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Tajik Women 01
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
21 Nov 2014

Gulguna is having her lunch, shir tchai with her neighbors in the winter room.

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Tajik Women 17
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
21 Nov 2014

Her daughter is serving a tea. Odinamo spent all her life in Roshorv. She is the mother of 9 children. Two daughters still live with them. She also takes care of her two grandchildren as their parents work in Khorog, a 7 hour drive away. Her older grandson helps her with grazing her herd.

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Tajik Women 04
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
19 Nov 2014

She does her homework after school. Behind, her mum prepares bread for dinner. Lessons in primary school are mixed. Ismailis do not have a madrasa, the Koranic school. At school, she learns Russian and Tajik. She will start learning English at secondary school. In the Bartang Valley, people speak their own Rushan language. It is spoken, not written. Two valleys futher to the south is the Wakhan Corridor, but Bartangi and Wakhani peoples can’t understand each other.

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Tajik Women 07
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
19 Nov 2014

Afternoon bath. Mum prepared tubs of hot water.

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Tajik Women 08
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
19 Nov 2014

After the bath mum arranges Gulguna’s braids. Children are loved here because they are a blessing of God.

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Tajik Women 05
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
18 Nov 2014

One of Gulguna’s duties is herding goats in the evening .This task is reserved for the children. A dog starts barking so she looks out for a wolf.

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Tajik Women 06
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
18 Nov 2014

Gulguna and her friends bring a goat to the village to find out to who it belonged. There are 7 to 10 big herds in the village. In one herd, there are around 10 to 15 smaller groups each owned by a local. Shepherds switch their turns for grazing their herds.

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Tajik Women 11
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
18 Nov 2014

Nigina studies Esperanto in Khorog. She came to be bridesmaid at her friend’s wedding. hers sister is en anglish teacher at local school. her brother just came back from his studies in london

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Tajik Women 20
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
16 Nov 2014

A dance leader is singing wedding songs. Songs are about the Badakshan and Pamir Mountains, not about Tajikistan as the Pamir was there before the rise of the Tajik state. A wedding ceremony takes place at the bride’s home. If the young couple comes from the same village, a ceremony starts at a bride’s house and afterwards moves to the groom’s house.

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Tajik Women 22
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
16 Nov 2014

Nigina, a bridesmaid is dancing. According to custom, the best dancers receive gifts such as home-made socks, necklaces or simply money.

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Tajik Women 21
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
15 Nov 2014

A wedding ceremony takes place in the big summer room. Guests dance in pairs and then they leave the dance floor for the next. A wedding ceremony takes place at the bride’s home. If the young couple comes from the same village, a ceremony starts at a bride’s house and afterwards moves to the groom’s house.

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Tajik Women 23
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
15 Nov 2014

The wedding guests. Anyone who wants to come is welcome. Hopefully there will be just enough space to dance.

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Tajik Women 15
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
15 Nov 2014

Granny Odinamo lives in the oldest house in the village. The house is so old that no one remembers when it was built. It could be a century or perhaps two centuries old. The house was formerly part of a defensive fortress, destroyed by the Soviets.

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Tajik Women 18
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
15 Nov 2014

Odinamo is 55 years old, her husband is 59. The wind has ravaged their faces. Odinamo prepares tobacco powder to be put under the tongue.

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Tajik Women 13
Roshorv, Tajikistan
By karolinasamborska
13 Nov 2014

Wood in Roshorv is precious, because it is rare. The Pamir is a mountainous desert and except for a few poplars and willows nothing will to grow. Women pick up all branches and twigs, sweep leaves and stalks and put everything in a stove. Men get up at dawn and set off into the mountains in search of firewood. It is hard to find something bigger than twigs and small branches. Men wander kilometers collecting anything that will burn. To get thicker wood they need to ride two days away, to the border with Kyrgyzstan. Therefore hills, farms and farmland are tidy as like an English garden. The spaces are wild and natural, but you will not find a withered twig.

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Another Afghanistan
Kabul
By karolinasamborska
27 Sep 2014

There is always a paradox in war; that it shows us how life continues. This is a reflection, a look at Afghanistan, but not the one we already know well from war, the Taliban and women who wear the burqa. It focuses instead on the people who - in the presence of war which offers only uncertainty and violence - have the courage to live, smile and walk calmly in the streets. The photos examine how everyday life is negotiated despite major political dramas, how people manage to find everyday joy, pleasure, beauty, poetry, rap and freedom. Tired of wars, these people try to live in peace. At least they pretend to live in peace. They are born, they die, they love, windows tremble, bombs continue to explode, but children continue to go to school. Life goes on.

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Drying laundry
Tunis,
By Sarah Mersch
26 Jul 2012

hang up on a window in the old city of Tunis

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Tunisian landscapes
Tunisia
By Sarah Mersch
27 Mar 2010

Pictures from various regions of the country, from traditional housings in the South over Roman ruins and Mediterranean landscapes to every day life in the old cities. Throughout the Tunisian history, many civilisations have passed through the country, from the original Berber population, Phenicians and Romans, to Arabs and Maures, Ottomans, Italians, Maltese and French, each of them leaving their traces that today built the modern Tunisia.

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The People Of Pingelap
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By U.S. Editor
02 Apr 2008

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.