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Elephants being chased by Maasai comm...
ilpolei
By Sonyanga Weblen
10 Aug 2016

This is a video of elephants being chased away from the homesteads by the villagers in a Maasai Community, the elephants dominate most of the areas around the homesteads, and preventing the residents from performing their day today activities, in the past we didn't see elephants approaching the homesteads, we use to graze our cattle almost together with the wild animals peacefully, but now we are having elephants visiting our homesteads and this is very risky and many people were killed by elephants, Human-wildlife conflict, the elephants destroys a lot of farmers crops and they even kill the cattle and goats if they come across.
This raw video shows the real situation down here in our village. What is happening here is that the villagers are chasing the elephants away, someone was hooting from their motorbike (Boda boda) to scare the elephants away. With the growth of industrialization, then we will have more cases of human-wildlife conflicts.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 01
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

The female elephant Mosha with her Mahout.
The conductor often spends his life with the elephant and earns his life with it.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 02
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

The FAE Hospital was set up in 1993. It is the first in the world. Donations from the public and different institutions throughout the world help cover the high costs.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 03
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

The hospital founder, Soraida Salwala, taking care of Mosha while the doctor take a mold of her foot.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 04
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Motala was the first elephant who arrived at the hospital with a landmine injury in 1999. News of her injury drew international attention and raised enough donations for FAE to develop a strategy on how to treat elephant landmine victims.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 05
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Mosha's and Motala's casts for the new prosthetic limbs that will be developed by the team of doctor Derrick Campana, CEO of Animal Orthocare in Virginia, USA.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 06
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Soraida Salwala whispers to the elephants of her hospital as if they were her own kids.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 07
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Dr Derrick Campana and the vets from FAE cover Mosha's limb with fiberglass gauzes to create the cast for the mold of her new prosthesis.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 08
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Mosha and her mahout relax after the vets made her cast. The white powder still on her body.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 09
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

A local assistant helps Dr Derrick Campana writing technical infos on the new cast.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 10
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Motala is now 55 years old. She is the old lady of the hospital and is highly respected by other elephants of the FAE centre.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 11
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Vets and assistants fit Mosha with her old artificial limb she will still use until she gets the new one.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 12
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Elephants are the biggest animals Dr Derrick Campana has created an artificial limb for. He worked on llamas, cows and all kind of pets before.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 13
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Mosha walks with her old artificial limb. She was only 7 months old when she stepped on a landmine. After surgey at the hospital she still could not walk and let herself fall into depression. The new limb brought her back to life.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 14
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

The hospital founder Soraida Salwala walking around the hospital and showing the facilities to some guests.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 15
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

FAE hospital provides free medical care elephants with a wide range of problems: from gunshot wounds to drug addiction for those elephants who have been exploited in the illegal logging industry.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 16
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Boy is 26 and has spent his last 16 years with Faa, a female elephant. Together they work in a camp and teach other mahouts how to conduct these animals.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 17
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

The FAE centre provides care, accommodation and food to the mahouts. Usually, the treatments last for longtime and elephants and conductors have to spend long periods of time at the Hospital, far from their homes.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 18
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

A worker is preparing the food for on Elephant at the Lampang hospital. Managment costs of the hospital, including treatments and food for the animals, are around US$ 30,000 per month.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 19
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Through the years, many vet students from Chiang Mai University have come to the Lampang Elephant hospital to do their internships.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 20
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Staff from the hospital prepare a patient to get a drip on the ear. Elephants often come from the Thai-Myanmar border, mostly from Karen and Shan regions where these animals are still used in daily life as carriers.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 21
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

An intravenous feed in the back of the ear of an elephant with strong dehydration problems is glued to its skin and secured with tape.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 22
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Elephants are gluttons and would eat all day if allowed to. Their diet at the hospital has to be stricktly controlled.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 23
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

The drip-feed has to be set higher than the animal. Vets and assistants need to climb ladders to reach a proper height.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 24
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Soraida Salwala is now 60. She is been having health issues but is still fighting for elephants rights.

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Elephant Hospital in Thailand 25
Lampang
By vincenzo floramo
06 Jul 2015

Elephants are gluttons and would eat all day if allowed to. Their diet at the hospital has to be strictly controlled

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (25 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
06 Jun 2013

An elephant that was killed by poachers with a poison arrow three weeks ago in the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 6 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (11 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
05 Jun 2013

A elephant can be seen in the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 5 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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Nepal Elephant Beauty Contest
Chitwan, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
28 Dec 2012

For the last three years Nepal has been organizing Elephant Beauty Contest in December in Chitwan. On Dec 28, beautifully dressed up with colorful makeup, Pinky Kali, Prakriti Kali and Chitwan Kali walked on the ramp. A team of judges looked at their physical hygiene,body structures, their nails and dresses. The event seemed like any other beauty pageants however with elephants as the participants. Elephants' intelligence was also judged. Elephants perform catwalk, shake hands and greet as requested by the judges.

Chitwan Kali, an elephant from the Chitwan National Park won the award.

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Nepal Elephant Beauty Contest (1 of 10)
Chitwan, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
28 Dec 2012

Pinki Kali, one of the participants at the elephant beauty contest, painted on Dec. 28, 2012 in Chitwan, Nepal. This was the third Elephant Beauty Contest held in Nepal.

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Wildlife Crimes (37 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
28 Oct 2012

An amulet store owner inspects a statue of an ascetic monk made from Ivory. He will sell it for 35,000 baht (1,200 USD)

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (38 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
28 Oct 2012

Researchers at the Department of National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation's biolab conduct DNA tests on confiscated Ivory in order to determine it source of origin and thus prosecute people found in possession of African Ivroy.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (29 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
24 Oct 2012

Customs officials in Bangkok's Suvarnabhumi airport uncover a shipment of African elephant tusks from Mozambique. Suvarnabhumi has always been a hub for illicit trafficking, mostly in narcotics, but the recent explosion of demand for animal products has added elephant tusks to the list of contraband.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (30 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
24 Oct 2012

Customs officials in Bangkok's Suvarnabhumi airport uncover a shipment of African elephant tusks from Mozambique. Suvarnabhumi has always been a hub for illicit trafficking, mostly in narcotics, but the recent explosion of demand for animal products has added elephant tusks to the list of contraband.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (20 of 47)
Gamba, Gabon
By James Morgan
30 Jun 2012

Auerlie Kombi and Tuburse Mouyamba take me to an elephant carcas they found outside Sounga village in Gamba district, Gabon.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (21 of 47)
Gamba, Gabon
By James Morgan
30 Jun 2012

Aurelie Kumbe and Tuburse Mouyamba take me to see an elephant carcass they found outside their village in the Gamba district of Gabon. The tusks are long gone, but bones as large as these are not easily buried.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON