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New Edict Threatens Progress for Afgh...
Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
19 Apr 2012

Storyline: One of the most significant achievements of the new era in Afghanistan, after the fall of the Taliban, is in new freedoms for Afghan women. They are allowed to work in public, go to school, and participate in the political sphere-- something they were not allowed to do under the Taliban. However, the Afghan Religious Council, composed of hard-line religious leaders, has recently issued a new edict that calls women second-class citizens and prohibits them from traveling without the escort of a Mahram [male family member]. The edict was endorsed by the president, and has the potential of becoming law. Many people believe the Afghan government aims to woo the Taliban into peace talks by crafting and endorsing such a controversial mandate. The law has faced widespread resentment by Afghan women activists and Afghanistan’s civil society, putting pressure on the religious council and Ulema to revoke their edict.

Yalda Samih is young girl, her family lives in Kandahar province but Yalda lives in Kabul because she studies at the American University of Afghanistan.
Soundbite-1 Translation: Yalda Samih Student living in dorm: "it's very difficult for a girl to refrain from traveling unless she has a male chaperon, because not everyone has many brothers, or a father to accompany her everywhere. if it happens (the edict becomes a law), then we will face a lot of difficulties."
According to women activists in Kabul this is an unrealistic and unenforceable law for the citizens of Afghanistan.

Arezo Omid is a young woman activist who works with Young Women for Change, an organization of young women activists who advocate for women's rights. She says the law is unrealistic, and cannot be imposed on women in Afghanistan.
Soundbite-2 Translation: Arezo Omid (1:00-1:17): "I was very disappointed about this edict of Ulema council, because we are not rich people to have a male company accompany us during our trips outside the country. it's very difficult for those people who don't have a Mahram."

Soundbite-3 Translation: Yalda Samih (1:17-1:32): "if this edict becomes a law, I have to leave university. because I don't have anyone to come with me and live in the dorm. my father is responsible for the rest of the family, and I have a younger brother, who is studying school in Kandahar. So I would have to leave university.

Enayatullah Baligh a member of Islamic Ulema Council rejects Yalda's claim about the edict.
Soundbite-4 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh Member of Islamic Ulema councils: "Find a husband. find yourself a Mahram (male chaperon), these are all childish words."

Sounbite-5 Translation: Yalda samih (1:42-1:55): "I think it is impossible, because around 1.5 million widows live in Afghanistan. this edict also questions women's freedom. those who want to study can't get married and study. it is impossible."

Sounbite-6 Translation: Arezo Omid (1:56-2:05): "I personally think the government wants to get Taliban closer. If the Taliban come back to power, we will do the same thing we did last time and leave the country for the Taliban and immigrate to other countries"

Soundbite-7 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (2:07-2:14): "When they say, 'we got closer to the Taliban because we are scared of the Taliban,' it's totally wrong. We are not scared of the Taliban, it is the issue of religion."

Sounbite-8 Translation: Arezo Omid (2:15-2:21): "the problem is that high ranking government officials support these edicts."

Sounbite-9 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (2:23-2:44): "This edict does not need to be passed, it's a matter of religion. It is higher than the Constitution of Afghanistan, because the Afghanistan constitution states that no law is above the Islamic law. They must not ignore our edict, if they do, the Ulema Council will take action".

Soundbite-10 Translation: Soraya Kabul resident: "As an Afghan girl, I do not accept this edict, because Afghan men and women had, and must have, equal rights. And women make half of the society."

Soundbite-11 Translation: Sana Kabul resident: "I do not accept this edict, because it states that every woman should be accompanied by a man, and I would like to say that President Karzai's wife is a doctor and Mr. president can't be with his wife everywhere. So I don't accept this edict and will not obey it."

Soundbite-12 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (3:43-4:23): Afghan women are Muslims, so they can never oppose this edict. If they oppose this edict that means they have rejected the religion. If a minister is traveling he takes a body guard with him, so why can't our sisters take someone like their brother, uncle or nephew with them? These women do not understand. It's for their good. If there are widows, the government is responsible to pay for their food, and the government is responsible to pay for the person to travel with her as well. It's all for the good of the women. I don't understand how it is NOT observing women's rights.

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Egypt's Al-Azhar and Church Officials...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
04 Apr 2012

Cairo, Egypt | April 4, 2012

Interim leader of Egypt's Coptic Orthodox Church Bishop Bakhomious, who temporarily replaced late Pope Shenouda, met with Grand Imam of Al-Azhar, Shiekh Ahmed al-Tayyib on Wednesday, April 4, at Al-Azhar headquarters in Cairo, where they expressed their rejection of the constitution-writing panel tasked with drafting Egypt’s new constitution which is dominated by Islamists, particularly the Muslim Brotherhood.

They stressed that the current panel doesn’t offer fair representation of all Egyptians, particularly the minorities.

Bakhomious said that the democracy doesn’t mean the dictatorship of the majority.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Bishop Bakhomious, Coptic Orthodox Church interim leader:
"Democracy is not the dictatorship of the majority. The governing of the people, which is democracy, means involving all categories of society including the very small minorities."

For his part, Dr. Mahmoud Azab, Grand Imam of Al-Azhar's adviser on dialogue showed complete agreement with Bishop Bakhomious and warned that if the constitution committee did not represent all Egyptians including minorities, the nation's unity would be "in danger".

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - Mahmoud Azab, Grand Imam of Al-Azhar's adviser on dialogue:
"The Egyptian people must agree politically to the country's common good. Political agreement, like Bishop Bakhomious said, doesn’t mean the dictatorship of the majority but it means that the majority run the affairs while the minorities have their weight, including all forms of intellectual, religious and sectarian minorities. This is a matter of agreement between us and Egypt's Church and between average civilian Muslims and the Christians. Otherwise, the nation's ship is in danger."

Bishop Bakhomious denied that there was a deal between Al-Azhar and the Church to withdraw from the panel.

The Coptic Orthodox Church in Egypt announced its withdrawal from the panel few days after the withdrawal of Al-Azhar, the highest religious authority in the Sunni Muslim world, claiming the panel is illegitimate.

Egyptian Court is scheduled to rule on the validity of the controversial constitution-writing panel on April 10.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: April 4, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: April 4, 2012
Length: 0:01:51
Video Size: 91.7 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Tilt down, external shot of Al-Azhar headquarters in Cairo
2- Medium shot of Grand Imam of Al-Azhar, Sheikh Ahmed al-Tayyib, receiving Bishop Bakhomious
3- Pan left shot of Al-Tayyib and Bakhomious heading to the meeting hall
4- Various shots of the meeting
5- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Bishop Bakhomious, Coptic Orthodox Church interim leader:
"Democracy is not the dictatorship of the majority. The governing of the people, which is democracy, means involving all categories of society including the very small minorities." 6- Various shots of Bakhomious speaking to reporters after the meeting
7- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mahmoud Azab, Grand Imam of Al-Azhar's adviser on dialogue:
"The Egyptian people must agree politically to the country's common good. Political agreement, like Bishop Bakhomious said, doesn’t mean the dictatorship of the majority but it means that the majority run the affairs while the minorities have their weight, including all forms of intellectual, religious and sectarian minorities. This is a matter of agreement between us and Egypt's Church and between average civilian Muslims and the Christians. Otherwise, the nation's ship is in danger."
8- Various shots of Bakhomious leaving Al-Azhar headquarters after the meeting

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Egypt MPs Elect Constitution-Writing ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
24 Mar 2012

Cairo, Egypt | March 24, 2012

A debatable session was held between Egypt’s two houses of parliament, the People's Assembly and the Shura Council on Saturday, March 24, for electing the 100 members of the committee that will be responsible for writing the country's new constitution.

Meanwhile, hundreds of people, mostly liberals and Copts, gathered outside Cairo International Conference Center, where the poll was held, amid intense security presence to protest against the legitimacy of the formation of the constitution-writing panel with 50% parliamentarians, voicing concern about Islamist domination of the new constitution.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohamed Khattab, founding member of Union of Independents for Egypt:
"The constitution is for the next generations. So, all generations and ideologies should be represented. A single faction should not dominate writing the constitution. 50% of the panel cannot be parliamentarians, because they will also select the other 50% and of course they will not select someone against their vision."

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Egyptian Copt:
"Everyone tries to protect themselves. The Islamists protect themselves through writing the constitution at our expense. This is not good at all. They should consider the rights of others. We elected them and supported them because they were oppressed and persecuted by the former regime, etc. So, they shouldn't ruin us once they get to power."

A number of MPs, political activists and revolutionary movements criticized the criteria on which the panel formation is based, fearing the country is heading towards a religious direction with Islamists having the upper hand in the parliament.

The protestors raised signs against domination of Egypt's constitution by a certain group, referring to Islamists, calling for a civil state and a constitutional panel representing all categories of the society.

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Protestor:
"The constitution is the dream of the Egyptian people. I wish it wouldn’t have privileges for a certain group of the people such as the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafis. It shouldn’t also have any guarantees for the SCAF through constitutional articles protecting them against punishment or trial for the mistakes of the transitional period. There shouldn't be a central power for anyone writing the constitution."

Parliament Speaker Mohamed Saad al-Katatni announced last week that the 100-member committee will be composed of 50 parliamentarians and 50 figures from outside the parliament.

The liberal Egyptian Bloc, which includes three parties, withdrew from due to what they described as lack of proper criteria for the panel formation.

The protestors said the constitution-writing panel is the beginning of the end of January 25 Revolution.
Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: March 24, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: March 24, 2012
Length: 0:02:54
Video Size: 143 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

1- Medium external shot, large sign of Cairo International Conference Center
2- Various shots of protestors outside the Conference Center raising signs and shouting statements against the panel formation
3- Various shots of liberal parliamentarians, including famous liberal Amr Hamzawi, talking at a corridor outside the conference hall
4- Various shots of the voting process inside the conference hall
5- Medium shot, Parliament Speaker Mohamed Saad al-Katatni
6- Medium shot, a young man with a painted mask sitting on the ground and holding a sign expressing rejection
7- Various shots of the protest
8- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohamed Khattab, founding member of Union of Independents for Egypt:
"The constitution is for the next generations. So, all generations and ideologies should be represented. A single faction should not dominate writing the constitution. 50% of the panel cannot be parliamentarians, because they will also select the other 50% and of course they will not select someone against their vision." 9- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Egyptian Copt:
"Everyone tries to protect themselves. The Islamists protect themselves through writing the constitution at our expense. This is not good at all. They should consider the rights of others. We elected them and supported them because they were oppressed and persecuted by the former regime, etc. So, they shouldn't ruin us once they get to power." 10- Various shots of MPs at the conference hall
11- Various shots of liberal and Islamist MPs leaving and walking at the corridor
12- Various shots of the protest amid intense security presence
13- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Protestor:
14- "The constitution is the dream of the Egyptian people. I wish it wouldn’t have privileges for a certain group of the people such as the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafis. It shouldn’t also have any guarantees for the SCAF through constitutional articles protecting them against punishment or trial for the mistakes of the transitional period. There shouldn't be a central power for anyone writing the constitution."
15- Various shots of protestors outside the Conference Center raising signs and shouting statements against the panel formation

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Tens of Thousands Gather at Church fo...
Wadi el-Nitrun, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
20 Mar 2012

Cairo, Egypt | March 20, 2012

Tens of thousands of mourners of Copts gathered at Saint Mark’s Cathedral in Cairo on Tuesday, March 20, for the funeral of the Coptic Orthodox Church’s leader Pope Shenouda III.

Security was tight, with dozens of police and armored vehicles positioned outside the Cathedral.

Pope Shenouda, who died on Saturday at the age of 88, promoted religious harmony, winning respect of the Muslim majority although the past few years witnessed a growth in sectarian tensions that he exerted a lot of efforts to contain them.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Archbishop Antonius Zarif:
"The most important principles left by the pope were love and tolerance. Even at times of crises related to national unity, he dealt with them with wisdom, love and tolerance. If love and tolerance preached by Pope Shenouda III prevail worldwide, I believe the whole world will live in peace."

Religious figures from several countries including a delegation of senior Catholics from the Vatican massed at the Orthodox Cathedral and priests prayed over Shenouda’s body which was lying in an open coffin with a golden miter upon his head.

Egypt’s Copts expressed their appreciation for the participation of the Muslims and their sympathy with Christians over the death of Pope Shenouda.

The man was considered a symbol for love, wisdom and tolerance.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Copt man at the Cathedral:
"Pope Shenouda was as dear as our eyes. We have come from furthest Upper Egypt to the Cathedral because of the death of Pope Shenouda. May he rest in peace! He was such a great saint. He was a blessing."

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Copt young man at the Cathedral:
"If we talked about the Pope all our life we wouldn’t give him his due. He was really our leader, guidance, godfather, and everything in our life."

SOUNDBITE 4 (Arabic) – Copt young man at the Cathedral:
"We appreciate the participation of our Muslim brothers. We are Egyptians. We're compassionate and kind people and we love one another. The issue of sectarian strife and suchlike things are baseless and they have no room in our hearts as Egyptians."

The prayers were led by Bishop Bakhomious, head of the Church of Bahaira, a district at the Nile Delta northern Cairo, who will temporally replace Shenouda for two months until a new leader is elected.

A delegation also from the ruling military council and several candidates for Egypt’s upcoming presidential elections attended the funeral.

Head of Egypt’s ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) Mohamed Hussein Tantawi declared Tuesday, March 20, as a national day of mourning over the death of Pope Shenouda III.

Following the funeral, the burial will take place at Wadi El-Natrun monastery in the desert northwest of Cairo according to the will of the late Pope.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: March 20, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: March 20, 2012
Length: 0:03:46
Video Size: 186 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Wide external shot, Saint Mark Cathedral in Cairo where the funeral is held
2- Wide shot, massive numbers of people and security men outside the Cathedral
3- Medium shot, army soldiers outside the Cathedral
4- Wide shot, an armored vehicle moving in the street amid crowds outside the Cathedral
5- Medium shot, a Copt enter the Cathedral showing the cross in his hand to guards to be admitted
6- Medium shot, a Copt holding a large poster of Pope
7- Various shots of Christians standing in front of a large monitor in the church yard watching preparation of the coffin of Pope Shenouda and the prayer service
8- Medium shot, a Copt walking in the Church yard holding a poster of the late pope
9- Wide shot, tens of thousands of Copts outside the Cathedral for the pope funeral
10- Various shots of crowds of people carrying the coffin of the pope to the ambulance
11- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Archbishop Antonius Zarif:
"The most important principles left by the pope were love and tolerance. Even at times of crises related to national unity, he dealt with them with wisdom, love and tolerance. If love and tolerance preached by Pope Shenouda III prevail worldwide, I believe the whole world will live in peace."
12- Long shot, a lady enter the Cathedral showing the cross in her hand to be admitted
13- Various shots of Copts raising posters of the pope
14- Various shots of Christians standing in front of a large monitor in the church yard watching preparation of the coffin of Pope Shenouda and the prayer service
15- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Copt man at the Cathedral:
"Pope Shenouda was as dear as our eyes. We have come from furthest Upper Egypt to the Cathedral because of the death of Pope Shenouda. May he rest in peace! He was such a great saint. He was a blessing." 16- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Copt young man at the Cathedral:
"If we talked about the Pope all our life we wouldn’t give him his due. He was really our leader, guidance, godfather, and everything in our life." 17- SOUNDBITE 4 (Arabic) – Copt young man at the Cathedral:
"We appreciate the participation of our Muslim brothers. We are Egyptians. We're compassionate and kind people and we love one another. The issue of sectarian strife and suchlike things are baseless and they have no room in our hearts as Egyptians."
18- Wide shot, massive number of security men in black uniform amid crowds of people outside the Cathedral
19- Wide shot, crowds outside the Cathedral
20- Various shots of Copts raising posters of the pope
21- Various shots of Christians standing in front of a large monitor in the church yard watching preparation of the coffin of Pope Shenouda and the prayer service
22- Wide shot, massive crowds outside the Cathedral
23- Wide external shot, a sad man waving farewell to the pope with the Cathedral minarets in the background

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Pope Shenouda III, Head of Egypt Orth...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
18 Mar 2012

Cairo, Egypt | March 17, 2012

Pope Shenouda III, Head of Egypt’s Coptic Orthodox Church, died on Saturday, March 17, at the age of 88, after a long battle against illness.

The Coptic patriarch Pope Shenouda’s health has been deteriorating recently as he suffered from back and kidney problems for years and repeatedly travelled to the US for medical treatment. He was unable last Wednesday to give his weekly sermon at church.

The sound of weeping and prayers overwhelmed the Cathedral atmosphere where thousands of Copts gathered to lament the soul of the man whom they regard as a symbol for wisdom and sincerity.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Egyptian Copt at the Cathedral:
"There are no words that can make up for the value of this man. There are no words that can be said for losing such a big symbol. He was the cover sheltering all the Egyptian people, not only the Christians."

Shenouda was widely accepted by Christians and Muslims for his regular efforts to contain sectarian tensions following any incidents. He was also known for his support for the Palestinian rights in the long Middle East conflict and he was often described as an Arab nationalist by many observers.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - Pope Shenouda III [archive]:
“We want to solve the problems. We do not want to make things more dangerous and difficult. We will celebrate the birth of the Christ (on January 7) regardless of any circumstances or issues.”

In 2001, he famously stated he would never visit Jerusalem unless he entered the country with a Palestinian visa along with Mohamed Sayed Tantawi, the late Grand Imam of Egypt’s foremost religious authority, Al-Azhar.

He was born on August 3, 1923, in Asiut, Upper Egypt, and he has been the Pope of Alexandria since November 1971, when assassinated President Anwar Sadat was in power.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: March 17, 2012 [and archive]
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: March 17, 2012
Length: 0:02:20
Video Size: 115 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

1- Various shots of thousands of Copts lamenting the death of Pope Shenouda III at the Cathedral headquarters in Cairo
2- Various close shots of men and women weeping for the death of Pope Shenouda III
3- Medium shot, a young woman trying to calm down another weeping so hard
4- Various shots of the thousands of Copts lamenting the death of Pope Shenouda III
5- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Egyptian Copt at the Cathedral:
"There are no words that can make up for the value of this man. There are no words that can be said for losing such a big symbol. He was the cover sheltering all the Egyptian people, not only the Christians." 6- Various shots of thousands of Copts lamenting the death of Pope Shenouda III at the Cathedral in Cairo
7- Various medium shots of men and women weeping for the death of Pope Shenouda III
8- Medium shot, a man sitting on the floor covering his face in his lap and weeping
9- Various shots of the people at the Cathedral
10- Various shots of Pope Shenouda III on different occasions [archive]
11- Various shots of a press conference inside the church, including Pope Shenouda, late Grand Sheikh of Al-Azhar, the Mufti of Egypt and Minister of Islamic Endowments [archive]
12- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - Pope Shenouda III [archive]:
“We want to solve the problems. We do not want to make things more dangerous and difficult. We will celebrate the birth of the Christ (on January 7) regardless of any circumstances or issues.” 13- Various external shots of Egypt's Coptic Church in Cairo

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Tens of Thousands of Egyptians Bid Fa...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
18 Mar 2012

Cairo, Egypt | March 18, 2012

Tens of thousands of Egyptian Copts gathered outside the Cathedral in Cairo on Sunday, March 18, to mourn the death of their spiritual leader Pope Shenouda III, who died Saturday at the age of 88, causing deep grief to the Copts of Egypt who represent 10% of the country's 80-million population.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Egyptian Copt man at the Cathedral:
"We undoubtedly lost a great figure like Pope Shenouda, and I am certain that all Egyptians are sad for losing him because he had a great effect on our thoughts, lives and traditions. We all know that he – may he rest in peace – was the engineer of national unity."

They also gathered to bid the last farewell to the late Pope whose body was seated upright on a chair inside the Cathedral dressed in golden crown and formal attire in a mass held to pray over his soul.

All Egyptian top institution formally offered condolences to all Copts for the great loss, including the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, the Cabinet, Al-Azhar and others, besides presidential candidates and political parties including the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party (FJP).

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Egyptian Copt woman at the Cathedral:
"Egypt has lost one of its symbols. In my opinion, God has just taken the greatest man on earth. I don’t consider him an ordinary man. I consider him a saint on earth."

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Egyptian Copt man at the Cathedral:
"May the Lord comfort the people of Egypt and the whole world for the loss of Pope Shenouda. We really have lost his blessings."

Pope Shenouda's body will remain in the same position on the chair for more two days and then he will be taken for burial in a desert northern west of Cairo according to his will.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: March 18, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: March 18, 2012
Length: 0:02:45
Video Size: 135 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

1- Tilt down, Cathedral in Cairo with security men and people outside
2- Various shots of tens of thousands of Copts outside the Cathedral mourning the death of Pope Shenouda III
3- Long shot, groups of Copts on top of a building at the Cathedral while others on the floor
4- Medium shot, two women weeping over the death of Pope Shenouda III
5- Various shots of massive number of Copts outside the Cathedral mourning the death of Pope Shenouda III
6- Wide external shot, the Cathedral in Cairo
7- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Egyptian Copt man at the Cathedral:
"We undoubtedly lost a great figure like Pope Shenouda, and I am certain that all Egyptians are sad for losing him because he had a great effect on our thoughts, lives and traditions. We all know that he – may he rest in peace – was the engineer of national unity." 8- Various shots of the body of Pope Shenouda III seated on a chair inside the Cathedral dressed in golden crown and formal attire
9- Medium shot, women outside the Church lamenting the death of Pope Shenouda III
10- Medium shot, three army soldiers inside an armored vehicle
11- Various shots of Copts outside the Cathedral and some on top of an attached building
12- Various shots of Copts chanting prayers for Pope Shenouda III
13- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Egyptian Copt woman at the Cathedral:
"Egypt has lost one of its symbols. In my opinion, God has just taken the greatest man on earth. I don’t consider him an ordinary man. I consider him a saint on earth." 14- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Egyptian Copt man at the Cathedral:
"May the Lord comfort the people of Egypt and the whole world for the loss of Pope Shenouda. We really have lost his blessings." 15- Various shots of thousands of Copts lamenting the death of Pope Shenouda III at the Cathedral in Cairo

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Muslim Brotherhood Official Visits Eg...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
13 Mar 2012

For the first time, Muslim Brotherhood General- Guide Mohamed Badie paid a visit to the Anglican Church in Cairo on Tuesday, March 13, accompanied by a delegation of the MB top leaders, including former General Guide Mahdi Akef.
The meeting aims to establish a joint national group that serves the interests of the country in order to achieve stability and remove misconceptions about some controversial concepts on both sides.
The Muslim guests and the Coptic hosts, led by Anglican Church leader Safwat al-Bayad, discussed number of important Egyptian issues apart from the political side, stressing the common value of national unity.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Muslim Brotherhood General- Guide Mohamed Badie:
"The Ten Commandments in the Torah, the Gospel and the Quran are the same. They haven’t changed and they will never change. It's strange that we have the same commandments and that we carry this shared responsibility and some others attempt to break this unity. Therefore I say that we have no choice but to put our hands together and not allow any power, authority or human being to divide this gathering. Whatever is united by Almighty Allah cannot be disunited by people."
Badie affirmed that Egypt needs the efforts of all its sons whether Muslims or Christians, adding that Egypt was going through a critical transitional phase where dialogue would lead to more understanding and common values.
Badie praised the Anglican sect and its leaders as they were the ones who called for such a meeting to hold talks with the MB for the sake of the country’s interests.
They both stressed the importance to follow the religious principles and values, commending January 25 Revolution as a turning point that allowed such meetings.
Anglican Church leader Al-Bayad expressed his appreciation of the MB’s visit, calling for more national dialogues for the sake of Egypt, praising the MB as moderate and keen on the country's best interest.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: March 13, 2012
Shooting Location: Egypt
Publishing Time: March 13, 2012
Length: 0:01:57
Video Size: 96.8 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Various shots of Muslim Brotherhood General- Guide Mohamed Badie and his delegation entering the Anglican Church
2- Various shots Badie and his delegation being welcomed by Anglican Church leader Safwat al-Bayad and other church members
3- Various shots of the meeting of both sides
4- Various shots of Badie making a statement during the meeting
5- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Muslim Brotherhood General- Guide Mohamed Badie:
"The Ten Commandments in the Torah, the Gospel and the Quran are the same. They haven’t changed and they will never change. It's strange that we have the same commandments and that we carry this shared responsibility and some others attempt to break this unity. Therefore I say that we have no choice but to put our hands together and not allow any power, authority or human being to divide this gathering. Whatever is united by Almighty Allah cannot be disunited by people."
6- Various shots of the meeting
7- Various shots of Badie and his delegation leaving

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Two Non-Trusted
Cairo, Egypt
By randoshka2000
29 Jan 2012

Cairo, January 27, 2012
Protesters in Tahrir SQ, celebrating the revolution.
Sign says: "Two non-trusted Muslim brotherhood and military"

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Young Girl : Revolution Continues
Cairo, Egypt
By randoshka2000
29 Jan 2012

Cairo , January 27 ,2012
young girl protester with her father in Tahrir SQ , celebration January 25 revolution .
Sings says : Blood of martyrs is integrity revolution is continue ..continue

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Midnight in Tahrir Square
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
24 Jan 2012

Cairo, January 25, 2012

Midnight prayer in Eldobara palace church.

People praying for the souls of the martyrs.

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Without The Muslim Brotherhood
Cairo, Egypt
By randoshka2000
21 Jan 2012

January 20, 2012 - Cairo
Mahmoud was injured in Egypt's Cabinet clashes last month.
He is demonstrating at the women's march in his wheelchair, with his mother and little sister.

Chanting : The square is full without Muslim Brothers .

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Raw Footage of Chants at Cairo Candle...
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
14 Oct 2011

October 13, 2011 - A broad spectrum of Egyptian people joined in Talaat Harb square for a candlelight vigil to remember the scores who died violently last Sunday. Anger was focused on Tantawi, Egypt's Minister of Defense and head of the Military Council that currently rules Egypt. Written signs and chants testified that the Egyptian struggles are social, political, and collective, but not sectarian.

00:00-00:05: "The people say: Down with the Minister of Defense [Tantawi]"

00:05-00:30: "Every Egyptian citizen, Listen: Raise your victory flags, the revolution is alive."

00:55-01:14: "Tantawi is worthless [we know who killed Egyptians last week]. Hosni Mubarak is worthless and Gamal Mubarak is worthless. Alaa' Mubarak is worthless."

01:18-01:38: "Tantawi is just like the dog Habib [Habib Al Adly, former minister of the interior, who was famous for torture]. Listen people, Tantawi is just like Mubarak."

01:38-01:50: "People: Come join us. Freedom is for you and for all of us."

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Symbol of Solidarity at Candlelight V...
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
13 Oct 2011

A man holds a copy of the Qur'an in one hand and a poster in the other hand that says, "The Martyr Mina Daniel" above, and "Down with Military Rule" below. Mina Daniel is one of the Coptic Christians who lost their lives during the violence that erupted between protesters and the Egyptian Military on October 9, 2011.

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The Last Village
Bohoniki, Poland
By Kirk Ellingham
01 Mar 2010

Muslim Tartars in Poland

Bohoniki is a peaceful little village not far from Sokolka in the east of Poland,it is the last Tartar village before Belarus; maybe also the last of its kind.
There is no doubt that few people would have heard about it be it not for one fact: it was in this area that, in 1679, thirty Tatar soldiers were granted land for their faithful service to the Polish King Jan III Sobieski. A Tatar lady, who takes care of the Mosque, does not fail to stress that it was a reward for their valour in battle. Other sources simply say that the King was in financial straits and presented the land to his Tatar soldiers in lieu of due pay.
There are now only three Tatar families living in Bohoniki, but, considering that the village does not comprise more than thirty houses altogether, they make up about a fifth of the local population. And it is their Mosque that makes the village famous and attracts visitors from all over Poland and abroad.
Eugenia Radkieicz is the Mosque caretaker and you catch her dashing across the empty street to the small wooden Mosque when a tour bus arrives to conduct her lecture on the history of Bohoniki for groups of Polish schoolchildren.

The few families that remain are mostly elderly or sick, Evelina's father is bedridden and suffers from a Liver complaint. She takes care of the animials now and her mother worries about her future, as she must take care of them both when she gets older.
Many of the other family members are alone with their children working in cities as far afield as London to Riad.
Mrs Koztowska's son is in Spain and her elder son just returned from London, she cares for her blind husband who was injured as a boy by a German shell during World War II.
The community is still strong, the Iman comes in from Bialystock once a week for friday prayers and they are trying to set up a Religouse School in nearby Sokolka.
The village is changing though,as the young leave for foreign cities the old are left behind, but they have survived for 400 years in Poland , so they will survive still, by struggling and adapting.
The large Muslim cementary on the wooded hill just outside the village is proof of their endurance and intergration; with its Slavanised surnames and Muslim Crescents.

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China's Water Migrants - Yaoshan Vill...
ningxia, china
By Lihee Avidan
16 Oct 2008

The small Muslim province of Ningxia is one of the places hit hardly by climate change, surrounded by two expanding deserts which the UN have already declared “unfit for human habitation”. Here, China has launched one of its largest operations to mitigate the effects of climate change; the worlds largest planned eco-migration, relocating up to half a million of its poorest peasant farmers, goat herders and their families from small rural villages of cave homes, to newly built urban centers, irrigated by the yellow river.

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China's Water Migrants - Yaoshan Vill...
ningxia, china
By Lihee Avidan
16 Oct 2008

The small Muslim province of Ningxia is one of the places hit hardly by climate change, surrounded by two expanding deserts which the UN have already declared “unfit for human habitation”. Here, China has launched one of its largest operations to mitigate the effects of climate change; the worlds largest planned eco-migration, relocating up to half a million of its poorest peasant farmers, goat herders and their families from small rural villages of cave homes, to newly built urban centers, irrigated by the yellow river.

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China's Water Migrants - Yaoshan Vill...
ningxia, china
By Lihee Avidan
16 Oct 2008

The small Muslim province of Ningxia is one of the hardest places in the world in terms of climate change, surrounded by two expanding deserts which the UN have already declared “unfit for human habitation”. Here, China has launched one of its largest operations to mitigate the effects of climate change; the worlds largest planned eco-migration, relocating up to half a million of its poorest peasant farmers, goat herders and their families from small rural villages of cave homes, to newly built urban centers, irrigated by the yellow river.

Thumb sm
China's Water Migrants - Yaoshan Vill...
ningxia, china
By Lihee Avidan
16 Oct 2008

The small Muslim province of Ningxia is one of the places hit hardly by climate change, surrounded by two expanding deserts which the UN have already declared “unfit for human habitation”. Here, China has launched one of its largest operations to mitigate the effects of climate change; the worlds largest planned eco-migration, relocating up to half a million of its poorest peasant farmers, goat herders and their families from small rural villages of cave homes, to newly built urban centers, irrigated by the yellow river.

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China's Water Migrants - Yaoshan Vill...
ningxia, china
By Lihee Avidan
16 Oct 2008

The small Muslim province of Ningxia is one of the places hit hardly by climate change, surrounded by two expanding deserts which the UN have already declared “unfit for human habitation”. Here, China has launched one of its largest operations to mitigate the effects of climate change; the worlds largest planned eco-migration, relocating up to half a million of its poorest peasant farmers, goat herders and their families from small rural villages of cave homes, to newly built urban centers, irrigated by the yellow river.

Thumb sm
China's Water Migrants - Yaoshan Vill...
ningxia, china
By Lihee Avidan
16 Oct 2008

The small Muslim province of Ningxia is one of the hardest places in the world in terms of climate change, surrounded by two expanding deserts which the UN have already declared “unfit for human habitation”. Here, China has launched one of its largest operations to mitigate the effects of climate change; the worlds largest planned eco-migration, relocating up to half a million of its poorest peasant farmers, goat herders and their families from small rural villages of cave homes, to newly built urban centers, irrigated by the yellow river.

Thumb sm
China's Water Migrants - Yaoshan Vill...
ningxia, china
By Lihee Avidan
15 Oct 2008

The small Muslim province of Ningxia is one of the places hit hardly by climate change, surrounded by two expanding deserts which the UN have already declared “unfit for human habitation”. Here, China has launched one of its largest operations to mitigate the effects of climate change; the worlds largest planned eco-migration, relocating up to half a million of its poorest peasant farmers, goat herders and their families from small rural villages of cave homes, to newly built urban centers, irrigated by the yellow river.

Thumb sm
China's Water Migrants - Yaoshan Vill...
ningxia, china
By Lihee Avidan
15 Oct 2008

The small Muslim province of Ningxia is one of hardest hit places in the world by climate change – surrounded by two expanding deserts which look set to claim land the UN has already declared “unfit for human habitation”. Here, China has launched one of its largest operations to mitigate the effects of climate change – the worlds largest planned eco-migration, relocating up to half a million of its poorest peasant farmers, goat herders and their families from small rural villages living in cave homes, to newly built urban centres, irrigated by the yellow river.

Thumb sm
China's Water Migrants - Yaoshan Vill...
ningxia, china
By Lihee Avidan
15 Oct 2008

The small Muslim province of Ningxia is one of the places hit hardly by climate change, surrounded by two expanding deserts which the UN have already declared “unfit for human habitation”. Here, China has launched one of its largest operations to mitigate the effects of climate change; the worlds largest planned eco-migration, relocating up to half a million of its poorest peasant farmers, goat herders and their families from small rural villages of cave homes, to newly built urban centers, irrigated by the yellow river.

Thumb sm
China's Water Migrants - Yaoshan Vill...
ningxia, china
By Lihee Avidan
15 Oct 2008

The small Muslim province of Ningxia is one of the places hit hardly by climate change, surrounded by two expanding deserts which the UN have already declared “unfit for human habitation”. Here, China has launched one of its largest operations to mitigate the effects of climate change; the worlds largest planned eco-migration, relocating up to half a million of its poorest peasant farmers, goat herders and their families from small rural villages of cave homes, to newly built urban centers, irrigated by the yellow river.

Thumb sm
China's Water Migrants - Yaoshan Vill...
ningxia, china
By Lihee Avidan
15 Oct 2008

The small Muslim province of Ningxia is one of the places hit hardly by climate change, surrounded by two expanding deserts which the UN have already declared “unfit for human habitation”. Here, China has launched one of its largest operations to mitigate the effects of climate change; the worlds largest planned eco-migration, relocating up to half a million of its poorest peasant farmers, goat herders and their families from small rural villages of cave homes, to newly built urban centers, irrigated by the yellow river.

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China's Water Migrants - Yaoshan Vill...
ningxia, china
By Lihee Avidan
08 Oct 2008

The small Muslim province of Ningxia is one of the places hit hardly by climate change, surrounded by two expanding deserts which the UN have already declared “unfit for human habitation”. Here, China has launched one of its largest operations to mitigate the effects of climate change; the worlds largest planned eco-migration, relocating up to half a million of its poorest peasant farmers, goat herders and their families from small rural villages of cave homes, to newly built urban centers, irrigated by the yellow river.

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Kalasha People of Pakistan (18 of 18)
Chitral, Pakistan
By Jodi Hilton
01 Jul 2008

Kalash woman and girl look through the doors of a Kalash temple. Brun Village, Bumburet Valley, Chitral Region, Pakistan.

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Kalasha People of Pakistan (17 of 18)
Chitral, Pakistan
By Jodi Hilton
01 Jul 2008

Kalash children practice traditional dance at the Kalasadur School for Kalasha children in the Bumburet Valley.

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Kalasha People of Pakistan (15 of 18)
Chitral, Pakistan
By Jodi Hilton
01 Jul 2008

Kalash children attending a mixed Kalasha and Muslim school built by the Agha Khan Foundation.

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Kalasha People of Pakistan (11 of 18)
Chitral, Pakistan
By Jodi Hilton
01 Jul 2008

Kalash girl and her grandmother. The Kalash believe themselves to be descended from Alexander the Great. Bumburet Valley.

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Sample media
Rohingya #09
Sittwe
By Lauren DeCicca
01 Jan 2000

Myanmar has been in a stage of rapid transition throughout the past couple of years with advancements in development and western trade. However, the Rohingya Muslims, an ethnic minority in the western Rakhine State of Burma, have remained one of the most persecuted minorities in the world. June 11, 2012 marked the first in a series of “The Rahkine State riots”, conflicts between Rahkine Buddhists and the Muslim minority, leaving approximately 100,000 Muslims displaced and living in internal displacement camps. They are jobless, living in makeshift tents, and surviving on rations from NGO’s and private donors. Issues surrounding sanitation, nutrition and healthcare are serious problems these people are facing. The Rohingyas struggle between wanting resettlement and wanting to move to a more welcoming country. They have been stripped of their human rights and this essay aims to document the prolonged deterioration of their freedoms instead of the select instances of violence.

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Sample media
Rohingya #20
Maungdaw
By Lauren DeCicca
01 Jan 2000

Myanmar has been in a stage of rapid transition throughout the past couple of years with advancements in development and western trade. However, the Rohingya Muslims, an ethnic minority in the western Rakhine State of Burma, have remained one of the most persecuted minorities in the world. June 11, 2012 marked the first in a series of “The Rahkine State riots”, conflicts between Rahkine Buddhists and the Muslim minority, leaving approximately 100,000 Muslims displaced and living in internal displacement camps. They are jobless, living in makeshift tents, and surviving on rations from NGO’s and private donors. Issues surrounding sanitation, nutrition and healthcare are serious problems these people are facing. The Rohingyas struggle between wanting resettlement and wanting to move to a more welcoming country. They have been stripped of their human rights and this essay aims to document the prolonged deterioration of their freedoms instead of the select instances of violence.