanide slurry are everywhere. Miners use them without any kind of protection. Mercury accumulates in the body, degrading the nervous system and leading sometimes to madness. In 2011, Sekotong Province counted around 12 thousand grinders. Each grinder can mill 5 kilograms of raw ore and needs a hundred grams of liquid mercury to extract gold. Usually, the family of the miner can do two to three cycles of processing per day, using the same mercury for several extractions. Although the use of mercury in gold mining is illegal in Indonesia, it is commonly used to extract gold. Every year, tens of tons of mercury are released in the environment. In Lombok, gold fever seems to be more dangerous than dengue fever.