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Catching more plastic than fish.002
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.004
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

A dumpsite was opened in 2013 close to Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, affecting the ecosystems in the area and reducing the amount of fish in the waters. Today Navotas is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.007
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Plastic collected around Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.003
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.006
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.005
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Kids play in Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.008
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Pablo Rosales, 59, is the leader of the National Alliance of Fishers in the Philippines, a country where plastic pollution is affecting fishermen who have seen their catches reduced over the years. The problem is especially acute at the Manila Bay, due to the pollution coming from the city.

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Catching more plastic than fish.009
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.011
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Zaldy Conde, 45, waits at Navotas' dock, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.015
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Fishermen catch mussels in Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where catches have drastically dropped due to plastic pollution in the area. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.012
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared or are smaller. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.014
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Fishermen from Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where catches drastically dropped after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.010
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Christopher P. Lapio, 35, is a fisherman from Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where catches drastically dropped after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.013
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Fishermen from Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where catches drastically dropped after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.017
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

A fisherman from Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where catches drastically dropped after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.018
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Zaldy Conde, 45, prepares his boat in Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.016
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Christopher P. Lapio, 35, is a fisherman from Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where catches drastically dropped after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.020
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.001
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Trash Collectors
Manila
By Ralf Falbe
13 Jun 2016

Men carry bags of trash along the shoreline of Manila Bay, Philippines

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Handmade Yemeni Daggers, 10,000 Dolla...
Sanaa
By MENA Desk
01 Dec 2014

It is rare to see a Yemeni man in public without a traditional dagger on his waist. While many would think of a dagger as simply a weapon, Yemenis consider it a necessary tool in a man’s daily life.

Some Yemenis are even willing to spend a large amount of money for a dagger. Tens of
thousands of dollars, and more. Sheikh Naji Ben Abdil Aziz al-Shayef, the head of the Yemeni Sheikhs, is said to have paid one million dollars to buy a dagger once owned by Emam Ahmad Hamid Eddine, the ruler of Yemen from 1948 to 1962.

The al-Azizi Family has been handcrafting and selling daggers for over a hundred years. The craft has been handed down through generations. The family owns the most famous dagger workshop and store in Old Sanaa.

Hussein Mohamad al-Azizi, the family patriarch, says the dagger is an essential accessory, a
Yemeni tradition just like the ‘Oqal’, the white head dress worn by men in the Gulf. His son Hussein Hussein al-Azizi believes the dagger is a symbol of power and honor for Yemeni men.

Yemeni daggers consist of three parts. The first is the handle, which determines the price of the dagger based on the material used. The second part is the blade, and the third is the belt used to carry the dagger on the waist.

The fanciest and most expensive daggers are the ‘Seifani’, with handles made of the horn of a rhinoceros. These have become rare since the hunting and trade of rhinoceros parts was banned by international agreement.

The second level, ‘Ivory’, are daggers with handles made from the tusks of elephants. The third level, ‘Kerk’, have handles made of the horns of bulls. The lowest level, mainly manufactured in China, have handles of wood, fiberglass or plastic.

Interviews:

Hussein Hussein al-Azizi, Merchant:

(00:41-01:29) I carry the Dagger, because it is an accessory for myself, and a pride for all the Yemenis. It is not a weapon as many consider, it is an accessory for men, and they used it in the old times as a weapon when they used to travel from a city to another or from a village to another, and because Yemen is a wild area full of mountains, and because many wild animals are spread across the area, in that case it is used as a weapons for protection, for the lack of guns and mechanic weapons.

(01:37-02:20) What makes my dagger special is, apart from the fact that a man always prefers his own possessions, that it is made from the horn of a rhinoceros. I believe it is really special and better than other jambiyas and it is worth $10,000. There are even more luxurious ones but I believe in the old proverb which says, "My beast is better than the King's horse."

(02:26-03:09) The yemeni dagger has many usages, such as in weddings, it is used as an accessory specially by the groom, and it is essential in “al-Baraa” dance (traditional Yemeni dance). What differs the daggers is the shape and the way it is made. What determine its price is the shape and the type of horn it is made of.

Hussein Mohamad al-Azizi, Dagger Workshop Owner:

(04:27-06:47) It is made from the horn of the rhinoceros, dates back to the time of Bin Zi Yazan .

Dagger initially became popular because they are the main aspect of the Yemeni accessory. Daggers differ from city to another and from a village to another. For example; in Saade province, dagger have a specific shape, different from the one in Maareb, Taaz al-Mohabsha, Al-hadarmi, and Sanaa, which has a very special collection.

The best dagger currently is al-Azizi dagger, and al-Sefani, which dates back to 400-600 years. It is made from the horn Rhinoceros. There is a difference between the daggers made from the horn of the Rhinoceros and the Kerk dagger made from the horn of bulls, and the Chinese dagger, which ruined the market.
There has been a ban on hunting rhinos since 1982 enforced by The United Nations, especially for Yemenis, so we had to rely on Kerk daggers made of bull’s horns, so we can keep selling and not lose our profession and preserve this Yemeni accessory. Each country has it’s own accessory type, in Oman for example they used daggers, in the Gulf they use “Oqal” (the white head dress), every country has its own traditions.

I want to correct some misunderstood information about daggers; they say that Yemenis use daggers used as weapons. I want to correct this piece of information to say that; they used them as weapons back in the time when they used to travel from a city to another, and go through long roads, and face wild animals, that is the only case when they used daggers as weapons. Other than that case, they are only used as an accessory, even 2-4 year old children carry daggers that are made for them, different from al-Sefani daggers.

(07:04-07:32) As for the blade, the sharp metal part, we get it from Hadramout, We have different types, Jubi, Adani (from Adan), Taazi (from Taaz), Senaani (from Sanaa). I currently have all types.

Shot List:

Various shots of daggers in al-Azizi shop
Various shots show the production of the daggers in al-Aziz workshop
Various shots of grooms with daggers on their waists
Various shots of grooms dancing “al-Baraa” traditional Yemeni dance in a mass wedding

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Besieged Syrians Extract Fuel from Pl...
Eastern Ghouta
By Jawad Arbini
14 Aug 2014

Eastern Ghouta, Damascus, Syria

Syrians in the besieged Damascus suburb of Eastern Ghouta have found an innovative way to turn plastic waste into petrol in light of a fuel shortage in the deprived neighborhood. While this fascinating process produces a desperately needed resource, it is also a very dirty and polluting. Toxic smoke from burning plastic engulfs the little courtyard where the fuel is produced and is leading to respiratory problem amongst the men in charge of the project.

The price of one liter of gasoline in the besieged eastern Ghouta, in rural Damascus, varies between 2500-4000 Syrian Pounds.
The price of one liter of diesel is 2000 Syrian Pounds, which led the civilians to extract fuel from plastic, which caused the price of the liter to decrease to half the price.
The extracting method consists of putting the plastic in sealed barrels through which a water pipe to passes through for cooling purposes. Then a fire is lit underneath the barrels which allows the Methane to be released first, then gasoline, and finally diesel.
There are many types of extracted fuel and the determining factor for the type of fuel released is the type of plastic used.

SHOT LIST:
Various shots show the fuel extracting method.
Shots of the fire lit underneath the barrels, the cooling pipe, and the different types of plastic.
Obtaining diesel and fuel, which are similar in color, in addition to gas, which is not useful at the current time.
General shots of the stands where fuel is sold.

TRANSCRIPT:

Speakers: Abu Hassan, a plant owner
Nabil, owns a shop for selling fuel Abu Yasser, owns a shop for selling fuel

"Here we have the filtration process, we are turning fuel into diesel, and we are turing plastic into gasoline, diesel and oil. We are extracting gas for domestic use. The whole process is about boiling and filtering, from hot to cold. It is a basic procedure."

"One kilogram of plastic can produce 800 grams of liquid, gasoline and diesel."

"Gasoline reached the price of 4000-4200 Syrian Pounds ($20-$21), and the amounts available were minimal. However, we found a substitute by heating plastic and extracting methane, gasoline, and diesel."

"The price of diesel was 3200-3500 Syrian Pounds ($16-$18.50) per liter, which is considered very expensiv. So people were no longer able to purchase it, but after we started operating on plastic and started extracting diesel from it, the price decreased to 1200-1500 SP and it became more available."

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Zabbaleen: A life in Cairo's garbages
Zabbaleen
By Simon Letellier
11 Jul 2013

The Zabbaleen are teenagers and adults who have served as Cairo's informal garbage collectors for approximately the past 70 to 80 years. Zabbaleen means "Garbage people" in Egyptian Arabic. The Zabbaleen are also known as Zarraba, which means "pig-pen operators."

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Flip Flop Recycling
Mombassa, Kenya
By Ruud Elmendorp
29 May 2013

A Kenyan company based in Nairobi is recycling flip flops left on the beach in Mombosa and turning them into art and household beauties. This cultivation of used flip flops is helping in cleaning the beaches around the area and providing jobs for a lot of nationals.

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Garbage City (9 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic woman is walking pass a bridal store inside the slum.

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Garbage City (10 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic man is carrying on his back a pack of cartons before loeading it on a truck.

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Garbage City (11 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic man is filling his truck with animal carcasses.

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Garbage City (12 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic man is showing off his Christian tatoos.

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Garbage City (13 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic woman is going inside her home in an area where running water no longer works.

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Garbage City (14 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 23, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic man is pushing recycled plastic bottles onto a truck.

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Garbage City (16 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Copts are walking on a side street inside the slum.

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Garbage City (17 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A young Coptic girl is fixing her front porch inside the slum.

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Garbage City (18 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A young Muslim man is using a machine that makes parts for bread making machines sold to bakeries.

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Garbage City (19 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Muslim man who lives and works inside the slum owns a small shop that makes parts for bread making machines.

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Garbage City (20 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Minah and Anna both owned a plastic recycling shop.

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Garbage City (21 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 18, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic watch maker is working late inside his shop.

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Garbage City (22 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 20, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. Coptic priests are giving the Communion to locals inside the church of Sint Simon, built over 500 years ago.

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Garbage City (23 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 20, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic priest is helping a woman with some water inside the church of Sint Simon, built over 500 years ago.

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Garbage City (24 of 29)
Cairo, Egypt
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2013

March 20, 2013, Manshiyat Naser, Egypt. A Coptic man is picking up plastic bottles ready to be recycled.