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Rohingya #06
Sittwe
By Lauren DeCicca
27 Nov 2014

A Rohingya woman gathers water from a small pond at the entrance to the Myebon IDP camp in Rakhine State on November 27, 2014.

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Rohingya #07
Sittwe
By Lauren DeCicca
27 Nov 2014

A young girl reads from her textbook in the makeshift school in the Myebon IDP camp in Myanmar's Rakhine State on November 27, 2014.

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Rohingya #05
Sittwe
By Lauren DeCicca
27 Nov 2014

A Rohingya woman holds her newly granted "pink card" giving her citizenship in Myanmar on November 27, 2014. The pink card will grant her the ability to travel outside of her camp, which has been restricted for the past two years.

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Rohingya #13
Sittwe
By Lauren DeCicca
27 Nov 2014

The Arakan Women's Network creates picket signs condemning the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon for using the word "Rohingya" to describe the muslim population in Rakhine State.

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Rohingya #04
Sittwe
By Lauren DeCicca
27 Nov 2014

A Rohingya man and his ten year old son lay on the floor of their shelter in the Myebon IDP camp in Myanmar's Rakhine State on November 27, 2014.

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Rohingya #08
Sittwe
By Lauren DeCicca
26 Nov 2014

A Rohingya man who was granted a "pink card" stands outside of a market in the Rohingya Muslim internal displacement camps outside of Sittwe, Myanmar on November 26, 2014.

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Rohingya #25
Sittwe
By Lauren DeCicca
26 Nov 2014

Fishing boats sit on the edge of the Bay of Bengal in the Rohingya Muslim internal displacement camps outside of Sittwe, Myanmar on November 26, 2014. These boats are used to transport refugees to bigger boats that will take them out of Rakhine State.

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Protecting an Ancient Damascus Synagogue
Damascus
By Abdu al-Fadel
19 Sep 2014

September 19, 2014
al-Madares Street, Jobar, Damascus

Local citizens protect and maintain an ancient Jewish synagogue in the besieged Damascus suburb of Jobar, despite the heavy damage inflicted on it by heavy clashes between the FSA and Syrian Army. Located at the end of al-Madares street, the synagogue is believed to date from 720 BCE and was a temple for the prophet Khedr and prophet Elias.

The monument was largely neglected by the Syrian government before the war and has been damaged many times with mortars and bombs during the war. However, its local caretaker, and the inhabitants of the area continue to care for the building, as they have for decades.

Shot list:
Various shots show the location of the synagogue and the damage to the building.
Various shots show the remains of the synagogue, such as historical artifacts and some ancient writings
Various shots show an underground chamber that is said to have been used by prophet Khedr to pray
Various shots show the massive destruction that happened around the synagogue

Sound Bites:
Abu Loay, a member of the local committee of Jobar, interested in the issue of the synagogue, explains the story of the synagogue from its establishment to the present day.
(00:39)

Interviewer: How long have you had this job?

Abu Loay: We have been taking care of the synagogue for the past 2-3 years. There used to be a guard here, but he left after the problems started, and then the inhabitants of the area left, so we came here, the men and myself. We are taking care of it. The citizens and the elderly of this town asked us to stay here and guard the synagogue and until now, it has not been attacked.

Interviewer: How was the synagogue looking when you started working here?

Abu Loay: It was amazing, it had fence and it was an ancient historical monument, it goes back thousands of years.
Interviewer: Were there any Jews living in the area?

Abu Loay: Here in Jobar we did not have any Jews, but back in the days of our grandparents, we used to have Jews. When I was a child, I remember there was a big percentage of Jews in the Jewish street. They used to come every Saturday from the Jewish street to visit the synagogue here. When Israel was established, many of the Jews left, that was along time ago.

Interviewer: Were there huge numbers of Jews in Damascus?

Abu Loay: Yes of course, they all used to live in the Jewish street, an area named the Jewish street, in the old city of Damascus.

Interviewer: When did they leave and where did they go?

Abu Loay: Most of them went to Israel, the government back then gave them a choice, to either stay here or leave, and a lot of them chose to leave.

Interviewer: How was the synagogue destroyed?

Abu Loay: About two years ago, from the side of Harasta, they [Syrian Army] attacked us with the multiple rocket launcher. Over 15 shells were dropped at the same time. I took footage of the incident and then I tried [to expose the attack], I went to many media outlets, trying to call the Jews to come and protect the synagogue, but nobody responded. They [Syrian Army] hit the ceiling in two spots and the kitchen burnt down.

Interviewer: Why did you keep protecting the synagogue if the Jews themselves did not respond and did not come to protect it?

Abu Loay: First of all, the synagogue is located in my town, I am from Jobar. Secondly, it is a legacy, not only for the Jews, but also for us. It is a legacy for the citizens of Jobar. It is thousands of years old and it is as valuable as any church or mosque.

Interviewer: Being here in the synagogue, do you feel any attachment to this place?

Abu Loay: I swear I feel like it is my own home. I was sleeping right here, with my wife and children, and if I have to go somewhere I lock the place up. I was residing here for about six months.

Interviewer: How did you feel when the synagogue was attacked and destroyed?

Abu Loay: I felt like I lost a piece of my heart. Only someone who lives here will understand the true value of this synagogue.

Interviewer: Do you think there is a way to repair the synagogue?

Abu Loay: In this condition, all of this wreckage must be removed, they destroyed it. Go back to the old pictures of the synagogue and compare, it used to be heaven.

Interviewer: Do you speak Hebrew?

Abu Loay: No I only speak the language of Jobar.

Interviewer: Do you mind escorting us on a tour around the synagogue?

Abu Loay: Of course, I do not mind, let’s take the tour.
(04:28)

(04:33) Here there used to be the main door, and there, it used to be a kitchen. There is the room I used to sleep in.
This room was an office and I used to sleep in it. The women used to sleep upstairs, and this was a storage room. The main temple is in the back. This is the only tree that is still living.

(05:44) This is a new building, and there were rooms and the rooftop.
That used to be the entrance of the synagogue, and there use to be two rooms up there. And there was a water well.
Can you see this slot in the wall, they used to store the oil cans in their. Near the pile of rocks there used to be the alter. Those two chambers are completely destroyed.

(07:17) Look at the pigeon nest in the gap in the wall. That was here before the shelling.
This is an old school, and there used to be a wall here, the old school is for UNRWA [United Nations Relief and Works Agency].
There used to be a room, then a small hall and then another room, all ancient.
This carpet is from the remains of the temple, they used to love those colors, our brothers the Jews. This is another one, everything valuable we were able to find after the destruction, we removed it.

(08:39) Here used to be a huge bronze round plate, and here is the step of the prophet. Here they used to keep the oil, here they used to have books, and there was the seating area. The building was ancient and the temple had a very high ceiling.

(09:30) Here, where I am walking, used to be the few steps leading to the alter. Where I am standing now is the location of the alter. It was about half a circle and made out of wood and the chandeliers above it, it used to be amazing.

(10:20) Those gaps in the walls used to have frames, and here used to be a painting, and next to it a bronze box labeled "Charity".
And here, as we said before, they used to keep the oil.

(11:28) Here is the prayer chamber, our grandfathers used to say that the prophet Khedr used to come to pray here. This hole in the ceiling was an air vent for this chamber, but the shelling has destroyed most of the room.

(12:21) Look what the destruction did to it. The last time they dropped vacuum bombs on this area, the buildings around the synagogue were also destroyed.

(12:41) There used to be four candlesticks and a chair, an antique chair, they are not destroyed, we preserved them.

(13:05) This is the wreckage of the synagogue. They [Syrian Military] attacked us with many types of weapons, including jets. The last airstrike, they dropped vacuum bombs on us and destroyed all of the buildings.

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Quiapo 13
Manila, Metro Manila
By David Ozkoidi
18 Sep 2014

Inside the Golden Mosque in Quiapo where many Muslims come to rest, to pray and talk. Many Muslims in Manila come from the provinces of Mindanao where Islam is a growing religion.

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Quiapo 24
Manila, Metro Manila
By David Ozkoidi
14 Sep 2014

The faith of Filipinos is evident in all temples of the Islands and the worship of images of saints, virgins and Christs. Quietly and in long lines parishioners are waiting to touch the religious figures. Quiapo, Manila. Philippines.

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Quiapo 02
Manila, Metro Manila
By David Ozkoidi
09 Sep 2014

A large group of grandmothers sell candles of all colors, in their view, lighting them serve to improve different aspects of life from love to the money. Religions are mixed to pagan beliefs in the district of Quiapo, Manila.

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Quiapo 03
Manila, Metro Manila
By David Ozkoidi
09 Sep 2014

Thousands of people pass daily through the huge Catholic church called "Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene" or "Quiapo Church." In the early nineteenth century the church and the Plaza Miranda were the center of what was the city of Manila.

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Quiapo 09
Manila, Metro Manila
By David Ozkoidi
09 Sep 2014

Demonstration of communist people in Quezon Boulevard against Martial Law imposed from 1972-1981 by the former President Marcos.

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Quiapo 12
Manila, Metro Manila
By David Ozkoidi
09 Sep 2014

Rush Hour in Quezon Boulevard. Traffic jams are continuous. Right hand side Quiapo Church, left the area where the Golden Mosque is.

Dying Trades in the Holy Land
By dafnatal7
04 Sep 2014

A look at some of Israel's last family businesses, which are being crushed by changing times. For some of the most traditional Jewish and Arab businesses, it won't be long before their doors close for the last time. New technologies, large corporations, and the draw of the modern world mean that the next generation of consumers and the heirs to the businesses no longer have an interest in the businesses' futures.

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frontline in Tuz Khurmatu, Iraq
tuzkhurmatu, iraq
By Arianna Pagani
28 Aug 2014

28 August 2014, Tuz Khurmatu distance about 75 km south of Kirkuk. The Kurdish army launches a mortar to the city occupied by the militants of the Islamic State. The soldiers who were outside the base to help the peshmerga who had been sent on ahead, come back at the end of the fight. No deaths and no injuries.

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frontline in Tuz Khurmatu, Iraq
tuzkhurmatu, iraq
By Arianna Pagani
28 Aug 2014

28 August 2014, Tuz Khurmatu distance about 75 km south of Kirkuk. The Kurdish army launches a mortar to the city occupied by the militants of the Islamic State. The soldiers who were outside the base to help the peshmerga who had been sent on ahead, come back at the end of the fight. No deaths and no injuries.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Between cohabitation and turns the military are able to find moments of fun. Some soldiers playing dominoes in tents.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Every soldier doing his job harder. Many of them come from cities that have been invaded by the army of Islamic state. They perceive a salary and their work shifts are approximately 10 days.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

The peshmerga now have become very important for Kurdistan. For following decades, have had a bad reputation as warriors unconquered of the mountains.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

The soldiers during the breaks have to keep their weapons clean.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

The kitchen where soldiers take turns for preparing dinner for the people in the frontline.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

The young peshmerga fighters have no battle experience. Many of the older pesh merga moved on, starting businesses and embracing the changing face of Kurdistan.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

When the light begins to decline many military take the time to call their families at home. A moment of intimacy in a military base full of men is not easy to find.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

A Kurdish peshmerga prepares a cup of tea before starting his turn in the frontline against IS.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

An officer of the frontline in a moment of pause. That day they discussed the situation about weapons sponsor by the European Union.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

In the bases of the mountains there are instance Peshmerga professionals including many young people.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

There is no exact number of peshmerga fighters. Both youth and adults are lined up against a single enemy. they took up arms under one banner of a united Kurdistan.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

With the coming of night, the air becomes heavier on the frontline. With the darkness the Islamic Army has more ease in advancing position or try to attack the Kurdish army.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

A moment of pause before the exchange with another soldier to control the aera under the frontline. A guy calls his family.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Peshmerga fighters on the front line against militants of IS. The base is close to Bashiqa village and Mosul. During the nights there are different movements of the Sunni guerrillas.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

In the frontline of the mountain Bashiqa, two young Kurdish military are given the change of position. The control over the villages occupied by ISIS is constant.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Some young soldiers are shuttling between major base and a control tower. They bring food for dinner.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

New men come into the frontline of the mountain Bashiqa. Probably ready to join in the Kurdish military. What remains to be seen is how long the pesh merga will be able to rely on the support of outsiders.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

The mountain of Bashiqa is under the control of the Peshmerga. Is also the official name of the armed forces of the Kurdistan Regional Government in the semiautonomous Iraqi Kurdistan. After the continuous advance of the Islamic state Kurds maintained their positions of control.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Kurdish Peshmerga has strengthened its presence in Nineveh province’s. This area is currently disputed between Sunnis members of the Islamic state and the forces of both Kurdish and Iraqi.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Since Aug. 2, IS militants made forays into the peshmerga-controlled territories of the Ninevah plains. They moving into the towns of Hamdaiya, Telkayf, Bartalla and Bashiqa on the north and east of Mosul.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

This guy on the frontline shows off his tattoo which is the symbol of P.U.K an Iraqi-Kurdish political party in Iraqi Kurdistan and YPG.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

On the mountain of Bashiqa. Inside the base camp during the days the soldiers held only controlled the situation. While some boys are resting others prepare for nightfall.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Some soldiers sitting on the rocks looking over the town of Bashiqa. Lying just 18 kilometers from Mosul with two roads linking it to Iraq's most volatile city, Bashiqa and nearby villages in Nineveh provinces. They occupied the heart of Iraq's minority communities for centuries.