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No Tobacco Day In Pakistan
Karachi, Pakistan
By U.S. Editor
31 May 2013

Each year May 31 is observed as World No Tobacco Day (WNTD), with the aim to spread awareness about the pitfalls of tobacco consumption. Tobacco use is one of the biggest public health threats the world has faced to date. May 31, 2013, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Almost 2,500 people die in Pakistan daily due to consumption of tobacco and smoking. Many people suffer from asthma and bronchitis, in addition to the more severe cases of cancer and heart attacks.

Tobacco use is rising in Pakistan, with about 30.7 percent of men estimated to be smokers, Pakistan stands at the brink of a devastating health and economic disaster. The steep rise in the use of tobacco amongst youth, especially young girls and women, is depriving the country of a healthy workforce, while increasing the burden of disease on an already overburdened health sector.

The fact that approximately 1,200 children start smoking daily represents a huge health and economic disaster.

Individuals who smoke cigarettes are 12 times more likely to die from lung cancer, two to four times more likely to develop coronary heart disease, twice as likely to have a stroke, and 10 times more likely to die from chronic obstructive lung disease.

Although many people are aware of the health issues associated with smoking, they are unable to quit due to nicotine addiction. However, willpower and personal determination to break free from the addiction play the most crucial role.

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No Tobacco Day in Pakistan (6 of 6)
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
31 May 2013

Each year May 31 is observed as World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) with the aim to spread awareness about the ills of tobacco consumption. Tobacco use is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced. May 31, 2013, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Almost 2,500 people die in Pakistan daily due to consumption of tobacco and smoking. Many people suffer from asthma and bronchitis, in addition to than cancer and heart attacks.

Tobacco use is rising in Pakistan, with about 30.7 per cent of men estimated to be smokers, Pakistan stands at the brink of a devastating health and economic disaster. The steep rise in the use of tobacco amongst the youth, especially young girls and women is depriving the country of a healthy workforce while increasing the burden of disease on an already overburdened health sector.
The fact that approximately 1,200 children start smoking daily represents a huge health and economic impact.
Individuals who smoke cigarettes are 12 times more likely to die from lung cancer, two to four times more likely to develop coronary heart disease, twice as likely to have a stroke, and 10 times more likely to die from chronic obstructive lung disease.
Although many people are aware of health issues involved in smoking, they are unable to quit due to nicotine addiction. However, willpower and personal determination to break free from the addiction play the most crucial role.

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No Tobacco Day in Pakistan (5 of 6)
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
31 May 2013

Each year May 31 is observed as World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) with the aim to spread awareness about the ills of tobacco consumption. Tobacco use is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced. May 31, 2013, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Almost 2,500 people die in Pakistan daily due to consumption of tobacco and smoking. Many people suffer from asthma and bronchitis, in addition to than cancer and heart attacks.

Tobacco use is rising in Pakistan, with about 30.7 per cent of men estimated to be smokers, Pakistan stands at the brink of a devastating health and economic disaster. The steep rise in the use of tobacco amongst the youth, especially young girls and women is depriving the country of a healthy workforce while increasing the burden of disease on an already overburdened health sector.
The fact that approximately 1,200 children start smoking daily represents a huge health and economic impact.
Individuals who smoke cigarettes are 12 times more likely to die from lung cancer, two to four times more likely to develop coronary heart disease, twice as likely to have a stroke, and 10 times more likely to die from chronic obstructive lung disease.
Although many people are aware of health issues involved in smoking, they are unable to quit due to nicotine addiction. However, willpower and personal determination to break free from the addiction play the most crucial role.

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No Tobacco Day in Pakistan (4 of 6)
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
31 May 2013

Each year May 31 is observed as World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) with the aim to spread awareness about the ills of tobacco consumption. Tobacco use is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced. May 31, 2013, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Almost 2,500 people die in Pakistan daily due to consumption of tobacco and smoking. Many people suffer from asthma and bronchitis, in addition to than cancer and heart attacks.

Tobacco use is rising in Pakistan, with about 30.7 per cent of men estimated to be smokers, Pakistan stands at the brink of a devastating health and economic disaster. The steep rise in the use of tobacco amongst the youth, especially young girls and women is depriving the country of a healthy workforce while increasing the burden of disease on an already overburdened health sector.
The fact that approximately 1,200 children start smoking daily represents a huge health and economic impact.
Individuals who smoke cigarettes are 12 times more likely to die from lung cancer, two to four times more likely to develop coronary heart disease, twice as likely to have a stroke, and 10 times more likely to die from chronic obstructive lung disease.
Although many people are aware of health issues involved in smoking, they are unable to quit due to nicotine addiction. However, willpower and personal determination to break free from the addiction play the most crucial role.

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No Tobacco Day in Pakistan (3 of 6)
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
31 May 2013

Each year May 31 is observed as World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) with the aim to spread awareness about the ills of tobacco consumption. Tobacco use is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced. May 31, 2013, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Almost 2,500 people die in Pakistan daily due to consumption of tobacco and smoking. Many people suffer from asthma and bronchitis, in addition to than cancer and heart attacks.

Tobacco use is rising in Pakistan, with about 30.7 per cent of men estimated to be smokers, Pakistan stands at the brink of a devastating health and economic disaster. The steep rise in the use of tobacco amongst the youth, especially young girls and women is depriving the country of a healthy workforce while increasing the burden of disease on an already overburdened health sector.
The fact that approximately 1,200 children start smoking daily represents a huge health and economic impact.
Individuals who smoke cigarettes are 12 times more likely to die from lung cancer, two to four times more likely to develop coronary heart disease, twice as likely to have a stroke, and 10 times more likely to die from chronic obstructive lung disease.
Although many people are aware of health issues involved in smoking, they are unable to quit due to nicotine addiction. However, willpower and personal determination to break free from the addiction play the most crucial role.

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No Tobacco Day in Pakistan (2 of 6)
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
31 May 2013

Each year May 31 is observed as World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) with the aim to spread awareness about the ills of tobacco consumption. Tobacco use is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced. May 31, 2013, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Almost 2,500 people die in Pakistan daily due to consumption of tobacco and smoking. Many people suffer from asthma and bronchitis, in addition to than cancer and heart attacks.

Tobacco use is rising in Pakistan, with about 30.7 per cent of men estimated to be smokers, Pakistan stands at the brink of a devastating health and economic disaster. The steep rise in the use of tobacco amongst the youth, especially young girls and women is depriving the country of a healthy workforce while increasing the burden of disease on an already overburdened health sector.
The fact that approximately 1,200 children start smoking daily represents a huge health and economic impact.
Individuals who smoke cigarettes are 12 times more likely to die from lung cancer, two to four times more likely to develop coronary heart disease, twice as likely to have a stroke, and 10 times more likely to die from chronic obstructive lung disease.
Although many people are aware of health issues involved in smoking, they are unable to quit due to nicotine addiction. However, willpower and personal determination to break free from the addiction play the most crucial role.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib Province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Child infected by leishmania, a skin disease that is passed on by an insect that looks like a big mosquito and is devastating this rural region. It provokes red stings which attack the skin. Before the revolution, an insecticide was spread in order to kill the insect. No humanitarian organization is supporting the sick people.
Un enfant atteint de la leishmaniose. Cette maladie de peau transmise par un insecte ressemblant à un gros moustique fait des ravages dans cette région rurale. Il provoque des boutons qui rongent la peau. Avant la révolution, un insecticide était diffusé pour éradiquer l'insecte. Aucune organisation humanitaire ne vient en aide aux malades.

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

They are washing the soil, day and night, hoping that it hides gold. Seventy to eighty percent of all prospectors arrive illegally from the neighboring country of Zimbabwe. The nuggets, belonging to the state, end up in the hands of Nigerian, Somalian, Zimbabwean, Israeli and Lebanese merchants. The state is left with the ground and river water no more suitable for drinking nor watering, along with the treatment of the gold diggers' damaged health. Gold rush in Manica, in the heart of Mozambique.

They build artificial bases and dams at the river bank where they wash the soil day and night to find the gold.