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Esplin120623_2381.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
23 Jun 2012

A fisherman farms abalone instead of heading out to sea to fish. Communities throughout the Philippines are being encouraged to seek alternative sources of income from fishing. According to the WWF, “The decreased productivity of coastal ecosystems will reduce the food resources and income available to coastal communities in the Coral Triangle. By 2050, coastal ecosystems will only be able to provide 50% of the fish protein that they do today, leading to increasing pressure on coastal agriculture and aquaculture.”

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Esplin120622_2389.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
22 Jun 2012

The cultivation of kelp and seaweed for pharmaceutical industries is being developed by some communities as an alternative source of income to prevent an over reliance of fishing for an income, thereby reducing the stress on local fish populations.

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Esplin120620_2327.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
20 Jun 2012

Children play in a harbour in the Southern Philippines. Scientists have predicted that by 2100, global temperature rise could result in the extinction of coral in the Coral Triangle. This would lead to an 80% reduction in regional food production.

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Esplin120619_2387.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
19 Jun 2012

A child helps sort the catch on a small fishing vessel in the Southern Philippines. With nine percent of the total global reef cover, its national waters provide significant annual fish yield. Increasingly, fish catch are being sold for export, with China and Hong Kong the primary destination.
There is a billion-dollar enterprise in the Asia-Pacific region for live reef food fish trade (LRRFFT). The Philippines is a significant contributor to this industry.

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Esplin120618_2379.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
18 Jun 2012

A Filipino fisherman wears a mask to protect against the sun as he spends the morning catching octopus from a small canoe. Though largely seen as being sustainable, subsistence fishermen with a hook and line can still have an impact on their local ecology. Jared Diamond, an ecological anthropologist, claims the common belief that indigenous people conserve their resources is wrong. He writes that historically when people encounter the limits of their resources, catastrophe results.

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Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Volunteers joined the first organized coastal clean-up last July 17, 2011

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

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Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Timelapse photography of coastal lagoon clean-up taken last July 17, 2011.

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Mohammad Ali is watering the little trees that are placed inside the enclosure. Every tree gets a couple of litres of water so it stays alive.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

A goat has been slaughtered and is waiting to be cut up, cooked and eaten for lunch.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Donkeys are the young shepherds' preferred transportation in the desert. Every day they lead the animals out towards food and water. The sun is coming down relentlessly and the heat is extreme even early in the day.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

The young men from the surrounding Bedouin camps met up in the common “television lounge” which is a shed without windows. With one lamp hanging from the ceiling and a TV they spend the night together. The electricity they get from a solar panel, which a NGO built for them. Tonight they are watching a Turkish soap series translated into Arabic.
From left: Khaled, Awda, Ferhan, Suad, Mosa and Salem.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Hamida is the oldest Bedouin in and around Rashayida. The word is that she is 110 years old.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Taleb is laying on a couple of mattresses in a Bedouin camp in the desert. The Bedouins in this area have many children. A lot of men have two wives and upwards of twenty children.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Several of the men have gone out into the desert to check up on the animals. Afterwards they are resting, enjoying the wild nature, before returning back home.
From left: Salem, Mohammad, Saad, Salem, Yusef and Funkhor

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

A fire is lit for making tea. Drinking tea is an integrated part of being Bedouin.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

A traditional Bedouin meal consists of pieces of meat of goat or lamb put on top of a base of rice and bread and then poured over with warm water. The food is eaten by forming meat, rice and bread into a little ball, which you then shove into your mouth with your thumb.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

The tank is the Bedouin's only way to get water when the rainwater cisterns are not filled.
The water they use for everything from cooking to feeding to the animals. The tanks are placed in the outskirts of the camps and then the water is filled into smaller containers and brought into the camp.
The water is being transported from the nearby desert village in a tractor. With the expenses of rental of a tractor, gas and the price of the water the total amount is circa 55 dollars and is a major part of the budget. In some periods it can be necessary to collect water as much as once a day.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Shepherd in the desert is resting while his livestock is making their way throught the desert.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

The men do not work as much as the women. But they always handle the slaughtering of animals. The younger men are shepherds while the older men are the patriarchs of the family. They are in charge and are responsible for making sure that everything is being done according to plan.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Omar is trying to move the donkey. At the same time the donkey is drinking from a leak in a water pipe that connects the houses in Rashayida with water.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

The view from Mohammad’s house in Rashayida. He has a wife in the desert village and a wife out in the desert a few kilometres away. It is a part of ancient Bedouin culture to have more than one wife.
Najat, one of Mohammad’s many daughters, is playing in front of the house.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Up the hill behind the fence is a large manmade pool where the Bedouins lead the animals to drink water. It is built by YMCA and Dan Church Aid(NGO’s). It is projects like this that help the Bedouins maintain their ancient way of life in the desert.
The pool is built on the site for an ancient christian church several centuries old.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Bedouin in the desert, riding on his donkey and taking care of his animals.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Ferhan drinks from a rain water cistern. Even though the water is only for live stock due to parasites.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Alia is helping the women clean out the enclosure for the goats. Everybody has to work, even the kids. The dust is everywhere while animal feces and dirt is put into large bags, bare handed.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Empty containers in the desert. To be filled with water from a rainwater cistern.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
27 Mar 2011

Ferhan is a shepherd. Almost every day he takes the sheep out for as much as ten hours. He is resting before he rides on with the animals into the desert. The Bedouins have goats, Sheep and camels. The animals are their livelihood.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
27 Mar 2011

Na’ma is making sure the sheep stays still while Sabha is milking it. The women in the Bedouin communities are in charge of almost all of the domestic duties. They prepare food, take care of the kids and milk the animals at the end of the day, when they get back from grazing in the desert.