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Nattali Rize
Bersenbrück
By Ralf Falbe
30 Jul 2016

Top Act Nattali Rize (Australia) performes at the Reggae Jam Festival in Bersenbrück, Germany.

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Walter Trout & Band
Hamburg
By Ralf Falbe
01 Dec 2015

Blues Rocker Walter Trout and his band perform live at the club Fabrik in Hamburg, Germany.

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Chris Norman
Hamburg
By Ralf Falbe
15 Nov 2015

Chris Norman, former lead singer of the band 'Smokie', performs with the Chris Norman Band at the club Grosse Freiheit 36 in Hamburg, Germany on November 15, 2015.

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Brain Drain: Syria's Skilled Youth St...
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

2015

Berlin, Germany

Syria’s brightest minds have been forced to leave the war-torn country for Europe to try to make a new a life for themselves. Doctors, engineers, and artists are among those who flee to Germany. In January and Febraury alone, the EU member state received 10,175 asylum requests from Syrians, according to the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees. However, in Germany these young talented people have to deal with long bureaucratic processes, marginalization and the hurdles of learning a difficult language.

These photos profile young, skilled Syrians who are trying to create new lives for themselves in Berlin. 

ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Brain Drain 2
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Naabeel, 30, from Aleppo, computer engineer, graduated after a five-years course at the Mamoun Private University for Science and Technology in Aleppo and worked in Egypt in a textile company. He sits on the bench waiting for his turn to register as refugee in Berlin.

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Brain Drain 3
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Moustaf and Nabeel in the emergency facility for refugees in Krupp Street, Moabit, Berlin's north western suburb. They met for the first time in Berlin and now they share the same room in the facility.

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Brain Drain 4
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Moustaf entertains a Syrian child on the football pitch, which was converted into an emergency facility tent.

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Brain Drain 5
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Nabeel helps another refugee from Syria translate a message from the Berlin immigration authorities relating to a doctor's appointment for his wife, who suffers from a kidney disfunction. Nabeel volunteers in the refugee camp to help members of the Syrian community.

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Brain Drain 6
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Nabeel enjoys Mateh tea with other members of the Syrian community, which comprise the majority in the refugee facility.

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Brain Drain 7
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Moustaf inside the refugee camp refreshes himself with a glass of water. There are no activities to carry on doing during the day in the refugee facility.

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Brain Drain 8
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Omar,25, from Aleppo, had his own music studio where he self-produced Arabic hip hop music.
He earned a baccalaureate in English-Arabic translation and, before opening the studio, he worked for a small advertisement company with two other graphic designers. German authorities have granted him a two year residency permit that allows him to work or rent an apartment.

"I haven’t looked for a job", he said. "For me the priority is to study German or to find a scholarship at university. I am learning German here and it is my third week."

Omar is the courtyard of the refugee facility in Marienfelde, Berlin. During the Cold War, this facility was used to accommodate refugees coming from East Germany.
"Here for six months I have been doing nothing," he said. "Come on, it is Germany, if I finish to sort out my documents within six months that means that I am very lucky. There is lot of bureaucracy."

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Brain Drain 9
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Omar rolls a cigarette in the courtyard of the refugee camp.

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Brain Drain 10
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Omar talks with a young Syrian in the refugee camp.

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Brain Drain 12
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Omar with the wife Louise, 24, from France, in the kitchen of their small apartment inside the refugee camp. "I feel my priority now it is to find flat for me and my wife," he said. "It is really hard: either you find something at the end of the world in Berlin and you need one and half hour to reach the city, or there is no chance. Who is paying for our rent is not us, [it] is the job center, so would you prefer a person with a job or someone the jobcenter is paying for and you don’t know then when the job center stops providing support? We have really strict and hard conditions we have to go through."

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Brain Drain 11
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan, 32, dentist from Hama, studied three years at the university of Baghdad and three years at the college of dentistry in Damascus. She worked in Damascus in a state health centre for two years. She wants to work as a dentist in Berlin, but before doing so she needs to equalize her degree to the German education standard.

Razan is with other Syrian refugees and schoolmates waiting to start a German lesson. She attends a course to learn the German language four days a week from 2pm to 5pm.

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Brain Drain 14
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan sits on the stairs at the school entrance in Kreuzberg, Berlin's southern suburb, reading the grammar book that she uses to learn the German language.

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Brain Drain 15
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan talks with a schoolmate in the classroom while the German lesson is about to start. The classmates are also refugees.

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Brain Drain 17
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

After attending German class, Razan meets a friend near the school in Kreuzberg. She talks with animosity about the demonstration organized in Berlin to remember the fourth anniversary of the uprising in Syria.

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Brain Drain 16
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan awaits for the bus to go home near Goerlitzer Park.

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Brain Drain 20
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan returns to home. She sits on the sofa in the kitchen and speaks with the mother via Skype. Her family lives in Cairo, Egypt and she has applied for an Egyptian visa to be able to visit them.

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Brain Drain 19
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan cries while talking to her mother via Skype. She has been away from her family for the past year.

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Brain Drain 18
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan recovers from the tears while speaking with the mother in Egypt.

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Brain Drain 13
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan talks on the phone with a Syrian friend in the presence of her flatmate.

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Brain Drain 1
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
18 Mar 2015

Moustaf Aljundi, 26, from Homs . Educated in England, Cambridge, a degree in human resources management and professional basketball player, Moustaf returned to Syria to work for a company in the human resources department and played with the Syrian national basket team. He sits on a bench waiting for his turn to register as a refugee in front of LAGeSo (Landesamt fuer Gesundheit und Soziale) the operative arm of the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs of the State of Berlin.

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Ukraine: A Ritual Bath in the Frigid ...
Izmail, Ukraine
By danubestory
19 Jan 2014

On the 19th of January, Ukrainian Orthodox Christians observe a special tradition aimed at washing away all their sins and securing good health. One by one they enter the frigid water of a river or lake and submerge themselves three times. In the town of Izmail, this ritual is performed on the banks of the river Danube. In the past, only men bathed in the icy river. Now, ladies also plunge into the cold of the river. On the beach it seems like a hot summer day: ladies in bikinis gather and laugh. However, people well dressed in winter coats remind one of the cold January weather.

Christening, called “Krescenie“ in Ukrainian, is not just about bathing. People meet on the banks of the river and have barbecues, grilling meat, drinking and socializing. Musicians are always nearby. With mulled wine and vodka, the faithful soon forget the cold weather.

Andrey Stefoglo, resident of Izmail, was born with his left hand deformed. Nonetheless, he found work as a hotel manager on a German cruise ship. He is among the luckier of Izmail’s people: he has a good job. The region is poor, being nearly forgotten after the collapse of Soviet Union. People here usually speak Russian. The area was once called Besarabia, and over time, belonged to the Ottoman Empire, Romania and Russia. Here, people of forty ethnic groups and nationalities coexist without any problems.

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Lake Malawi - turbulent times in quie...
senga bay
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

Local musician wait for tourists outside of the lake shore lodges to try to get some extra money selling or playing instruments.

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Chapulling Generation, Occupy Gezi Pa...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Francesco Pistilli
08 Jun 2013

Gokben. Age 35. Marketing operator.

"I started to go to Gezi Park on May 31st. We just want our freedom. We are against prohibitions. We are against the government policy about terrorists and terrorism. The president makes deals with heads of terrorist organizations and we don't accept that. He sells Turkish companies to foreign companies. He hates Ataturk and he tries to destroy Ataturk's principles, works, etc. He cuts trees to make buildings and his aim is to earn lots of money for his family and his supporters. He wants everybody to think like him, behave like him, and live like him. It is not possible. There are many reasons why we want the government to resign.
We collected garbage in Gezi Park. We sang a song. We ate lunch and dinner together. We bought water, bread, chocolate, litter bags and medicine for our friends who are sleeping at night in Gezi Park.I am working so that I can go after my job and during weekends."

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Not a Dreamland: Artists and Subcultu...
Gaza
By Anne Paq
30 Dec 2012

2012-1013
Gaza, Palestinian Territories

When we think of Gaza, we tend to associate it with death, destruction, misery, rockets and Hamas. The overall realities of Gaza are indeed rather grim: this tiny coastal strip has grown into an open-air prison consisting of around 1.5 million Palestinians, most of whom are refugees. They have zero control over their borders and airspace, and have very limited access to the Mediterranean Sea which so prominently characterizes this tiny strip of Palestine. The siege, which negatively affects all freedom of movement of persons and goods to and from the Gaza Strip, has exacerbated the already dire economic situation as well as severely limited any cultural or academic development. Restrictions of many aspects of social and cultural life imposed by the current Hamas government and the large-scale dependency of most of the population on international aid, leaves Palestinians in Gaza feeling suffocated and helpless.

Amid all this despair, however, there are those who keep finding powerful expressions of their lust for life, their spirit and their strength.

Through hip-hop, break-dancing, parkour, surfing and other creative endeavors, they manifest their thirst for freedom and use these activities as a form of resistance. In the absence of adequate equipment or facilities and in the face of growing conservatism in their society, they improvise. Underneath the more known images of violence and despair, these people provide a glimpse of the vibrant sparks of freedom in Gaza.

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Laolu Sebanjo Afromysterics Art
Abuja, Nigeria
By Taiwo Adeleke
01 Dec 2012

Name: Afromystrerics Art.

Journalist: Taiwo Adeleke

CUE:
A Nigerian born Artist and musician use his works of art to interpret the mystery of the African thought pattern and the weak economics situation in Nigeria from the fuel scarcity, crisis and killings , political power tussle and the challenges of Africa Artist at large. Images and soundbite of people at the art exhibition.

Headline:
Artist use his work of art to interpret the Economic situation in Nigeria and Africa at Large.

SLUG:
RAW-NIGERIA-ART

SYNTHE:
Timi Inekoba (Woman) Participant at the Exhibition
Stanley Ibansu (man) Business man Participant at the Art Exhibition
Laolu Senbanjo (man) Artist / Musician

SHOTLIST:

ABUJA, NIGERIA, NOVEMBER 30, 2012, AT THE ART EXHIBITION
ABUJA NIGERIA, DECEMBER 02, 2012 AT THE MUSIC CONCERT

VAR of a Artist drawing
VAR of Artist art exhibition in Abuja
VAR of people registering at the Art exhibition
VAR of Artist show casing his Art work to Audience
VAR of Artist playing is Guitar and singing to the audience
VAR of Artist Playing his music alone in the garden.
VAR of Artist at his music Concert in Abuja at the city park Abuja Nigeria

SOUNBITE:1 Timi Inekoba (Woman). Participant at the Art Exhibition ( English, 00:00:07:24 ). "My second favorite pieces is about the visual cycle, all the random things that as been going on in Nigeria, the subsidy things, the oil thing, the corruption thing is like he just recycle everything. Am pretty sure you know its art and music it comes together, so he translate everything from art to music , music to art. I think this will stand any were and its good. i like his art because its abstract, its beautiful, its something else,but i think it we go very far".

SOUNDBITE 2 : Stanley Ibansu (man) Business man Participant at the Art Exhibition. (00:00:51:17) "A picture speaks volume. i mean in thousand words , now pictures is in millions of words his art speaks millions of words , its mind blowing , i love what he does, most of what he as done envoy round the women fold , and all this while, why the event was going on i was thinking about why the women but you know discover that its actually the women its a woman world,everything involve around the woman , he has been able to, i had something very peculiar today somebody said that if you are able to change the woman, 80% of the challenges we have in the society is handle and that is the truth. What he is doing is affecting the women fold and i must tell you this is cutting across the change we expect and to tell you the truth he is making the impact that is needed with that ".

SOUNDBITE 3: Laolu Senbanjo (man) Artist / Musician. ( 00:00:47:08)
"My name is Laolu Senbanjo and am an artist and also a musician, my style of art is called Afromysterics art which simply means the mystery of Africa thought pattern, and what i do is hat i like to use my art to interpret different scenario and situations. I draw inspiration from methodology, symbols, Africa life, the Africa third pattern, everyday life and you know what we do is a narrative of a busy mind. An African mind is very busy is thinking of many things at the same time, so with this i try to tell you a lot of stories with just one picture, i take you through a story in a particular painting.

After having exhibitions outside the shore of Nigeria, i have been to few exhibitions am in a position to compare and contrast what the acceptance is like, you know you cant compare the monetary value in terms of appreciation in terms of the value of the artist itself. We in Africa, we need to do more , we need to value our artist and treat therm better because its sad to know that a lot of artist don't even have art galleries.

the major challenges is that of perceptive and understanding of what art is and a lot of people, like i tell people you don't pay an artist for his labour, he is not a laborer, you pay an artist for his site and ability to see what you cant see and put it in imagination on canvas ability to connect what is in your mind to your art. That is what people should value and that is priceless in the sense that when you see a work of art you see people price it like its a commodity like tomatoes and its very heart breaking sometimes the way we treat our own artist and this is something that is absence somewhere like i had exhibition in Germany , the artist are treated with respect and dignity and you know what ever costs a work is the value behind the work , basically you cant price art.

Afromysterics is going on loud , we are launching out and what we want is to take the message of our people , we want to take it to the world in charcoal something that the world have not seen, we want to take it out in a very unique manner, there is notting fetish or demonic about africa art, we should stop demonizing our history , our root because that is what saddens me the most , because most people see carving, mask , they start saying its as this and that , many people have been brain watched, and its painful , very very painful, i menthes are beautiful things that is been appreciated globally , this is what makes us unique, i mean while should be more European than an European, i mean he doesn't want to see the like of Michelangelo , Da vinci, of this world, i mean while not do what is natural to you , we have our styles of art , we have what cones to us naturally and the reasons while am doing this is that , this is what comes to me , this is what i feel, this is what i imagine and this is what am dreaming , i mean my art , i that is what am actually doing here i just sit down and let it flow that as been my life i let it flow."

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Vampos
Kampala, Uganda
By Amy Hume
05 Feb 2011

Musician Vampos at Buzz Festival in Kampala.

Hip Hop is a global phenomena that reaches nearly all corners of the Earth. Starting in the projects of NYC nearly 40 years ago, struggling youth from Mongolia to Rwanda use music as a weapon to express their situations, hopes, and dreams. Though Hip Hop culture is new to Uganda, it is becoming popular with people of all ages, but with the youth in particular. Hip Hop music is reaching the smallest of villages, as I witnessed in the war-torn area of Gulu. Access to music is free, which is an essential aspect of why Hip Hop is spreading like wildfire.
In 2009, End of the Weak (EOW), a collaboration of MCs, graffiti artists, break dancers and DJs that spans 17 countries, reached Uganda. All chapters of EOW are involved with community outreach, workshops for youth and exude positive influence in their communities through Hip Hop culture. The MC Challenge is a competition in each country wherein the winners gather at the World Finals, which are held in a different country each year. The MC Challenge is held in the central, eastern, western and northern regions of Uganda so that many different languages are represented in the competition. Winners of the MC Challenge are provided studio time, video production and photo shoots as a way to share and promote their music.

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"Hustla" video shoot
Kawempe, Uganda
By Amy Hume
30 Dec 2010

3RDi from Venice, CA shoots the video for Twiggy, a prominent female rapper from Uganda. In Kawempe, UG.

Hip Hop is a global phenomena that reaches nearly all corners of the Earth. Starting in the projects of NYC nearly 40 years ago, struggling youth from Mongolia to Rwanda use music as a weapon to express their situations, hopes, and dreams. Though Hip Hop culture is new to Uganda, it is becoming popular with people of all ages, but with the youth in particular. Hip Hop music is reaching the smallest of villages, as I witnessed in the war-torn area of Gulu. Access to music is free, which is an essential aspect of why Hip Hop is spreading like wildfire.
In 2009, End of the Weak (EOW), a collaboration of MCs, graffiti artists, break dancers and DJs that spans 17 countries, reached Uganda. All chapters of EOW are involved with community outreach, workshops for youth and exude positive influence in their communities through Hip Hop culture. The MC Challenge is a competition in each country wherein the winners gather at the World Finals, which are held in a different country each year. The MC Challenge is held in the central, eastern, western and northern regions of Uganda so that many different languages are represented in the competition. Winners of the MC Challenge are provided studio time, video production and photo shoots as a way to share and promote their music.