Thumb sm
Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

Thumb sm
Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

Thumb sm
Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

Thumb sm
Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

Thumb sm
Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

Thumb sm
Beirut : Palestinian artist Samia Hal...
Beirut
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby poses at her expo "Five Decades of Painting and Innovation" at Beirut Exhibitions Center in Beirut, Lebanon on February 4, 2015. Photo by Ammar Abd Rabbo/Transterra Media

Frame 0004
Pioneer Artist Samia Halaby: “Abstrac...
Beirut
By PatrickAjemian
04 Feb 2015

Beirut, Lebanon

February 4, 2015

At the age of 79, Samia Halaby is one of the leading artists in the Arab world.
Halaby’s first retrospective exhibition, Samia Halaby: Five Decades of Painting and Innovation, currently held in Beirut, celebrates more than 70 of her artworks she has produced. Halaby wishes to hold similar retrospective exhibitions in different parts of the world. Her work is widely sought around by art collectors. One her paintings were sold at Christie’s auction house for $179,000.
As an international and Arab pioneer of abstraction, Halaby aims to place abstract painting within the reach of a very wide audience.
“People say that they do not understand abstract art,” she says. “Therefore, I give paintings titles to open the door for spectators to enter and see whatever they want.” Halaby has remained faithful to abstract painting throughout her long career because she believes it is “an image of nature.”
“While [Photography] builds a perspective using a lens, [abstract art] imitates nature without a lens,” Halaby adds. The Jerusalem-born artist’s work reflects her political and historical background. Her vast array of paintings includes a collection on olive trees, an icon of Palestinian culture and symbol of resistance. She has also written a book on the artistic representation of the Palestinian intifada and believes that it constitutes a distinct artistic school

Frame 0004
Pioneer Artist Samia Halaby: “Abstrac...
Biel
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Beirut, Lebanon

February 4, 2015

At the age of 79, Samia Halaby is one of the leading artists in the Arab world.
Halaby’s first retrospective exhibition, Samia Halaby: Five Decades of Painting and Innovation, currently held in Beirut, celebrates more than 70 of her artworks she has produced. Halaby wishes to hold similar retrospective exhibitions in different parts of the world. Her work is widely sought around by art collectors. One her paintings were sold at Christie’s auction house for $179,000.
As an international and Arab pioneer of abstraction, Halaby aims to place abstract painting within the reach of a very wide audience.
“People say that they do not understand abstract art,” she says. “Therefore, I give paintings titles to open the door for spectators to enter and see whatever they want.” Halaby has remained faithful to abstract painting throughout her long career because she believes it is “an image of nature.” “While [Photography] builds a perspective using a lens, [abstract art] imitates nature without a lens,” Halaby adds. The Jerusalem-born artist’s work reflects her political and historical background. Her vast array of paintings includes a collection on olive trees, an icon of Palestinian culture and symbol of resistance. She has also written a book on the artistic representation of the Palestinian intifada and believes that it constitutes a distinct artistic school.

Thumb sm
Trees of Protest in the West Bank
Beit Ummar
By Ibrahim Hamouz
02 Feb 2015

Palestinian villagers plant olive trees on land confiscated by Israeli settlers near the village of Beit Ummar in the occupied West Bank. The trees are a symbolic protest to ongoing Israeli policies of land confiscation and illegal Jewish settlement.

Frame 0004
Gaza Censors Books that “Harm Society”
Gaza
By Sami Ajrami
28 Jan 2015

Gaza, Palestine
January 28, 2015

Readers and researchers in Gaza Strip face a difficulty in accessing books that defy conservative Islamic norms. The director of Gaza’s municipal library Hassan Abu Ataya said that his staff avoid presenting books “that harm society” to the public. The library was founded in 1999 and contains about 25,000 books. However, it lacks basic academic references, especially in foreign languages. This lack also affects universities and often hinders the work of researchers and graduate students.
The owner of Yazigi bookstore, considered the largest in Gaza city, also said that his business provides books that abide by “our customs and traditions.” While books about Islam can be anywhere in Gaza, a customer at the bookstore said that it was very difficult to find books that discuss Marxist ideology.
Hamas is governed by the Islamist Hamas movement, which imposes conservative rules on society. In 2011, the ministry of culture banned several Arabic novels written by well-known writers, such as Egyptian novelist and essayist Alaa Aswani.

Shotlist
1- Wide of street , Gaza municipal library
2- Wide of Gaza municipal library building from outside
3- Various of bookshelves inside library
4- Close up of books
5- Wide of Hassan Abu Ataya organizing bookshelf

6- SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Hassan Abu Ataya, General director of Gaza’s municipal library

“Concerning censorship on books, we examine the titles and we also classify the books according to their content. Why should we have books that might harm society? They might not be suitable for people. There is another policy. Books that contain criticism or things that might conflict with Sharia law are stored aside and could be shown only to very specialized readers.”

7- Wide of Yazji Bookstore
8- Wide of woman (Amal al-Haj) walking into Yaziji Bookstore
9- Various of woman (Amal al-Haj) inside Yaziji Bookstore

10- SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Amal al-Haj, bookshop customer
01:59 – 02:28

“I noticed that more than a third of the books in this bookstore are religious books. There is also a large section for novels and poetry. Many things that interest specialists do not exist in the bookshop. Language books are almost completely missing from this bookstore, which is the largest in Gaza. Philosophy books and other references are also missing. It is difficult to find books written by Marx or Hegel. “

11- SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Hatem al-Yazigi, Owner of Yazigi Bookstore
02:29 – 02:41
“There is no censorship on books, but we try to provide books that suit our customs and traditions.” 12- Various of books displayed on the street
13- Wide of Al-Sairafi Bookshop façade
14- Wide of university bookshop

15- SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Muhannad al-Khairi, a resident of Gaza
03:19 – 03:42
“I brought about 20 or 30 books in a suitcase, including books that critique religious thought, atheism and similar topics. An officer at the border crossing objected that I had such a book. I had a very long argument with the officer. I was only able to convince him of letting me take the book inside Gaza after I told him that I also carried religious books with me.”

16- Various of library study hall and bookshelves. NAT Sound: Call for prayer.

17- SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Sakher Katkat, University Students
04:08 – 04:38
“I had a research assignment about Napoleon’s life for a class in the second year of sociology. I could not find the book that I needed. I had to change the entire topic, even though I was eager to learn Napoleon’s history. I said to my professor that the information can be found online, but he refused that I take any information from the Internet. He wanted me to use that book and include all the relevant information. I said, ‘How can I get this information?’ the professor then told me to change the topic.

18- SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Hani Habib, University Lecturer
04:39 – 05:24

“Palestinian universities do not have libraries that meet academic requirements. University libraries lack important sources required by master and PhD students. The same applies to references in Arabic, but this lack is prominent in foreign languages, especially German or French. There are some books in English, but their number is very limited and insufficient.”

Thumb sm
Pro-Hezbollah Rally in Gaza
Gaza Strip
By hosalem
26 Jan 2015

The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) holds a rally in Gaza in support of Lebanese Hezbollah movement. The rally was held as a show of solidarity with Hezbollah after one of their key figures was assassinated in an Israeli airstrike in the Syrian controlled Golan heights.

While no longer the formidable military organization it once was, the PFLP maintains a political role in Palestinian society and has strong ties with both Hezbollah and the Assad regime in Syria. 

Thumb sm
Palestinian and Israeli Activists Est...
Ziad Abu Ein
By Ibrahim Hamouz
24 Jan 2015

January 23, 2015 Palestinian and Israeli activists protest Israeli land confiscation and Jewish only settlement policies in the West Bank by establishing a new village on confiscated land. The village was named after killed Palestinian activist Ziad Abu Ein.

Thumb sm
Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehicles
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
21 Jan 2015

Like drones in the sky, unmanned armored remote control land vehicles are already seeing extensive action on the Israel-Gaza border. The Israeli Army is now the first and only Army in the world that uses these land drones in combat zones. The unmanned remote control vehicles come in two sizes and are armed with 0.5 Calibre Machine guns and other classified armoury. The vehicles are controlled and driven by IDF women operators only and patrol the border between Israel and the Hamas controlled Gaza strip, replacing manned patrols and saving lives and manpower. During the years they have been operational, the unmanned patrols have been attacked twice by IED`S and machine gunfire. They have discovered breaches in the border fence and chased down infiltrators. During the last 50 day war between Israel and Hamas, they carried out many missions, mostly suppllying fighting units with food and ammunition behind enemy lines. They also conducted surveillance operations. "This is the future of the modern combat field " says the commander of this unique unit.

Frame 0004
A Village Divided Between Lebanon and...
Dhaira
By wissam fanash
03 Jan 2015

Various elder residents of a Lebanese village on the border with Israel tell the story of how their village and families came to be divided by the creation of Israel in 1948. Part of the Aramsha clan, their lands included four of five villages that lay on both side of the future Lebanese-Israeli border prior to 1948. Today, they live in constant surveillance (a drone can be seen in the video) and are separated from their kin living in Israel by tank patrols, barbed wire and land mines. One resident speaks of how she lost her leg to a land mine laid by Israelis when attempting to attend her father's funeral on the other side of the border. Since she can no longer obtain a permit to visit her relatives, it has been 20 years since she last saw her family.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of Fakhri Fanash with grandchildren walking in garden
Various of Israeli armored vehicles driving along Israeli-Lebanese border

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Fakhri Fanash, Dignitary of Aramsha Clan
01:26 – 04:49

“We are part of the Aramsha clan, which live in about four or five villages. This is Dhaira; over there are the villages of Idmith, Iribbin and Jordeh. We are all cousins, brothers and relatives. The lands that can be seen within the occupied territories are ours. I can name them: over there is Safra, Bater, Jordeh, Jrad Moussa; this Khallet al-Adas or Khallet al-Saheb. All of these lands were ours. We were part of one tribe. The Israeli invasion, or colonialism, divided this land. Some people are here in Dhaira – about one quarter [of the clan] and three quarters stayed there. There were four brothers, two of whom stayed there and two came here.

After 1948, they [Israelis] started annexing lands and [planting] mines and barbed wires. They set up the land the way they wanted. They took this part of the land.
In the Lebanese part of these territories, which is still with us, there are landmines over there where these olive trees are planted.

Behind Jordeh there is a cemetery, called the Aramsha Cemetery. This was both ours and theirs. You see, when my grandfather died, people were crying. There was a Lebanese Army patrol to keep people apart. All of our relatives from Palestine came to the cemetery, but we were about two meters away from each other. When the Army saw that people were crying and concerned for each other, it allowed people from both sides to come together. There were no barbed wires or landmines in that spot. All people came together, and the funeral became like a wedding because people were able to reunite.

Look at that patrol [DRONE CAN BE SEEN IN THE SKY]. It goes on day and night. There are also armored vehicles and tanks. We have property deeds form the Ottoman era that prove [our ownership over] the land that you can see in front of you, which is vast. We have documents written by the notary of Acre. During peace negotiations between Lebanon and the Israeli enemy, the ministry of foreign affairs asked us to present these papers, which we did. Afterwards, things went bad among Arab countries and we did not get anything from this.”

Wide of Israeli patrol
Wide/ zoom out of Fakhri Fanash’s grandchildren watch Israeli armored vehicle on other side of the border.
Various of Khairiya al-Moghais walking

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Khairiya al-Moghais, Aramsha Clan Member

05: 14 – 09:05

“This is my sister [SHOWING PHOTOS]. These are my brother and his wife. This is also my brother and his wife. And this is my daughter.

It has been about 20 years. I used to visit them before, using a permit. Now I cannot go anywhere. I have not seen her for 20 years. This is also my brother. This is my daughter and this is my other daughter. When I see [their photo] I cry. I wish I could meet them.

I left my parents and ran away to Lebanon when I met my husband. I stayed at my sister’s, and then they took me to Beirut. I was sentenced to one month [in prison].

I have not seen my parents for 40 years.

Interviewer: Are you not communicating with them?
- No Interviewer: You do not know what is happening to them either?
- No, no. They forbid them… we used to shout to each other, but since the liberation we have not dared to talk to them. They do not dare to talk with us either.
Interviewer: Who is preventing you from doing that?
- We are scared. We are scared here. We do not dare. And over there, [Israeli] patrols guard the barbed wire.

I once heard an announcement over the loud speaker coming from the village of Jordeh. I thought my father died. I stepped on a wire. I was not thinking of the wire, I was only thinking of my father. I heard a sound and I thought I had stepped on a metal can. I did not realize it was a landmine. I walked a bit further and the landmine went off. I fell on the ground. I saw that my leg was cut off. I started to scream and people came in a hurry from Dhaira and from the other side, but people could not talk to each other.

I was lying in the middle; Israel was on this side and Lebanon on the other. Then they carried me away.

I stayed on the floor. I then extended my hand to a soldier from a patrol because I was in a lot of pain. I wanted him to lift me. He waved his hand as if to say “no.” They removed the landmines then took me in an ambulance.

I wish I could see my family and daughters before I… Then, I would not care if I died… All my relatives and family… we were all living together happily. Nobody did anything to us. This is our life.”

Wide of Israeli military post
Wide/ traveling of Israeli Humvee driving on other side of border
Wide of United Nation border demarcation barrel
Wide of territory across barbed wires
Various of landmine warning signs
Close up of flour/ demarcation barrel in background
Wide of car moving on other side of the Israeli border
Wide of Israeli military post
Various of landmine warning signs and border fence
Traveling of Jordeh, a village inhabited by Aramsha clan and held by Israel
Various of Israeli military transmission tower
Traveling of United Nations helicopter
Traveling of village Mazraat al-Aramsha, a village inhabited by Aramsha clan and controlled by Israel
Wide of woman walking by border fence on the Israeli side
Various of trees
Wide of houses on Israeli side of the border
Wide of children and cattle on Israeli side of border
Wide of landmine warning sign
Various of children on side of border

NAT Sound (Arabic) conversation across the border
-We are from Palestine. - What is your name? -Mohammad. - Mohammad what? -[UNINTELLIGIBLE] -Mohammad what? -Mohammad Jomaa. We are Arabs, not Jews. - Who are you? -Ahmad -Omar, Ali, Ahmad, Hammoudi, Lyn”

Children on Lebanese side waving the Palestinian flag.
Wide of Israeli Humvee driving by

Frame 0004
Ground Zero: The Tug of War over Jeru...
Jerusalem, Israel
By Jonathan Giesen
28 Dec 2014

As tensions in Jerusalem boil over into open conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, the issue of the Al-Aqsa Mosque complex remains one of the key issues in the conflict. This story explores the cultural and religious significance of the complex to the two sides and illustrates how the area has yet again become a catalyst for violence. Some fear this newest round of violence may lead to a third Palestinian Intifada.

Frame 0004
After the Punishment: Home Demolition...
Silwan
By Ibrahim Husseini
24 Dec 2014

In Jerusalem, the Israeli Army has been destroying the family homes of militants as a form of collective punishment. This story explores what happens to those families after they have lost their home.

Article:

Text by Youssef Zbib

In October, 21-year-old Abdel Rahman Shalodi drove his car into a light rail train station on a line that connects Israeli settlements in Jerusalem. He killed a baby and a woman from Ecuador and wounded at least seven other people. This act was part of a recent series of attacks against Israelis, fueled in part by a religious conflict over the ownership of the holy site that Israelis call the Temple Mount and to which Palestinians refer as the Noble Sanctuary.
In retaliation for the attack, the Israeli government ordered the destruction of the Shalodi family’s apartment unit, located in the Silwan neighborhood near the disputed old center of Jerusalem. His mother, father and five siblings, are now without a home.

"Right now we are living in my brother-in-law’s apartment. He is in Jordan now and will come back in five months,” said Enas Shalodi, Abdel Rahman’s 43-year-old mother.

“We can only use the living room and one bedroom in the apartment in which we are staying, so the situation is a little difficult. Some of my children sleep at their grandmother's and some sleep here," she added.

The Israeli police have not left the family alone since the demolition. Police officers interrupted a reporter’s interview with Enas to inspect the apartment, something which has happened repeatedly since the family moved into their temporary residence.
“They came here when we moved in and said that we are not allowed to stay. [They show up whenever] a reporter comes here,”Enas said while her teenage daughter Nebras spoke with the police officers.

“The [Israeli police] are also threatening to demolish the home where we are staying now, which belongs to my brother-in-law (…) Since the demolition, approximately 34 days ago, they broke in here about 10 times,” Enas said.

Enas’s daughter Nebras finds it hard to deal with the family’s difficult circumstances.
“We have no computer, no TV, no devices and the house is too small. It is not enough," Nebras said.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) has labeled the demolition of the family homes of militants as a “war crime.”
“Justifying punishment of people who are not responsible for a criminal act just because they might ‘support’ it would set a dangerous precedent which could come back to haunt Israelis,” reads a statement issued by HRW in November 2014. Israeli critics of this policy, on the other hand, argue that it is ineffective because, as figures show, the number of attacks by Palestinians against Israel increases following house demolitions.

Demolition to expand settlements

In addition to demolishing homes as a punitive measure, Israeli authorities also destroy Palestinian homes built without a permit. Palestinians in the West Bank, however, usually cannot obtain such permits even if they apply for them.
According to the pro-peace Israeli monitoring group B’Tselem, Israel has demolished 545 houses that belong to Palestinians in east Jerusalem between 2004 and 2014. This has made 2,115 people homeless. Some people take down their homes with their own hands in order to avoid paying demolition charges to Israeli authorities, according to the organization’s official website.
The Zeer family, made up of a mother, a father and five children, now lives in a cave after Israeli authorities razed their house twice, without giving them a clear explanation.
“Sometimes they [Israeli authorities] claim that this is an agricultural area. At other times they claim that we do not a have a [building] permit,” said 40-year-old Khalid al-Zeer. “It seems that they want to uproot us and ethnically cleanse the original inhabitants from this land and move in settlers that they have gathered from around the world.” The small community of Israeli settlers in Silwan has recently expanded as dozens of them moved into the neighborhood in October, with the help of a right-wing organization called Ateret Kohanim that promotes Jewish settlement in east Jerusalem. The organization considers this influx a legitimate return to a village established by Yemenite Jews in the 1880s known in Hebrew as Kfar Hashiloah, which disappeared in the 1920s.
Eli Hazan, a member of the Israeli Likud party, defended his government’s policy of building settlements in the West Bank.
“We are going to stay in [the West Bank], therefore we are going to build in these places,” Hazan said. “We remember what happened from 1948 to 1967. Jews could not go to East Jerusalem. They could not go to the Western Wall and Mount of Olives.”

From the Palestinian point of view, however, this will only lead to more grief.

“This suffering and the suffering of every Jerusalemite will not be over until the end of the occupation,” said Enas Shalodi.

Frame 0004
After the Punishment: Home Demolition...
Jerusalem
By Ibrahim Husseini
21 Dec 2014

Silwan, East Jerusalem, Palestinian Territories

December 23, 2014

Enas Shalodi is a 43-year-old mother of five children who lives in Silwan, a densely populated and poor suburb south of Jerusalem.
The Israeli military demolished Shalodi’s house in November at the orders of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s after her oldest son, 21-year-old Abdel Rahman, drove his car into a light train in Jerusalem, killing a three month old baby and a 21-year-old woman from Ecuador. Abdul Rahman was shot on the scene, and later died of his wounds.
Critics say the demolition of the family's home is a pure act of vengeance and a case in point of a double-standard policy practiced by Israel. The homes belonging to the killers of Mohammad Abu Khdair, a Palestinian teenager who was kidnapped and beaten to death in July by Israeli settlers, were not demolished.
Abdul Rahman Shalodi was previously jailed for 16 months on counts of throwing rocks at Israelis, according to Enas. He was released in December 2012. Following his release, he was arrested several times for short periods of time without being charged. The Shabak, Israel's internal security service, regularly called him and pressured him to collaborate with it, Enas said, then “he started to have psychological problems."
This video aims to shed light on the struggle of a Palestinian family in one of Jerusalem's toughest neighborhoods.
Israeli policemen interrupted the interview with Enas Shanodi when the suddenly arrived to inspect the building where she is staying with her children. She says that the police have raided this building at least 10 times.
Silwan, adjacent to the Noble Sanctuary which houses the Al-Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of the Rock, is a target for hardline Jewish groups who are trying to settle in Palestinian neighborhoods in east Jerusalem. The neighborhood is often the site of heavy clashes between Palestinian youth and Israeli security, which usually end with the arrest of young Palestinians.
Archaeological excavations in Silwan are also an unsettling factor. Israel is carrying them out in order to prove that Jerusalem has a Jewish origin. Palestinians say these excavations often result in confiscating their lands and denying them the right to build homes.

Shot List

Shot List

1 Various of Jerusalem
2 Various of Israeli police troops on the streets
3 Wide of street
4 Medium of banner with logo of Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine commemorating Abdel Rahman Shalodi as a martyr
5 Wide of street where Enas Shalodi lives. Graffiti “Palestina Libre!! Argentina” (Free Palestine!! Argentina)
6 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Enas Shalodi

“Ten days before the demolition, when they [Israeli police] came and took measurements of the house, we knew they were going to demolish [it]. We removed all the furniture and the children’s belongings.

“Here, we live in the Shalodi building, which belongs to my husband’s brothers. We transported all of our furniture to the building and put them in seven apartments.

"Right now we are living in my brother-in-law’s apartment. He is in Jordan now and will come back in five months. We are staying in his place and our furniture is stored in seven other apartments that belong to my brothers-in-law and my mother-in-law. We can only use the living room and one bedroom in the apartment in which we are staying, so the situation is a little difficult. Some of my children sleep at their grandmother's and some sleep here…"

[A young man’s voice]: "The police are here"

"They are here"

“The police are here"

Enas: They came? Who came? The police are here!

[Conversation among police officers in Hebrew.]

7 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Enas Shalodi
“They came here when we moved in and said that we are not allowed to stay. [They show up whenever] a reporter comes here.

“Also, no one had lived in my brother-in-law’s apartment for a year and a half. We were fixing it. Whenever we brought something to the [apartment], they [Israeli police] would immediately come and say: ‘You cannot repair the [apartment].’ They [Israeli police] also told us that we cannot stay in my brother-in-law’s apartment. They [Israeli police] are also threatening us to demolish the home where we are staying now, which belongs to my brother in law. They [Israeli police] came here last night at 8 pm. Last week they came here on four days: Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The week before, they came on Sunday. Since the demolition, approximately 34 days ago, they broke in here about 10 times.”

8 Various of Enas Shalodi’s demolished house
9 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Enas Shalodi

“I do not know, ending the occupation! I mean this suffering will not end and the suffering of every Jerusalemite will not end until the occupation ends.

10 Various of Enas Shalodi’s demolished house

“If we receive aid from benefactors or any international organizations, we will buy a house or a small apartment because we cannot afford to buy a house [on our own] right now. Two [of my children] are studying in the university and three in school and my husband is a humble worker. He works at a car wash station owned by Jews. So his income is barely enough to pay daily expenses. Add to that our kids university tuition costs a lot. We cannot save to buy a home and pay for their tuition. So we are asking help from the organizations. They all promised help but we have not received any."

11 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Teenage girl) Nebras, Enas Shalodi's daughter

“We have no computer, no TV, no devices and the house is too small. It is not enough."

12 Various of Knesset, the Israeli Parliament, West Jerusalem
13 SOUNDBITE (English with Hebrew accent, Man) Likud Party member
“I think that me and you, we have a disagreement. There are some territories which you consider to be Palestinian and I consider to be Israeli. For instance, East Jerusalem, Gush Etzion, Ariel, and what we call the settlement block.

“We want to make it real. We are going to stay in these places, therefore we are going to build in these places. We remember what happened from 1948 to 1967. Jews could not go to East Jerusalem. They could not go to the Western Wall and Mount of Olives.

“We want to protect ourselves. This is why we are doing that. Now, besides, that, we have a dispute in Israel itself -- whether to build in other places in the territories. We are trying to manage this dispute. We don’t fully agree inside Israel, but we are making our best.”

14 Various of settlement
15 SOUNDBITE (English with Hebrew accent, Man) Likud Party member

“We are willing to deal with it. We remember what happened [in] every territory that Israel pulled out of. If you remember, we pulled out in 1993 from territories and we got terror. We pulled out in the year 2000 from South Lebanon, and we got terror. We pulled out of Gaza, completely, in the year 2005, and we got terror.

“We are only asking to protect ourselves. Besides that, do not forget that even before; we came into the territories in 1967 and we were under criticism.”

16 Various of separation wall
17 SOUNDBITE (English with Hebrew accent, Man) Eli Hazan, Likud Party member

“Personally, I accept the two-state solution of Benjamin Netanyahu from (…) June 2009, which says that (…) Jerusalem will be united under Israeli sovereignty. We are under the settlement block in Jerusalem in Gosh Etzion and Ariel and the recognition by Palestinians [of] the Israeli State. That is the solution for me and my point of view.”

18 Various of settlements

Frame 0004
Syrian Palestinian Refugees Risk thei...
Beirut, Lebanon
By wissam fanash
18 Dec 2014

Beirut, Lebanon

December 15, 2014

The humanitarian situation in Syria continues to deteriorate as the war there nears its fourth year. Palestinian refugees in Syria fled war and malnutrition in the besieged Yarmouk camp near Damascus and moved to Shatila camp near Beirut. But conditions in their new host country were far from what they had hoped for.

Palestinian refugees whose families arrived to Lebanon in 1948 already struggle with unemployment and poverty and the newcomers did not fare any better.

For many, the only solution was to pay huge amounts of money to smugglers who promise to take them illicitly to Europe by sea or across the African desert. Most of them, however, disappear or get caught by authorities in transit countries.

This video tells the story of people whose family members already took the dangerous road to Europe but did not make it.

The video also features a Skype call between a Palestinian refugee who wishes to travel illicitly to Italy and a people smuggler who says he is based in Sudan. The smuggler gives all the details about going from Lebanon to Sudan, and then across the desert to Libya before being smuggled by sea to Italy.

Shot List

1 M/S and W/S of the streets

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, woman) Siham Jumaa

(00:07) He met a smuggler through Sudan who helped him prepare a visit to Sudan. He booked on a flight (Transit) from Beirut Airport (00:13).

(00:14) When he arrived to Sudan he called me to tell me that he is safe, and he is going to Libya after. He arrived safely to Libya after three days in the desert. After that, I got no news from him, and it has been three months now (00:28).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Skype between Palestinian refugee Ibrahim al-Khatib and a people smuggler in Sudan.

(00:29) We have the path of Sudan, a bit cheap, but dangerous (00:34).

(00:36) You have to spend five to seven days in the desert and face many risks. You might face kidnappers or robbers. We cannot control these things; this is a matter of destiny. You will have to count on God if you want to take that road. In all cases, there is not any other road (00:59).

(01:00) We charge $3,200 for the trip from Sudan all the way to Italy (01:07).

Frame 0004
Rock Climbing in Palestine
Ein Qinia
By Ibrahim Husseini
05 Dec 2014

Rock climbing is an emerging sport in the occupied Palestinian territories. Two American climbers with the help of an Italian climber are bolting rocks and teaching Palestinians how to rock climb.

The following footage was taken in Ein Qinia, near Ramallah, on Friday December 5, 2014.

This location was picked by Tim and Will for at least two important reasons. The first is because the rock is suitable for bolting and climbing and also makes a challenging climb. The second reason is the geographical location. The proximity of Ein Qinya village to Ramallah makes it unlikely for Israeli settlers to venture in. There are other climbing areas in the OPT but they are close to Israeli settlements and therefore are avoided by Palestinian climbers for fear of getting in trouble with the settlements guards and the Israeli army. Hundreds of Israeli checkpoints across the OPT makes movement a nightmare to Palestinians. Lack of outdoor recreation in Palestine makes climbing attractive to Palestinians and contribute to the overall quality of life for those who value outdoor activities.

More about Tim and Will (taken from the wadiclimbing.com website)

Timothy Bruns was a Political Science major and Arabic Language minor at Colorado College and is deeply interested in development in Palestine. Tim has been rock climbing for many years. He has extensive experience teaching hard skills, technique, and rope skills. He has built rock-climbing walls in the U.S. and is helping to construct an expansion at a local Colorado climbing gym. Tim is a certified lead climber and Wilderness First Responder. Additionally, he has spent past summers working with children and teenagers; leading wilderness trips in New Hampshire and North Carolina and working at a leadership camp with Palestinian youth in Maine.
Will Harris was a Colorado College Economics and Business major, Arabic Language minor and is an accomplished athlete. Will loves rock climbing and worked part time at a local Colorado rock climbing gym. He has devoted his academic career to business development in the Middle East and wrote his thesis on foreign direct investment in Jordan, where he spent four months living and studying.

1st Interview: Nour Awad. Palestinian climber.
2nd Interview: Timothy Bruns- Wadi Climbing Co-Founder
3rd Interview: Wael Hassouneh. Palestinian climber
4th Interview: Victor
5th Interview: Will Harris. Wadi Climbing Co- Founder
6th Interview: Dario Franchetti. Climber & adviser to Wadi Climbing. Italy. Works and lives in the OPT
7th Interview: Edmee Van Rijn. Climber. Holland.Works and lives in the OPT.

Frame 0004
Al Aqsa and the Conflict in Jerusalem
Jerusalem, Israel
By Iliay
27 Nov 2014

November 2014
Jerusalem

As tensions in Jerusalem boil over into open conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, the issue of the Al-Aqsa Mosque complex remains one of the key issues in the conflict. This story explores the cultural and religious significance of the complex to the two sides and illustrates how the area has yet again become a catalyst for violence. Some fear this newest round of violence may lead to a third Palestinian Intifada.

Frame 0004
Egypt Widens Gaza Buffer Zone, Homes ...
Rafah
By TTM Mena Desk
20 Nov 2014

November 20, 2014
Rafah, Egypt

The video shows buildings being blown up, destroyed homes and abandoned tunnels in Rafah on the Egyptian-Palestinian border.
80 year old sheikh Omar, a resident of the town, cries over the loss of his home.

Egypt’s cabinet issued a decision on October 29 to create a “buffer zone” in Rafah, North Sinai, on the country’s Eastern border with the Palestinian Gaza Strip. The decision aimed to clear 500 meters of the border area with Gaza of civilians. On Monday, November 17, the Egyptian authorities decided to double the depth of the “buffer zone” to 1,000 meters.

On Wednesday, November 19, a North Sinai official told the state-owned Middle East News Agency, MENA, that Egypt’s armed forces have so far destroyed 700 houses to create the “buffer zone” adding that the remaining houses in the area will be destroyed within the coming few days. The official said that the government has so far paid around 63 million Egyptian pounds in compensation to displaced Rafah residents.

The Egyptian authorities decided to create a "buffer zone" as one of the steps taken in response to militant attacks on security personnel in northern Sinai on October 24, which left over 33 killed.

Transcription:

Cameraman:
00:27 Is this your house?

Omar, Resident of Rafah:
00:30 Why do you think I am crying then? I am crying for the life I just lost.

00:40 May God be with us

00:46 We are leaving behind a whole era, and now they are slaughtering me. There is no power but of God.

01:10 Thanks be to God. I have nothing left.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 12
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The straw and mud structure of the school is not solid. Inside the classrooms, the walls have been starting to fall apart.

While lack of funds is one reason for the poor structure of the school, the other major factor is an Israeli law banning the use of cement for construction by Palestinians in Area C of the West Bank. The school is located in Area C, which is the part of the West Bank under total Israeli military control.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 07
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The school of Khan Al-Ahmar has classes from grades 1 to 9. Children from five different Bedouin communities attend classes there. Every year, their number grows. There were 120 children for the 2013-2014 school year. In September 2014, 146 came to register.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 08
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

English class for 3rd grade children. All the children are eager to learn. They want to keep studying after the 9th grade, and often want to become doctor or lawyers because there are no medical or legal services in their community. While medical services are a basic essential for any community, legal services are significant to the West Bank Bedouin because they need lawyers to help them battle eviction orders from Israeli courts and the Israeli Army.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 01
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014.
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine.

Teachers run in the rain between their classrooms and the "teachers room" to bring handouts for their students.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 10
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Children in the 8th grade studying, with the shape of the tires appearing in the wall. The goal of many of the students is often to enter into a profession that is not represented in their community, like medical or legal.

Every year the school administration goes to court in order to postpone the demolition of the institution. So far, they have managed to avoid a final demolition, but the orders remain, and it is uncertain how much longer the school will remain.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 04
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Among the classrooms built of soil and rubber tires, two are built of sheet metal. These more sturdy structures are sponsored by the European Union. The State of Israel did not authorize their construction and, as a consequence, they are hidden under tents and tarps.

When materials are donated by foreign donors, like the European Union, they are still at risk of confiscation by Israeli authorities when they are shipped into the area. In February of 2014, Italy donated playground equipment. However, the entire shipment was confiscated by the Israeli Army and materials never made it to the school.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 13
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Every time it rains, the classrooms get wet and humid, and the water leaks into where the students sit. There is also no heater for the cold winter of the desert.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 11
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Harema Zhaeqq is the headmaster of the school. She is highly respected by the teachers, as they say that she is always able to find the necessary furniture for the classes, by canvassing companies in Palestine and abroad. Some companies in Palestine are hesitant to donate, because they fear sanctions from Israel. However, Ms. Zhaeqq is usually able to convince them anyway. Here, she stands beside the supplies for science classes.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 09
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

English class. The children study with bowls on the tables to capture the rain falling into the classrooms.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 05
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Two young girls are go to class amidst murals used to add color to the otherwise mundane surroundings.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 03
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Children have to buy their notebooks and school supplies themselves. However, when a family is too poor to pay for school supplies, the teachers gather money to cover the child's expenses.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 02
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Recreation time at the school. A young boy strikes a pose for the camera.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 15
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

A young student runs back to class after playtime. The recreation area is muddy and wet due to heavy rain. The teachers wish the children could have a better space to play in because the ground is not suitable for child recreation.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 14
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The school playground for the Bedouin children of Khan Al-Ahmar is built of tires, mud, and other scrap materials.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 06
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Signs are made visible outside of the classrooms to thank the public sponsors of the school. While thankful for the funds, the headmaster pointed out that funds are limited and they only receive funds from the European Union and Italy.

Thumb sm
Palestine: When a School is Illegal
Khan al-Ahmar
By Vinciane Jacquet
14 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan al Ahmar, West Bank, Palestine

The Khan al-Ahmar School serves the children of the Jahalin Bedouin community in the West Bank and has been declared illegal by Israeli authorities. It is now facing possible demolition. Built in 2009, the school was constructed with mud and tires due to a lack of funds and an Israeli law that bans Palestinians in Area C of the West Bank from building structures made of cement. The children now attend school in poorly equipped classrooms with no heating, leaking ceilings, and little electricity. However, it is possible that even this primitive learning environment could be snatched from them at a moment's notice. Over 140 students are currently enrolled in the school. The nearest alternative school is located about 45 minutes away by car. The school's imminent demolition is part of a plan by Israeli authorities to displace the Jahalin Bedouin living in "Area C" of the occupied West Bank. The Khan Al-Ahmar School and Bedouin community is located in the Jerusalem periphery, between the Israeli settlements of Ma'ale Adumim and Kfar Adumim. While the Jahalin Bedouin have a longstanding presence in this area (they settled in the area in 1948, after being evicted by Israel from their lands in the Negev desert), the community and school present an obstacle to Israel's planned settlement expansion and construction of the separation barrier. The community lives with the constant threat of displacement. Every year, the school administration goes to court in order to postpone the planned demolition of the school. This year they were lucky and the court sided with them. However, the order still stands and next year they may not be so lucky.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The men of Al Araqib pray. They say they want a normal life, and they just want to make their area beautiful. "The government just wants to gather the maximum of Arabs in the minimum of land. But we have our history here. We won't leave".