Frame 0004
Sunni Tribesmen Guard Their Borders A...
Shabwa
By Dhaifallah Homran
19 Feb 2015

February 19, 2015
Shabwa, Yemen

Sunni tribesmen, belonging to the Markha al-Alya tribe of the southern Yemeni province of Shabwa, announced today that they are closing their border with the neighboring al-Baydaa province. Situated to the west of Shabwa, al-Baydaa has been the scene of fierce battles between the Houthis and local tribesmen, who are trying to prevent the Houthis from advancing south.

In their announcement the Markha al-Alya tribe emphatically rejected the constitutional declaration of the Houthis and banned any military group from entering Shabwa. They have positioned their fighters along the border and installed sentries on the Farsha passage, the road which connects the neighboring provinces.

The tribesmen assured that they will defend their land to the death and not allow it to become a thoroughfare for Houthis and other armed groups to transport their soldiers and weapons. They are working in conjunction with the local authorities who support their mission to defend Shabwa.

Transcript

Soundbite Sheikh Monser Salem al-Kabali, Tribal Leader (Man, Arabic)

"Based on the agreement among the tribe leaders, dignitaries and local authorities, we announce that we refuse the constitutional declaration made by the Houthis. We support the constitutionally legitimate authorities and will not accept any agreement outside the consensus among political powers in Yemen. Our stance regarding the Shabwa province follows that of the governor. It is guided by the governor of Shabwa as well as the security committee and the tribes in Shabwa and the regions of Hadramoot and Muhar al-Shabwa. We will stand against anyone who wants to use our province as a gate for chaos, whether they are armed militias, tribes or [any other] groups. We declare our support of the local authorities in the province in their bid to protect Shabwa borders from all directions."

Frame 0004
Cameroonian Army Battles Boko Haram
Fotokol, Amchide
By Transterra Editor
16 Feb 2015

WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT

February 16, 17, 2015
Fotokol; Amchide; Kolofata, Northern Cameroon

Cameroonian special forces soldiers from the Batallion d'Intervention Rapide (B.I.R.), or Rapid Intervention Battalion patrol villages and battle Boko Haram fighters along the Cameroonian-Nigerian border between the towns of Fotokol, Kolofata, and Amchide.

Located in the extreme north of Cameroon, along the Nigerian frontier, these towns have been the scene of intense fighting between Boko Haram and both Cameroonian and Nigerian troops, who have been trying to secure the porous border. The town of Fotokol was the scene of a massacre of 70 civilians by Boko Haram in early February. Cameroonian troops are now participating in an African Union funded alliance aimed at encircling and finishing off Boko Haram. The alliance also includes Nigeria, Niger, Chad, and Benin. An assault by Cameroonian forces against Boko Haram in the Nigerian village of Ndaba on March 13, 14, 2015 highlights the cross border nature of this ongoing battle.

This footage includes shots of Cameroonian troops engaging Boko Haram in Fotokol and Amchide; shots of civilians fleeing the fighting; shots of dead civilians killed by Boko Haram; an interview with a survivor of the Fotokol massacre; and shots of the river separating Nigeria and Cameroon near Fotokol.

Frame 0004
Unidentified Body Lands Near Lebanon-...
Marjaayoun
By lotfallah
15 Feb 2015

Marjaayoun, Lebanon

February 15, 2015

An unidentified object fell from the sky in south Lebanon near the border with Israel on Sunday, February 15, according to eyewitnesses. The Lebanese Army searched for the unknown white body, which landed near the Lebanese town of Deir Mimas.

Israeli forces routinely monitor south Lebanon using warplanes and remotely controlled drones. Hezbollah is also known to have to launched several unmanned drones as part of its conflict with Israel.

Frame 0004
Together in Kobane: Former Refugee Re...
Kobane
By Bedir
10 Feb 2015

Kobani, Syria
February 10, 2015

After leaving her hometown of Kobani and living in Turkey for several months, Siddiqa Barkal was happily reunited with her husband and two sons who remained in the city to fight against ISIS. Siddiqa’s three daughters and her youngest son were also rejoiced to return with her.
Siddiqa’s husband, Ismat Sheikh Hassan, is the head of the Defense Committee in the Kobani Canton, part of the autonomous district proclaimed by the Kurdish Democratic Union Party, known by the Kurdish acronym PYD. He was widely quoted by Western media during the battle for Kobani.
Siddiqa says that she was very sad to leave her hometown and live in exile, despite the warm welcome she received in Turkey. She took the risk of returning to Kobani even before ISIS fighters were defeated because her young children could not bear living outside their city.
In Kobani, Siddiqa stood by her husband, sons and other fighters of the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) during the battles and made them food until they won over the battle against ISIS.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of family in living room

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Woman) Siddiqa Barkal, Refugee Who Returned to Kobani

01:01 - 09:45

“We left when ISIS attacked Kobani on [September] 20. We did not leave willingly. We wanted to stay in Kobani and live with the comrades and fighters. We wanted to be martyred with them. Seven days after I left Kobani with my children, they convinced me of returning. We returned but could not enter. My children and I stayed in Suruc. They did not tolerate to live outside Kobani. They kept saying that they wanted to return. I had three girls and a young boy with me. Even though my children could not live outside of Kobani, the situation there did not allow us to return. The father of my children and two of my children were fighting in the city. The rest of my children and I were very worried about them. My young son Hamza used to cry and say, ‘I cannot stand living outside Kobani because my friends are not here. I feel lonely when I am outside my city.’ In Suruc, my children and I were living in a house. My children never left the house during the day. On certain days, they used to sleep during the day and stay up at night watching television. On the 25th of the month, my older daughter went to Kobani. She called me, saying, ‘I cannot take it anymore. My father and two brothers are in Kobani and I need to go and see them. I want to stay in my city, Kobani.’
“I had many friends and acquaintances in northern Turkey who offered to let me live in their homes. I went near to Kobani on several occasions. My young son and I cried as smoke was rising from the buildings. The sound of explosions and gunshots was heard. Warplanes were bombing and the city was being destroyed. We were very worried about our friends who were fighting to defend the city. One day, I decided to return to Kobani while ISIS mercenaries were still there. I called my daughter then to tell her that we were coming and she told her father. My husband called me, saying: ‘Why did you not tell us that you were coming?’ I returned to Kobani and he was very happy. Some were worried that my children would be affected by the scenes of killing and destruction. There were also worried that ISIS was still there. “I used to make dinner for the fighters on the front and help them. We never thought that ISIS could have control over us. Many people used to ask me whether Kobani will fall or not. I used to say to them that Kobani will never fall and that it shall be victorious. 'We will fight until the last drop of our blood and the last stone in the city.’ I kept saying this to the women and mothers. The ideas of leader Abdullah Ocalan were behind the victory. Male and female fighters are fighting by relying on their own capabilities and conviction. They were not pushed by anyone; they were not forced to do this. They are fighting with their hearts, which is why they will achieve victory. For example, when you make a child carry something, he will carry it but he might fail. If he carries it with his own will and strength, he will succeed. The young men and women came from all parts of Kurdistan. We consider the member of the People’s Protection Units and the Women’s Protection Units our sons and daughters and parts of our bodies. They are sacrificing their lives for their land, which is why we will achieve victory. “I cannot describe the way I felt when we returned to Kobani. We felt so much joy. My little son Hamza was thrilled because he returned to his friends. I asked my son on our way back, ‘Who do you want to see first, your brothers or your father?’ He said: ‘I want to return to my friends.’ Friendship is more important for him. When I was in Kobani, I was very happy to see the comrade fighters. I did not believe that I was actually with them, and that I was embraced by Kobani. When the comrade fighters liberated Kobani from ISIS mercenaries, I was trembling. I was so happy that I did not understand what was happening. I asked a woman near me: ‘Am I in Kobani? Has it been liberated?’ “I cannot describe the joy I felt. When I left Kobani, I felt as if one of my sons or the father of my children was martyred. We all cried when we left. Even my young son went to the comrades and held their hands, saying: ‘I want to stay in Kobani and be martyred.’ When I left Kobani, I was told that I would return in seven days. My son was fighting on the eastern front, where battles were the fiercest. I did not tell anyone that I was leaving. When my son heard about it he said: ‘Mother, why are you leaving?’ I told him that I was not leaving willingly, and that I was leaving because the comrades wanted me to. When I left, I did not bid my sons farewell. It was a very painful moment. I cannot forget that moment. The moment I crossed the border was very painful. I cannot describe it. “Now that Kobani has been liberated, people will return to the city in the next few weeks. Those whose houses were destroyed will rebuild their houses. We have to help each other, take care of ourselves and return to our previous lives. We will live a happy life. Rojava [Syrian part of Kurdistan] will be fully liberated from ISIS mercenaries, especially that they were defeated in Kobani. The People’s Protection Units and the Women’s Protection Units have pledged to fight ISIS wherever they were. We, the people, should help the members of these forces who are sacrificing their lives for the homeland.”

Various of family inside the house
Various of young Hamza
Various of family and guests in front of the house

Frame 0004
Turkey: Anti-ISIS Civilian Border Pat...
Turkey-Syria Border
By Ibrahim Karci
08 Feb 2015

From the beginning of the battle for Kobane, many volunteers from numerous districts around Turkey gathered in the villages close to the border to help patrol the border and prevent ISIS fighters from slipping in and out of Syria. Despite the fact that that Kurdish forces have now cleared Kobane of ISIS fighters, volunteers still patrol in the villages close to the border, fearing ISIS remnants will slip through.

TRANSCRIPT

Interview with Halit Çelikarslan – Villager
00.37– 00.50: Since the first day of the resistance, from different parts of Turkey, even from abroad, people came here, with the aim of helping the people resisting in Kobane.

00.52 – 00.56: We received help from them.

00.57 – 01.26: Usually young people and women were coming here. They worked united, stayed in tents for days in bad weather conditions and served the cause in many ways.

Interview with Emin Baran – Lawyer and Volunteer aid worker in Suruc
Journalist:
01.31 – 01.36: Why were the border patrols initially started?

Emin:
01.36 – 01.43 People were passing the border from Kobane to here, so people felt obligated to welcome them, since their passage was stopped frequently [by Turkish border patrols].
01.44 – 01.46 [Turkish] Soldiers tried to keep them in restricted areas.
01.47 – 01.53 Some of them [refugees] were injured. So, to have a front group on the border became necessary.
01.56 – 02.04 After the displacement came to the end, people kept patrolling in order to ensure that ISIS would not get help in Kobane.
02.05 – 02.10 Essentially, it was aimed to not letting ISIS gain strength in Kobane by using Turkish land.
02.18 – 02.28 The border patrols had two purposes. First, to show the people of Kobane that others are supporting them in their resistance.
02.29 – 02.35 Second, to narrow the movements of ISIS in Turkey. [Turkish] Soldiers blockaded the villages in which people were border guarding.
02.36 – 02.46 Every time the [Turkish] soldiers tried to force people to leave the [border] villages [which were located literally right beside ISIS held areas]. ISIS attacks gained enormous strength, immediately after.
02.47 – 02.50 Without exception, this happened each and every time.

Interview with Figen Yaşar-Mayor of Mus Bulanik from HDP
02.52 – 02.56 We initially came here during the beginning of the resistance in Kobane.
02.57 – 03.02 We first watched the border for seven days, during the peak of the clashes.
03.03 – 03.07 After, we went back to Muş and Bulanık, where we came.
03.09 – 03.16 During our second shift [on the border] we stayed here for nine days. Those days the clashes were really severe.
03.17 – 03.23 From Kobane to the air, smoke and fire clouds were raising.
03.24 – 03.30 We brought 12-13 martyr bodies to our village alone.
03.31 – 03.37 They were all the children of this land. Some of them joined to the war three months ago, some five months, and some six years.
03.39 – 03.46 Kobane has been cleansed [of ISIS fighters], but there are hundreds of villages connected to the Kobane [which ISIS controls].
03.47 – 04.02 Until the villages of Kobane are liberated, until the people of Kobane go back their homes and settle there, the people of Kurdistan and Turkey will guard and keep guarding.

Interview with Head of the security in the Village-(Name withheld)
04.07 – 04.13 I am responsible for the security of this district. I have been here for 95 days.
04.13 – 04.19 We explain to the border guards how to prevent ISIS from crossing.
04.20 – 04.23 Usually they cross from this district.
04.25 – 04.29 The ones who want to participate can easily cross the border.
04.30 – 04.36 As you see, that's the border for the guards. Between 6 pm and 6 am people [civilians] keep guarding.
04.38 – 04.42 There are other check points in other villages.
04.43 – 04.50 When they see them [refugees] from the distance, they inform us and we help them through.
04.54 – 04.57 The border guards notices us.
05.03 – 05.04 “hello” “hello”
05.10 – 05.11 Are taking over the shift?
05.11 – 05.12 Yes, two people in each shift.
05.19 – 05.20 Thank you.

05.28 – 05.29 We keep guard here, we can't leave.
05.29 – 05.31 We came for the shift change. You can leave now.

Filiz Aydın - Volunteer Watch Guard
05.34 – 05.42 We began guarding when ISIS come to Kobane. Not only in this village, but also in others.
05.43 – 05.55 The reason I keep guard is to prevent ISIS soldiers crossing the border. I also lost my brother at the war.
05.56 – 05.58 Not in Kobane, but in Rojava, in Serikani, I lost my brother.
05.59 – 06.04 My brother might be still alive if we watched the borders in Serikani.
06.06 – 06.14 It was his cause, and if we have the same cause, if we want his dreams to come true, we can also contribute.
06.15 – 06.25 Not everyone can get involved in armed battles in the mountains. Not everyone can fight in Kobane, but you can do whatever your hands find to do.
06.27 – 06.32 We say Kobane got liberated, but some of the villages are still under the siege.
06.33 – 06.39 Even if Kobane is cleansed [of ISIS], it's not just Kobane. Until Rojava gets liberated...
06.41 – 06.47 As I said it's not only about ISIS, it was first Al-Nusrah, Al-Qaida, and now ISIS.
06.48 – 06.54 There is Qamishle, Afrin... Until Rojava is completely cleansed,
06.55 – 07.05 Until the canton's [Rojava] political autonomy is recognized by the world, this is my opinion, the threat won't be defeated.

Thumb sm
Israeli Tank Breaks Down at Lebanon B...
Kafr Kila, Lebanon
By [email protected]
05 Feb 2015

A week after a cross border raid by Hezbollah killed two Israeli soldiers, an Israeli Merkava tank breaks down at the border fence separating Israel from Lebanon. An extraction team was dispatched to repair and remove the tank from the area.

Frame 0004
Drawing Conflict: Cartoon Journalist ...
Bekaa
By travis beard
04 Feb 2015

Bekaa, Lebanon

February 4, 2015

Some say the Charlie Hebdo attack changed the political cartoon world forever and that the threat to cartoonists has never been so strong. However, should this perceived threat prevent cartoonists from still covering sensitive issues? Should all journalistic cartoonists feel threatened?

One cartoon journalist set out to show that cartoonists should not limit themselves. Jules Callis, who comes from the Netherlands, had clear doubts about his decision to travel to Lebanon to document the Syrian refugee crisis just days after the attack. However, Callis was not about to shy away from a subject and determinedly made the decision to travel to the Syrian border to tell the real story of Syria's refugees through comic journalism.

Frame 0004
Shelling on Lebanon's Southern Border
Ghajar Aassabbiye, Lebanon
By Karamallah Daher
28 Jan 2015

Footage from inside Lebanon shows Israeli shells landing on Lebanese soil and Lebanese Army soldiers scouring the area to keep watch of the situation. The shelling began after Hezbollah forces attacked an Israeli Army convoy in retaliation for an Israeli attack on Hezbollah forces inside Syria.

Thumb sm
Refugee Camps
Gaziantep
By Felipe Passolas
21 Jan 2015

Living conditions of the refugee camps in the Syrian Border

Thumb sm
Kurdish People
Kobanî
By Felipe Passolas
21 Jan 2015

The kurdish people and their way of living due to the Islamic States attacks in the Syrian border near Kobane.

Thumb sm
Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehicles
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
21 Jan 2015

Like drones in the sky, unmanned armored remote control land vehicles are already seeing extensive action on the Israel-Gaza border. The Israeli Army is now the first and only Army in the world that uses these land drones in combat zones. The unmanned remote control vehicles come in two sizes and are armed with 0.5 Calibre Machine guns and other classified armoury. The vehicles are controlled and driven by IDF women operators only and patrol the border between Israel and the Hamas controlled Gaza strip, replacing manned patrols and saving lives and manpower. During the years they have been operational, the unmanned patrols have been attacked twice by IED`S and machine gunfire. They have discovered breaches in the border fence and chased down infiltrators. During the last 50 day war between Israel and Hamas, they carried out many missions, mostly suppllying fighting units with food and ammunition behind enemy lines. They also conducted surveillance operations. "This is the future of the modern combat field " says the commander of this unique unit.

Frame 0004
Israeli Army Patrols the Lebanese Border
Lebanon-Israel border
By [email protected]
06 Dec 2014

Marjoyoun, Lutfallah al-Daher

The Israeli forces have started the process of shielding their locations and tank stations on the hill overlooking al-Motanazahat and al-Wazani.

An armored bulldozer was seen establishing a new location to overlook al-Wazani and al-Motanazahat, under extreme protection by a Merkava tank and a military vehicle.

On the Lebanese side, UNIFIL members and the army have witnessed the Israeli work that started on Saturday, a holiday for Israelis.

Thumb sm
YIBO CAMP
Gaziantep
By Felipe Passolas
30 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
Fpc3138
Unnamed Road, Alanyurt/Şanlıurfa,Turkey
By Felipe Passolas
29 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
kurdish women
Unnamed Road, Alanyurt/Şanlıurfa,Turkey
By Felipe Passolas
29 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
kurdish suppoters
Kobanî, Syria
By Felipe Passolas
29 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
food, camps, refugees
Gaziantep
By Felipe Passolas
29 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
surç hospital, wounded fighters
Unnamed Road, Alanyurt/Şanlıurfa,Turkey
By Felipe Passolas
28 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
kurdish familly weading
Kobanî, Syria
By Felipe Passolas
28 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
turkish army in kobane
Yumurtalık Köyü Yolu, Yumurtalık/Şanlıurfa,Turkey
By Felipe Passolas
27 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
kobane
Yumurtalık Köyü Yolu, Yumurtalık/Şanlıurfa,Turkey
By Felipe Passolas
27 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
kobane fighters
Gaziantep Şanlıurfa Yolu, Mürşitpınar,Syria
By Felipe Passolas
27 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
kurdish refugees
Unnamed Road, Alanyurt/Şanlıurfa,Turkey
By Felipe Passolas
25 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
towns near the syrian border
Unnamed Road, Alanyurt/Şanlıurfa,Turkey
By Felipe Passolas
25 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
refugees living in a mosque
Unnamed Road, Alanyurt/Şanlıurfa,Turkey
By Felipe Passolas
25 Nov 2014

the Mêser mosque is now both refuge and religious building.Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
towns near the syrian border
Kobanî, Syria
By Felipe Passolas
25 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
towns near the syrian borderg
Kobanî, Syria
By Felipe Passolas
25 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
towns near the syrian border, kids
Kobanî, Syria
By Felipe Passolas
25 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
gun, kurdish family in suruç
Kobanî, Syria
By Felipe Passolas
25 Nov 2014

Daham Baz is proud to keep his family safe at home in the border town of Suruç. None ISIS terrorist will get closer to the family or friends without facing my 9 mm parabelum, he says. Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
kurdish familly
Kobanî, Syria
By Felipe Passolas
25 Nov 2014

Daham Baz is proud to keep his family safe at home in the border town of Suruç. None ISIS terrorist will get closer to the family or friends without facing my 9 mm parabelum, he says. Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
mosque
Kobanî, Syria
By Felipe Passolas
25 Nov 2014

the Mêser mosque is now both refuge and religious building.Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
turkish border
Unnamed Road, Alanyurt/Şanlıurfa,Turkey
By Felipe Passolas
24 Nov 2014

Turkish soldiers, always keeping an eye tow both sides of the border and the Kurdish manifestations in support of the city.Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
isis village in syria
Unnamed Road, Alanyurt/Şanlıurfa,Turkey
By Felipe Passolas
24 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS

Thumb sm
isis village in syria
Unnamed Road, Alanyurt/Şanlıurfa,Turkey
By Felipe Passolas
24 Nov 2014

Suruç, Turkish border. Kobane. Syrian war. Refugees and soldiers. ISIS