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Eric Lartigau and Louane Emera attend...
Tokyo, Japan
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jun 2015

French director Eric Lartigau and French actress and singer Louane Emera attend stage greeting during Film Festival 2015 at Yurakucho Asahi Hall on June 26 2015 in Tokyo, Japan.

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Colonel Claude Mademba
Nimes
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Apr 2015

Colonel Mademba fought in North Africa and Italy with British and French forces as an infantryman against German forces.

"On May 5th 1945, I fired my last shell from my Sherman tank at Hitler's Berghof complex," he said.

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Lahcen Majid
Saint Remi
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Apr 2015

Lahcen Majid fought as an infantrymen in Italy as part of a Moroccan outfit attached to Free French forces, against the German army.

"On May 11th 1944, right before the last major push for Monte Cassino, I saw the entire countryside light up with an artillery barrage," he said. "By 2:00 a.m. hundreds of Allied soldiers were already arriving at our hospital to be treated."

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Joel D. Pasado
Los Angeles, CA
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Apr 2015

Joel D. Pasado was a rebel fighter in the Philippines against Japanese forces.

"We surrounded the hospital," he said. "The defenders fought hard, as they had to fight room to room throwing grenades and using bayonets. On one occasion I stormed a room filled with Japanese soldiers. One tried to stab me, but was shot by one of my soldiers and was killed. He saved my life."

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Portrait of a Generation: WWII Vetera...
New York City, NY
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
07 Apr 2015

The Second World War was fought by an entire generation of men from more than 60 nations. Americans, Canadians, Russian, British, Chinese, South Africans and many others fought the Japanese, Spaniards, Italians, Germans, Slovaks and more, all were embroiled in a war which killed over 50 millions soldiers and civilians alike, making this conflict the bloodiest in Human history. The 1921/22-generation is today often known as a sacrificed generation, which fought for a various array of beliefs all intertwined in self-sacrifice and honor. In Germany alone 5.2 million soldiers were killed or missing in battle in a six-year period, Japan lost over 2 million men in combat, while the United States suffered 409 thousand men killed in action. However Russia holds the morbid record, with more than 10 million killed between 1941 and 1945. These astounding numbers show the brutality in which this war was fought in the air, on land and in the seas.

As a journalist, always in search for a certain historical truth within today’s framework, the stories of each of these men interviewed and photographed is a treasure of human perseverance. The project contains no pretense to judge or criticize the actions or decisions taken by these men, but it is rather a recollection of a period drastically different from ours. Their testimony is relevant in a historical sense, which should not be lost in time, as the next generations to come can and should learn from this generation.

The project itself differs from other veteran type shoots, in the sense that it tries to combine so many different nationalities. This combination was hard to achieve. It took no less than 5 years and travels to over 12 countries to meet, photograph, and interview these men. As a photojournalist, it was not only the photo shoot that was interesting, but also the search to meet these veterans, especially the ex Waffen SS and the foreign elements who fought within its ranks; and the more obscure nationalities who fought alongside major powers, like Croatians or Senegalese.

The photography project deals with as many nationalities as possible, for the simple reason that many nations were involved in the fighting. So far I have photographed Germans, Russians, Armenians, Karabastis, French, Belgium, Poles, Americans, Nepalese, Croatian, Czechs, Latvians, Japanese Americans, Pilipino, Hungarians and more…, which includes 221 men from 59 different nationalities.  Each man is interviewed on his experience through out the war. The goal of this project is to reunite as many veterans as possible from most of the nations involved in the Second World War.

FULL ARTICLE AND INTERVIEWS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Villains, Goblins and Ghouls: Cairo's...
Cairo
By Lewis
15 Feb 2015

February 7, 2015
Cairo, Eygpt

Cosplay, a portmanteau of costume and play, emerged as a popular hobby in Japan during the 1990s and quickly became a symbol of Japanese popular culture across Asia and the US. Borrowing stylistic elements of anime, comics, and gaming culture, cosplayers take on the appearance of their favorite fictional characters.

In recent months, the activity has gained significant traction in Egypt, spawning small communities from Mansoura to Alexandria and Cairo. As the 2nd edition of EgyCon commences this weekend, we will be looking at the people sharing in this new-found identity. EgyCon is the name of the cosplay convention series in Egypt whose main goal is to spread anime and manga culture throughout the country. But as Egyptian youth blur the border between fantasy and reality, what are the social impacts and challenges of engaging in cosplay in a country marked by social conservatism, growing unemployment, and political instability?

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ISIS Interviews on Japanese Hostage A...
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
28 Jan 2015

Raqqa, Syria

January 28, 2015

ISIS fighters in Raqqa who come from various countries give their views on the Japanese hostage crisis.

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Jordanian Pilot’s Father Wants Son Tr...
Amman
By hamzaeqab
27 Jan 2015

Amman, Jordan
January 27, 2015

The father of Jordanian pilot Moath al-Kasasbeh, who is held by ISIS, demanded that the Jordanian government releases Sajida al-Rishawai, a woman affiliated with al-Qaeda who tried to commit a suicide attack in 2005, in a bid to facilitate his son’s release.

The father, Safi al-Kasasbeh, spoke during a sit-in organised by the Kasasbeh, Bani Sakhr, Abbadi and Tarawneh clans.

ISIS threatened to execute Moath Kasasbeh and Japanese hostage Kenji Goto if the Jordanian government did not release Rishawi.

Social media accounts affiliated with ISIS members have mentioned that Sajida al-Rishawi, who was imprisoned after failing to commit a suicide attack against a hotel in Amman, was given to Iraqi mediators from the influential Dulaimai clan in preparation of releasing her.
The Jordanian society is tribal. Clan leaders can usually pressure the government into fulfilling their demands.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Safi al-Kasasbeh, Father of Jordanian pilot held by ISIS

We ask the government very strongly and loudly, God willing this have effect on the ground… if Moath comes under any threat, we will hold the government responsible, from the top of the ruling pyramid downward. We will hold them responsible of whatever happens to Moath. This is a very difficult phase. I ask His Majesty the King, the armed forces and every official to start working as fast as possible to liberate Moath by setting free all the political prisoners in Jordan. They are demanding that Sajida al-Rishawi be set free; Sajida al-Rishawi is not worth Moath’s shoe. Why are we keeping Sajida al-Rishawi? She is a criminal who blew up a hotel while we are keeping her and paying her living expenses. Why would she not be released? Why would she not be exchanged? I demand the government to release Sajida al-Rishawi immediately.

From the first day… Moath has been detained for 36 days, and the government hid from us the actions it said it was taking. We found out that there were no actions of negotiations. We do not accept this. These times are very difficult and the government must act accordingly.
Unseen man: This process takes time. It cannot be done in five minutes.

We now have time. The government must send someone to let us know what they have done in order for to know our son’s fate. He is a military who was sent to carry out a military mission. We will hold responsible the people who sent Moath on this mission. Moath’s blood is very, very dear.
Unseen man: Did they not tell you about what is going on?
No they did not.

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Shibuya: An Icon of Japanese Modernity
Tokyo
By Michael Penn
27 Sep 2014

Shibuya Station and its surrounding neighbourhoods is undoubtedly one of the most famous areas in Tokyo, known especially as a centre for fashion and youth culture. The crowds traversing Shibuya Crossing, right in front of the train station, is an iconic image of modern Japan, often used to represent the nation’s transformation from the ashes of defeat in 1945 to the economic superpower of the 1980s.

Indeed, you can find all kinds of people here in Shibuya. Equally well known is the statue of the loyal dog Hachiko, who waited in vain for his dead master for many years at this very spot, tugging at the heartstrings of a nation. Nowadays, the area around the statue is Japan’s most appropriate location to await ones friends before going shopping or eating or whatever in Shibuya’s extensive commercial district.

While there are very few parts of Japan that are active 24 hours a day, Shibuya Crossing comes pretty close. As impressive as it is by day, the night view can be even more spectacular. At different seasons and at different times, it is a district of change. Even many of the shops along its streets go out business, face renewal, or introduce the completely original.

Center Gai is at the heart of the shopping district, and is thankfully a pedestrian zone. This a place where people — mostly young people — buy clothes, jewelry, or else go for entertainment or a bite to eat. Here it runs from highbrow to lowbrow… there’s just no telling what you might discover.

Nearby is Supein Zaka, which is supposedly similar in appearance to a traditional Spanish street.

Behind the trendy Shibuya Ichi Maru Kyu shopping complex is a zone that probably could exist in few places other than Japan. This is Love Hotel Hill where couples go for rooms available for two or three hour periods. There is not much of a “rest” happening in these hotel rooms.

Although the word “Shibuya” is most closely associated with the Shibuya Station area and its surrounding commercial district, it is also part of a larger Shibuya City, which is one of the 23 special wards of Tokyo, making up the core of this megacity. Shibuya City has a resident population of over 210,000 people, and its own city government and its own flag. Harajuku, Yoyogi, Ebisu, and Hiroo are neighbourhoods well known in their own right that also belong to Shibuya City. On its northern border, Shibuya City runs right up to Shinjuku Station, meaning that such a major shopping complexes as Takashimaya Times Square is actually part of Shibuya City, not Shinjuku City as one might naturally assume.

But be that as it may, for most visitors to Japan — as for most Japanese themselves — Shibuya is that youthful, ever-changing zone where the crowds spill out at the change of a signal and where the faithful dog Hachiko watches over his waiting friends.

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Lawrence Repeta on Japan’s New Secrec...
Tokyo, Japan
By Michael Penn
03 Sep 2014

Up to ten years in prison for leakers? Up to five years in prison for investigative journalists? No protection for whistleblowers? No clear standards for prosecution? This is not some dark Orwellian fantasy, but rather a law that was passed by the Shinzo Abe administration in December 2013. The law is slated to come into effect in December of 2014. Professor Lawrence Repeta of Meiji University gives a lucid and revealing account of the Japanese government’s war against transparency and political accountability.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
07 Aug 2014

“Matsuri” (Japanese for “festivals” or “holidays”) are at the centre of Japanese culture. They are a reminder of the country’s traditions and cultural past. Every city or village in Japan has at least one matsuri per year. These festivals, many of which originate from traditional Chinese festivals, are held between spring and autumn and are based around the rice-growing cycle. Celebrated in local shrines or temples, matsuri have their origins in ancient Shinto rituals and beliefs. At the beginning of August, the city of Kamakura, the ancient capital of Japan, celebrates the Bonbori festival in the Tsurugaoka Hachiman-gu temple. During the celebration, hundreds of bondori (a traditional Japanese lamp with a paper shade) are lined up along the pathway to the shrine. Each festival has its own characteristics such as decorated floats pulled through the town, drums and flute music, and traditional Japanese performance art.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

A little girl reads the omikuji (also called mikuji) with her father. The omikuji is a small piece of paper containing a prediction from the divine oracle, that can be obtained, during the special festivities, at Shinto and Buddhist shrines in Japan. It supposedly lets people know their fate (life, health, work, love.). It literally means "sacred lottery" and is received blindly from a box that is shaken, in the hope that the divination is good. The rolled up omikuji falls out of a small hole. Unroll the paper to reveal the divination written on it, which could be one of the following: Great blessing (dai-kichi, 大吉), Media blessing (chū-kichi, 中 吉), Small blessing (shō-kichi, 小 吉) blessing (kichi, 吉), Half-blessing (han-kichi, 半 吉), Quasi-blessing (sue-kichi, 末 吉), Quasi-small-blessing (sue-shō-kichi, 末 小 吉), Curse (kyō, 凶), Small-curse (shō-kyō, 小 凶), Half-curse (han-kyō, 半 凶), Quasi-curse (sue-kyō, 末 凶), Great curse (dai-kyō, 大 凶).

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

After reading, the omikuji (paper fortune) is tied in a knot to make its prediction come true.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

400 bonbori illuminate the garden of the Tsurugaoka Hachiman-gu Shinto temple in Kamakura, Kanagawa, the ancient capital of Japan.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

When the sun rises, priestesses light up Bonbori with the sacred fire. Bonbori can be drawn or written on with Kanji characters and are of Chinese origin.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

At the beginning of August there are celebrations in Tsurugaoka Hachiman-gu in Kamakura, Kanagawa, the ancient capital of Japan. Bonbori, a type of Japanese lamp made from paper, are used in the festivities, They are painted by artists, writers, poets, and illustrators. Around 400 lanterns are created for the occasion and placed on the floor of the sanctuary.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

The sales counter displaying dell'omikuji and objects for good luck.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

In addition to admiring the bonbori, at these festivals you can see the traditional Japanese dance, Nihon Budou. The dance is takes place in the temple in which the famous ballerina Shizukagozen (1165-1211) and Lady Shizuka, one of the most famous women in Japanese history and literature, performed.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

Behind the exposed bondori there are barrels of Sake donated to the temple. Sake is considered a sacred drink in Japan.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

The path leading to the Tsurugaoka Hachiman-gū temple, illuminated by bonbori lanterns.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

One of the Bonbori designed with a stylized Kanji. The symbol means 'the flower'.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

The bonbori are made from wooden frames covered with Japanese paper.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

At these festivals, in addition to admiring the bonbori, you can see the traditional Japanese dance, Nihon Budou. The dance is takes place in the temple in which the famous ballerina Shizukagozen (1165-1211) and Lady Shizuka, one of the most famous women in Japanese history and literature, performed.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

The Shinto prayer is performed by throwing coins in a box placed at the front of the temple.

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The Bonbori Festival of Kamakura in J...
Kamakura
By Alessandro Di Ciommo
06 Aug 2014

An important element for visitors of the Shinto temple is Chozu-sha, the tank where you wash your hands before you go to pray.

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary of Tsunami
Fukushima, Japan
By U.S. Editor
11 Mar 2013

March 11, 2013, memorial services were held for the two-year anniversary of 3.11 across northern Japan. Two years after 3.11, some things have changed but many problems remain in disaster areas. Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant that caused an serious accident is still in hazardous condition. People who used to live in No-Go-Zone have not been able to go back to their hometowns. The decontamination plan for a huge contaminated area by radiation is late. Also, home rebuilding efforts are slow. However, in such severe situation, the people do not forget to pray for the victims of 3.11.

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Miyagi, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

People pray for the victims of the tsunami at the shore from where the tsunami came to mark the second anniversary of 3.11. Minamisoma, Fukushima, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Miyagi, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

A man prays for the victims at the shore from where the tsunami came on the second anniversary of 3.11.
Minamisoma, Fukushima, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Miyagi, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

An old women who lost six relatives in the tsunami prays for them in front of a grave on the second anniversary day of 3.11. Minamisoma, Fukushima, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Miyagi, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

A flower someone offered at a shore where the tsunami came from.
Minamisoma, Fukushima, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Fukushima, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

The mayor of Namie town, Baba prays for the victims of the tsunami in Namie town's memorial service in Nihonmatsu where Namie temporary city hall is. People who used to live in Namie have not been able to return to their hometown because Namie town is still appointed as a No-Go Zone.
Nihonmatsu, Fukushima, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Fukushima, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

People pray for the victims of the tsunami in Namie town's memorial service in Nihonmatsu where Namie temporary city hall is. People who used to live in Namie have not been able to return to their hometown because Namie town is still appointed as a No-Go Zone.
Nihonmatsu, Fukushima, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Fukushima, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

People pray for the victims of the tsunami in Namie town's memorial service in Nihonmatsu where the Namie temporary city hall is. People who used to live in Namie have not been able to return to their hometown because Namie town is still appointed as a No-Go Zone.
Nihonmatsu, Fukushima, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Fukushima, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

Staff of the Namie fire department who still search for victims of the tsunami attend Namie town's memorial service in Nihonmatsu where the Namie temporary city hall is. People who used to live in Namie have not been able to return to their hometown because Namie town is still appointed as a No-Go Zone.
Nihonmatsu, Fukushima, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Fukushima, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

A girl who lost her friend to the tsunami reads a message of condolence in Namie-town's memorial service in Nihonmatsu where Namie's temporary city hall is. People who used to live in Namie have not been able to come back to their hometown because the town is still designated a No-Go Zone.
Nihonmatsu, Fukushima, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Miyagi, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

A large ship that was washed ashore by the tsunami and a flower given as an offering. Kesennuma, Miyagi, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Miyagi, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

An apartment destroyed by the tusnami and a green cover shielding a new apartment under construction . Minamisanriku, Miyagi, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Miyagi, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

A disaster area on the shoreline where the tsunami hit.
Minamisanriku, Miyagi, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Miyagi, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

A guardian diety of children and flowers offered as a memorial marking the two year anniversary of the tsunami in Japan. Ishinomaki, Miyagi, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013