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Skin-Eating Disease Spread in the Mid...
Al Qamisil, Al Hasakah, Syria
By yekru
09 Jun 2016

June 9, 2015
Amuda, Syria

A remarkable increase of people infected by Leishmaniasis is reported across the Middle East. As the ongoing conflict in Syria is causing the migration of thousands from the countrysides, many refugees and residents are exposed to the parasitic disease which is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected sand flies which breed in rubble and trash. The disease causes horrible open sores and well as disfiguring skin lesions.

Leishmaniasis, commonly known among Syrians as “Aleppo pimple”, had previously been contained in Aleppo and neighboring cities. However today’s refugee crisis has triggered a huge outbreak with hundreds of thousands affected in Syria and neighboring countries that are hosting Syrian refugees.
Reports indicated that ISIS-controlled territories, specially in Raqqa, Deir Azzor and Hasaka, are the regions most affected by Leishmaniasis.

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Leishmania spreads in Syria
Idleb, Syria
By Idleb Press
28 Apr 2013

Leishmania spreads in Syria.
A video report about this disease from the village of Maar Shourin which is located in the countryside of Idleb.

Due to the lack of basic amenities and health care in Syria, Leishmaniasis, a complex disease, has been affecting a large number of the population in Idleb, northern Syria. The disease is transmitted through the a bite of a sandfly, affecting different parts of the body, resulting in sores on the skin and welts. The sores, sometimes, get infected.

Since the basic conditions of the Syrian people is very poor, the disease is most likely to be fatal. Also, regarding the fact that wartime conditions compromise the immune system, this disease is bound to spread quickly.

The medicine required for treatment is scarce in Syria, but the people of Idlib are attempting to assist every infected person without a fee.

It is difficult, at the moment, to assess the number of Leishmaniasis cases in Syria, but the poor conditions showed that the disease will continue transmitting from one person to another.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Children who live in the Shansharah archeological site in the north-east have fun in the ruins. They lauch stones into the tall herbs where the insects live that transmit leshmania are. This skin disease devastates this rural region.

Les enfants qui vivent dans le site archéologique de Shansharah au nord-ouest du pays s’amusent dans les ruines. Ils en profitent pour lancer des cailloux dans les herbes hautes où se trouvent les insectes qui transmettent la leishmaniose, maladie de peau qui fait des ravages dans cette région rurale.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib Province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Child infected by leishmania, a skin disease that is passed on by an insect that looks like a big mosquito and is devastating this rural region. It provokes red stings which attack the skin. Before the revolution, an insecticide was spread in order to kill the insect. No humanitarian organization is supporting the sick people.
Un enfant atteint de la leishmaniose. Cette maladie de peau transmise par un insecte ressemblant à un gros moustique fait des ravages dans cette région rurale. Il provoque des boutons qui rongent la peau. Avant la révolution, un insecticide était diffusé pour éradiquer l'insecte. Aucune organisation humanitaire ne vient en aide aux malades.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Child infected by leishmania, a skin disease that is passed on by an insect that looks like a big mosquito and is devastating this rural region. It provokes red stings which attack the skin. Before the revolution, an insecticide was spread in order to kill the insect. No humanitarian organization is supporting the sick people.
Un enfant atteint de la leishmaniose. Cette maladie de peau transmise par un insecte ressemblant à un gros moustique fait des ravages dans cette région rurale. Il provoque des boutons qui rongent la peau. Avant la révolution, un insecticide était diffusé pour éradiquer l'insecte. Aucune organisation humanitaire ne vient en aide aux malades.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Hygiene is very bad on the Shansharah archeological site, Idlib region. They fled the air strikes without being able to bring their personal belongings.

Les conditions d'hygiène des populations déplacées dans le site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb sont déplorables. Ils ont fui les bombardements sans pouvoir emporter leurs affaires personnelles.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

A baby infected by leishmania, a skin disease that is passed on by an insect that looks like a big mosquito and is devastating this rural region. It provokes red stings which attack the skin. Before the revolution, an insecticide was spread in order to kill the insect. No humanitarian organization is supporting the sick people.

Bébé atteint de la leishmaniose. Cette maladie de peau transmise par un insecte ressemblant à un gros moustique fait des ravages dans cette région rurale. Il provoque des boutons qui rongent la peau. Avant la révolution, un insecticide était diffusé pour éradiquer l'insecte. Aucune organisation humanitaire ne vient en aide aux malades.

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LIVING WITH LEPROSY IN ETHIOPIA - Edi...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Editor's Picks
04 Feb 2013

In Ethiopia living with leprosy has enormous social implications. Though it is not contagious, contracting the disease forces most people to a solitary life, or at best, into a leper community such as are found throughout the country. Medicinal and educational advances see understanding of the disease growing in Ethiopia, not least apparent at The Alert hospital, a charitable hospital funded primarily through European aid that provides inexpensive or free treatment to many victims of leprosy.

The Alert hospital is situated in a slum, where a small group of women gather to fight their condition; they've created a small business in which they knit, sew and sell traditional garments and bedding, earning a small salary that contributes to the well being of their families. Life continues to be difficult, but several women are able to provide schooling, food, and a home for their children and ease some of the distress of living with leprosy.

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Leper Community in Addis Ababa
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By U.S. Editor
28 Jan 2013

Leprosy has been identified as a major health problem in Ethiopia since the 1950's, when the effort to control leprosy began by the establishment of a National leprosy office in the Ministry of Health with the support of German Leprosy Relief Association (GLRA). There are three main regions where Leprosy is still endemic, that is Oromiya, Amhara and SNNPRG in the Central and South Eastern highlands.
Following the introduction of MDT and the consequent reduction in the duration of treatment, there resulted a constant and steady decline in the prevalence of leprosy. Due to the reduction in number of patients registered, which has also reduced the workload of leprosy services, they have integrated the leprosy program within the general health services. The integration services covers a wider geographical area and is closer to the community. This integration is believed to reduce the stigma associated with leprosy and they think may have an impact on the epidemiology.
Today however lepers are rarely included in society. In Northern Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, thousands of lepers lives in poverty with their families, excluded from Ethiopian society. Their plight is nothing new in this poor East African country. Since the 19th century Western travelers or scientists have described the harsh living conditions of these outcast carrying, as thought back then, a very contagious sickness. About three thousand live in this northern slum, trying to survive by begging on the streets of the capital, or near the only church of the area. Such a woman, Kelbe Adamu, 60 years old, left her small village hoping to find better understanding of her countrymen in the capital. She was quickly disappointed, as her life did not improve. However with time she was able to find a small job sewing traditional Ethiopian clothes and bed sheets with other women lepers, making a small living, enough to feed herself and her grandchildren born in the slum.

But not all is bleak. A group of women with leprosy have gotten together to fight their condition. They created a small business where a dozen or so of these women knit and put together traditional garments and bed sheets. Using their bare hands and ancients machinery, these women have managed to organize a small business where they can earn a small salary from their sales. Kelebe, 60 years old, is one of these women. She arrived in the slum from the Northern part of the country to start over and perhaps find a better life after her husband died. She brought with her, her children, cousins, and other relatives, to increase their chances of survival. Once there, she was quickly reminded that her condition would not make things life easy for her and her family. She managed to find a shack made out of mud with metal roofing, and dirt floors. She, however did not give up, and joined these businesswomen. The fruit of her work has helped her to feed herself as well as her family members. In fact it has allowed her to prosper, buy new close and give some schooling to the youngest in her family.
With an ongoing fix price of 50$ for the most expensive bedding, the little company has been able to sustain itself for a few years now, feeding a dozen family. However this small grouping seem to be the exception to the rule. Most lepers in the slum keep starving; their offspring have no more future than their parents did before them, and the government seems uninterested in helping this portion of the population.

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CHILDREN OF AGENT ORANGE
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
By Mais Istanbuli
18 Jan 2011

According to the United Nations, Agent Orange and its active ingredient dioxin is "one of the most toxic compounds known to humans.". It is claimed that children born to parents exposed to Agent Orange can be stillborn or born with birth defects, including skin disease, mental illness, and deformities. After decades of Vietnam War, effects of Agent Orange still runs silently through generations.