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In exile: Iraqi women seek refuge
Bardarash, Dohuk, Rovia, Diyarbakir
By Arianna Pagani
24 Sep 2014

During the days of terror on Mount Sinjar, about 200 women were kidnapped by the militias of the Islamic State to be converted to Islam and sold in the occupied cities of Mosul and Tal Afar. This barbarism is not new to the chronicles of war.

The Islamic State's attack on Mount Sinjar led to the exodus of about 500,000 people, mostly from the Christian, Yazidi and Shabak minorities. These refugees, currently under the protection of the Kurdish militias, are living in the streets, under bridges or in abandoned places in Erbil and surrounding villages. Many of those who manage to escape the conflict have suffered losses in their family that effect them not only economically, but mentally and emotionally. Depression and anxiety in addition to insecurity are a constant challenge.

The UNHCR anticipated there to be over 900,000 internally displaced people in Iraq by the end of 2014. With the rise of ISIS, that number has been more than tripled, with 2.9 million displaced according to International Displacement Monitoring Center. The situation of internally displaced women, not only in Iraq but in conflict zones around the world, is especially precarious as the breakdown in social structures is a risk factor for gender-based violence. In their planning document for 2014, the UNHCR says it is ramping up its efforts to protect refugee and internally displaced women. However, agencies like the UNHCR as well as local associations can only care for and provide aid to so many displaced people, leaving others to fend for themselves.

The condition of the women and children displaced in Iraq is tragic: not only from a material point of view, but also from a psychological and ethical perspective. While talking with them, the elderly were crying because they don't see a future for their land, culture or traditions and were continuously asking, "What did we do wrong to deserve to be killed?" The women were mostly passive, trapped between emotions, tears, the inability to react, “deafened by pain and suffering.” They seemed to understand that as time passes by, the hope of returning to a normal and fair life fades away.

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The Salt Workers of the Danakil Depre...
Berahile, Ethiopia
By Christina Feldt
30 Apr 2013

The Danakil Depression -- specifically the area surrounding Lake Afdera is the place where the majority of the salt production in Ethiopia is found. The lake yields more than 1.3 million tons of salt annually and around 750 officially registered salt miners work in this area. Teams of Muslim Afar and Christian Tigrayans from the Ethiopian Highlands gather daily to mine the salt and transport it by camelsand donkyes to a small town called Berahile. In the past, the salt blocks -- called amolé were used all over Ethiopia as money. Although cash has replaced the salt, the trade itself remains the main livelihood of the Ethiopian Afar. They guard and manage the “white gold” as their greatest treasure.

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Saisei - Recovery (26 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Mar 2013

Taka makes preparation for going to his company. He wakes up early every morning because it takes about one hour by a train to go to his company from his home. Tokyo, Japan. Aug. 2011

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Saisei: Coming To Life
Tokyo, Japan
By U.S. Editor
28 Feb 2013

"Saisei" means to come to life again and to recover through time. In Japan, the annual number of suicides has exceeded 30,000. By prefecture, Tokyo had the most suicides, at 3,100. Furthermore, the annual number of people who attempted suicide is said to be the 10 times. This serious number can clearly represent the tough and difficult social life of Japan. However, this ridiculous number does not appeal any individuals’ struggles behind their real dramas. I am following two parsons who attempted suicide to tell their stories through their cases and look at the meaning of living in this society.

" I still wonder why I am alive here."

Taka Fukushima, 43 years old who quietly decided to kill himself three years ago because he had been suffered from depression and asthma due to stress of work for long time. Then, he hung himself with a thick rope which he had for his hobby, canoeing. As soon as he was found by his grand-father in his room, he was sent to the emergency hospital with his heart stopped beating. The doctor said he would be left with a severe after effect, although he might come arrive. After two weeks, everyone thought it was a miracle when he opened his eyes again and he even did not show much permanent damage. He spent a month in the hospital and took a break for a year. Luckily enough, he has found himself a job in the design industry and decided to return to the society. However, he said that it is not so easy to live again in this society for him because Japanese society tends to not accept people who dropped out even once. Now he is working hard without telling anyone his past of attempting suicide. He said, "I do my best a little more as it is. I feel that I was saved by invisible some kind of will, so I must live".

"I was saved by my child."

Emi Asai, 35 years old has been suffering from depression and panic disorder which caused by a stress of work when she was 21 years old. One day five years ago, she made up in a face neatly and changed into a dress she loved and wrote a will at her room, then she intended to die and took medicine more than 300 tablets. Fortunately, she was found by her husband and was done gastric irrigation immediately at a hospital and escaped death. One year after she leaving a hospital, she became pregnant and a baby has made her get hope to live again. She said, "I still has been suffering from mental disorder and sometime I can not control myself. If I has not been given a child, I would commit suicide again. As far as there is my child, I must live for her". Now she helps her husband's company and studies to get a license of psychology counselor.

In 2012, the number of suicide fell below 30,000 for the first time in 15 years. However it is still high number throughout the world. There are about 300,000 people who attempted suicide in Japan and they are struggling to live like them I have covered.

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Saisei - Recovery (12 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Aug 2012

Taka wearing life jacket for his hoby, canoeing stands alone in a shore. Tokyo, Japan. Sep. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (23 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Jul 2012

Taka has a dinner alone every night. He takes couple of pills to surpress the dejection of his mind since he attempted suicide. Tokyo, Japan. Aug. 2011

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Saisei - Recovery (25 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Jun 2012

Taka prays at a shrine every morning before going to his company since he attempted suicide. Tokyo, Japan. Oct. 2011

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Saisei - Recovery (22 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Jun 2012

Taka is on a way to his home after working. He works hard untill midnight everyday. Tokyo, Japan. Aug. 2011

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Saisei - Recovery (15 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Jun 2012

Taka in a train going back to his hometown. Tokyo, Japan. Sep. 2011

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Salt Workers of The Danakil Depressio...
Berahile, Ethiopia
By Transterra Editor
02 May 2012

The Danakil depression -- specifically the area surrounding Lake Afdera is the place where the majority of the salt production in Ethiopia is found. The lake yields more than 1.3 million tons of salt annually and around 750 officially registered salt miners work in this area. Teams of Muslim Afar and Christian Tigrayans from the Ethiopian Highlands gather daily to mine the salt and transport it by camelsand donkyes to a small town called Berahile. In the past, the salt blocks -- called amolé -- were used all over Ethiopia as money. Although cash has replaced the salt, the trade itself remains the main livelihood of the Ethiopian Afar. They guard and manage the “white gold” as their greatest treasure.

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Saisei - Recovery (24 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 May 2012

Taka is in a station. He takes a train to go to a company in rush hour every morning. Tokyo, Japan. Sep. 2011

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Saisei - Recovery (18 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 May 2012

Taka stands on a crossing in a town. He is on a way to a hospital. Tokyo, Japan. Jun. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (16 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 May 2012

Taka in a station with his friend who know his past of attempting suicide. Tokyo, Japan. Apr.2012

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Saisei - Recovery (14 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 May 2012

Taka stares at a wild cat on a road. Tokyo, Japan. Aug.2012

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Saisei - Recovery (13 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 May 2012

Taka comes out from a consulting room. He has seen to a hospital for psychological counseling once a month since he attempting suicide. Tokyo, Japan. Mar. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (21 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Apr 2012

His table in a room. Taka can not arrange anything. Tokyo, Japan. Aug. 2011

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Saisei - Recovery (19 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Apr 2012

Taka smokes a pipe in his room. Tokyo, Japan. Apr.2012

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Saisei - Recovery (20 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Mar 2012

Taka is relaxed with smoking a pipe in his room. Tokyo, Japan. Apr. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (17 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Mar 2012

Taka talks with his friend in a cafe. He has not told his past of attempting suicide to anyone except only this friend. Tokyo, Japan. Apr. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (3 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Aug 2011

Emi hugs her new born baby in a restaurant. Tokyo, Japan. Aug. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (11 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Aug 2011

Emi and her child do watering to floweres. Tokyo, Japan. Aug. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (1 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Jul 2011

Emi and her child's shoes in an entrance of their home. Tokyo, Japan. Apr. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (9 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Jun 2011

A wedding picture of Emi. She married when she was 24 years old and then she was a hard woker as a sales women in a company. Two years after wedding, she attempted suicide. Tokyo, Japan. Sep. 2011

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Saisei - Recovery (8 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Jun 2011

Emi and her child playing are in a child room. Tokyo, Japan. Sep. 2011

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Saisei - Recovery (4 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 May 2011

Emi, her cousin and their children sit a waiting seet in a restaurant. Tokyo, Japan. Aug. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (2 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 May 2011

Emi and her child playing with a broom are in an entrance of their home. Tokyo, Japan. Apr. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (10 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 May 2011

Emi looks her child playing in a park. Tokyo, Japan. Oct. 2011

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Saisei - Recovery (6 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Apr 2011

Emi and her child with a shoping bag in a car. Tokyo, Japan. Aug. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (7 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Mar 2011

Emi cooks in a kitchen and a familly picture put on a shelf. Her husband owns his small company and works ver hard as a president. Tokyo, Japan. Apr. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (5 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Mar 2011

A pouch of chinese medicine on a table. Emi takes it every day to suppress the dejection of her mind since 21 years old. Tokyo, Japan. Oct. 2011