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DJI_0203
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
05 Apr 2018

New Residential buildings seen under construction in the Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

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DJI_0179
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
01 Apr 2018

New Residential buildings seen under construction in the Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

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DJI_0175
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
01 Apr 2018

New Residential buildings seen under construction in the Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

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DJI_0181
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
01 Apr 2018

New Residential buildings seen under construction in the Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

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Made in China Container Harbor Aerial...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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DJI_0009
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
11 Mar 2018

Hong Kong skyline view seen from Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

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Reviving Canada's Legendary Fur Industry
Canada
By Leyland Cecco
30 Jan 2015

The original currency of Canada, wild fur, is back. Pushed to the shadows for nearly three decades as effective animal welfare movements stigmatized the use of fur for fashion, massive appetite in China has revived the industry. Over the last seven years, Canada has seen a large increase in the foreign demand for both farmed and wild fur pelts. Sales in 2013 exceeded $950 million, a sharp increase. While there is international interest in pelts, economic uncertainty in Russia has resulted in near-total dominance of Chinese buyers at recent auctions. Roughly 90% of wild fur is sold to foreign buyers.

These images trace the movement of fur, from the forest to auction, and then to manufacturing and fashion. There are an estimated 60,000 trappers across Canada who supply pelts to auction. Marten, fisher, mink, coyote, beaver and fox are sold at the world's largest fur auction in Toronto.

At fur stores in Toronto, designers use the material to produce coats worth thousands of dollars. While the number of shops specializing in both design and manufacturing has declined, those still in business can produce items commanding hefty sums. 

While animal rights activists continue to campaign against the use of traps, much of the industry is now heavily regulated by both the federal and provincial governments. Old traps, which often caused animals to struggle, have been phased out, and the majority of trappers now use 'kill traps', which induce death within seconds. While leghold traps are used primarily for larger predators, they are no longer able to pierce the skin of the animal, resulting in reduced suffering. However, not all trappers agree on the use of these traps, highlighting an evolving view on animal treatment within the trapping community. 

There are also concerns that the number of animals being harvested isn't being recorded. While trappers are required to submit numbers each year, the termination of a national Wildlife Pelt Census means the data is often lost in a sea of bureaucracy. 

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Living along Nicaragua’s Grand Canal
Rivas, Nicaragua
By Charlotte Bruneau
22 Jan 2015

A Chinese firm started construction on the Nicaragua Canal in late 2014 in the city of Rivas.  It is considered the world’s latest mega project and one of the largest engineering projects in history, expected to take five years to complete and to cost around 50 billion dollars, raising controversy and environmental concerns.

To win the Nicaraguan people’s support for the planned canal, the government of President Daniel Ortega launched an impressive propaganda campaign claiming that the canal would bring wealth and power to the nation. However, to make way for the canal, as many as 30,000 people will have to be displaced and dozens of villages erased from the map. Environmentalists worry about the ecological costs as well.

Kenny has finished his design degree a couple of months ago. During his studies, he built a model of the canal because he did not really know what it would look like: the most widespread criticism of the canal project is the lack of information provided by the government.

“The model’s design comes out of my imagination,"  explains Kenny while proudly opening and closing his model canal’s locks. "I tried to make sense of the scarce official information we receive. I invited the village’s children to participate in building the model to help them better understand the canal.”

While he is trying to find a job, he works in a car repair workshop. The workers there explain that, although they would like the canal to create employment opportunities for them, the Chinese are importing machines they don’t have the skills to handle. The government’s promise of employment is empty, they say.

“We have to learn how to better organize and protect ourselves," says one of Kenny's co-workers. "Some of us are already being followed by the government and I am sometimes scared to sleep at home. The government tries to scare families into keeping quiet while a number of foreign journalists were already expelled.”

The idea of having a trans-oceanic canal cutting through Nicaragua is hardly revolutionary. More than 150 years ago, the American businessman Cornelius Vanderbilt had already started digging but later stopped the project for lack of enough investors. Others, like the New Spain colonial administration or France’s Napoleon III considered, and later on abandoned, the idea of a Nicaraguan canal.

Now it is the Chinese’s turn to take on the Grand Canal’s challenge: 278 km long and at times 520 meters wide, the canal will allow for bulk carriers to navigate from the Pacific coast to the Caribbean. President Ortega, the former Marxist guerrilla revolutionary, granted the Chinese businessman Wang Jing’s HK Nicaragua Canal Development Investment Co. Ltd (HKND Group) a 50-year concession.  HKND says that the canal would create an estimated 50,000 jobs, but thousands of them would go to Chinese workers.

At the same time, the local population fears that Rivas might become a Chinese town when the Chinese workers arrive, bringing prostitution and high prices as Chinese goods flood the local markets. Indeed, the canal’s project is accompanied by a number of other projects. For instance, the HKND Group will be allowed to establish a number of so-called zonas francas, or tax free zones.

Such agreements between HKND and the Ortega government led a number of critics to assume that Wang Jing secretly acts on behalf of the Chinese government. While Nicaragua and Taiwan have good diplomatic relations, Beijing and Managua do not. Having private investors coming from the Chinese mainland to Nicaragua seems to be an alternative to diplomatic ties as far as business is concerned.

Worried about their future, people from Rivas have started to voice their discontent. Kenny takes us to his cousin’s uncle, Octavio Ortega, who says that the canal’s project has already been triggering opposition among the region’s campesinos (peasants) for two years.

After the opening ceremony for the construction was held on December 22, 2014, Ortega saw his fears materialize. He has since begun organizing a network of protest leaders throughout the country. For having participated in demonstrations, however, Octavio was violently beaten and jailed for over a week. A growing number of peasants who fought for the Sandinistas during the war have distanced themselves from Daniel Ortega’s government, saying he has betrayed them and accusing him of not being a “real Sandinista” anymore.

“We have to learn how to better organize and protect ourselves," says Octavio. "Some of us are already being followed by the government and I am sometimes scared to sleep at home. The government tries to scare families into keeping quiet while a number of foreign journalists were already expelled.”

Octavio explains how land property functions in Nicaragua, how many properties were redistributed during the Sandinista’s era in the 80’s. But now, the government passed a law that legalizes expropriation without compensating the occupants of a piece of land.

People living in the countryside around Rivas have no other choice than self-sustainability. On his patch of land, Ronal has pigs, cows, chicken, sugar cane and a number of vegetables. Although the canal does not pass through his land directly, he will be expropriated to make room for another “side project.” The vicinity of Lake Nicaragua and its pristine shores will be turned into tourist complexes.

Ronal’s family lives in Tolesmaida, close to Lake Nicaragua. Their village will be erased from the map as well. Villagers there show us the scars of the beatings they suffered in jail. On every house’s wall, they have painted Chinese characters reading “Chinese, get out!” The villagers do not only worry about the impact of mass tourism, but about the lake’s ecosystem as well. More pollution, traffic, noise and salinity will gravely endanger the largest freshwater resource in Latin America. Ronal thinks a lot about the social impact of the Chineses’ arrival. For many villagers, the pending arrival of the Chinese often feels like a modern conquistadora.

“I have heard that they worship dragons and animals,” he says. “The Chinese have a religion and customs so different from our that I wonder  whtether a coexistence will be possible Will they remain among themselves without talking to locals? Will they be violent? Will they try to influence our youths?”

“We are like a battalion,” shouts Ronal’s mother. “The whole family has been in jail and we are not scared to go again.”

We met Don Alejandro’s family in El Palmar, where a four-lane highway will replace the main local road. He has been the region’s guitar manufacturer for decades, and his grandchildren are now taking on the trade. We learned more about the family’s rhythm of life, their farming techniques and the way they see life as campesinos. The family is considering resettling in neighboring Costa Rica in order to remain farmers, should the construction of the road lead to their eviction.

“We barely have the necessary tools and ressources to survive as farmers here," says Don Alejandro. "As you see, everything is done with the machete and we have no tractors and machines to help us. On the other hand, we get to live a quiet life. What will happen to our lifestyle should the road nearby become a highway for trucks?"

The eastern city of Nueva Guinea is located in the eastern side on the Caribbean coast, seven hours by bus from the capital. The canal will be forty kilometers away from their city, and people do not feel directly concerned. Rodriguez is a journalist at Radio Luz, the local Christian radio. He is eager to see the beginning for the construction of the canal. He and his colleagues are tired of their country’s stagnation and they do want to see things change, especially economically.  

“Since the end of the war in Nicaragua, the whole region has stagnated," he says. "People did move back from larger cities to the more isolated regions because it was safe again. But the government didn’t extend regional opportunities as promised. Maybe the canal will change all this."

It takes a three hours hazardous bus ride to reach Puerto Principe from Nueva Guinea. And another six hours on a lancha, a small motorised boat, to arrive at Pollo de Desarollo, a village close to the Caribbean. The village lies on the banks of the Punta Gorda river, that will eventually be enlarged to become the canal. Dina lives with her two sons and daughter in the village’s center, which consists of a baseball field and a few dozen houses. She holds the local “comedor,” a canteen that offers hot meals.

”We didn’t know yet that our village was endangered by the canals construction, this is why I welcomed the Chinese," she says. "They were very polite and paid really well. To be honest, if they come back tomorrow and pay the same amount again, I would still cook for them, despite the canal.”

She always talks with caution, as dozens of policemen currently stay in the village to “protect” a group of doctors carrying out medical surveys in the region. The main Nicaraguan opposition paper, Confidencial, claims that those doctors work hand in hand with the government to find out how much land families own along the canal’s route.

We met one of the doctors at Dina’s place. She tells us that many households refuse the medical visit. Asked about whether the government will have access to their survey, she refused to reply.

Dina also tells us about the visit Chinese engineers paid them some time ago. Around 20 Chinese stayed in her house for two months. They were carrying out ecological and scientific surveys to see whether the canal could pass through the Punta Gorda river. Back then, the Chinese were received quite well.

Aidak, Dina’s oldest son, explains that he doesn’t want to be a campesino in the future: with the canal, tourism will increase and he wishes to become a tourist guide. Dina hopes for good compensation. She is tired of living in an isolated village, and would love to start her life again elsewhere.

Travelling along the canal’s road has definitely raised an important question: Will the canal be built at all? Chamorro, of the Confidencial newspaper, believes that the whole project is a scam. The canal will never be built, but land will be seized at low prices from farmers who will barely benefit from business opportunities reserved for the Nicaraguan economic elite.

This Chinese mega project represents the 74th attempt to built a canal in Nicaragua. It may also be the 74th failure to do so.

Bangladesh: Shipyard Workers Face Har...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka face difficult work conditions. According to witnesses, many workers died in accidents related to explosions. The death toll from 2012 to 2014 at ship recycling yards stands at 44, leaving dozens of ship-breaking workers wounded.

Workers break down the rusty, old supertankers, cargo ships and cruisers that are no longer in use to reuse their steel and parts in new ships. There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.

Ashraful, a 17 year-old worker, has seen several of his colleagues fall victim to explosions, caused by ruptures in gas cylinders. “Our conditions are very bad. Most of us live by eating rice and vegetables. I cannot remember the last time I ate meat.”

About 15,000 people work in extremely dangerous conditions and earn between $4 and $5 as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common. Shipyard workers say make very meager earnings, without proper safety, and surrounded by the smell of asbestos.

Jamal Uddin, 32, has worked in the shipyard since 2012. He is a father of two and lives in his home-district Ranngpur. "I work in this place on a daily basis. There are no days off or holidays, so I can't go visit my family regularly. If I want, I can visit my house once a year for one week but without payment."

Most of the private shipyards use plate-steel, engines, components and machinery from old merchant ships, collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. However, frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise questions about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.

A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one. Other children, mostly climate refugees from flooded areas of the country, work there collecting scrap metal and used oil to sell in local markets.

Bangladesh is now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market, building vessels for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bengali shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Russia Faces Currency Woes (NSV)
Moscow
By Julia Lyubova
28 Nov 2014

NATURAL SOUND VERSION -- Suggested Script Below

Russia is facing bleak economic prospects as the country's national currency continues to fall. The ruble has already lost almost 30% of its value since June. It plunged some 14% against the US dollar in November alone. The ruble’s devaluation has had an adverse effect on many sectors of the economy.

Western sanctions over the Ukrainian crisis are playing a serious role in Russia's economic woes. The country's Finance Minister recently said that the economy is set to lose 40 billion US dollars per year from sanctions. These punitive measures block Russian companies from borrowing in the West, which could push the country towards a credit crunch.

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Russia Faces Currency Woes (VO)
Moscow
By Julia Lyubova
26 Nov 2014

Western sanctions on Russian businesses and individuals in response to Russia’s annexation of Crimea and alleged military involvement in Eastern Ukraine are beginning to take a toll on the ruble. The Russian government denies allegations by Western governments that it supports pro-Russian rebels in the Donbass region.

Multiple rounds of economic sanctions by the US, the EU and other Western countries starting in March 2014 progressively put travel bans in place on high-ranking officials, froze assets and banned transactions originating from certain individuals, and eventually targeted Russian energy firms and banks, with the goal of bringing about political change. Russia responded in kind, banning the import of agricultural goods from countries supporting the sanctions.

Today, Russia is facing bleak economic prospects as the country's national currency continues to fall. The ruble has already lost almost 30% of its value since June. It plunged some 14% against the US dollar in November alone. The ruble’s devaluation has had an adverse effect on many sectors of the economy.

“First of all it raised nearly twice the prices for agricultural goods, and for some industrial goods,” said Andrei Fedorov, an economist at The Russian Academy for Economics, Finance and Law. “ It's a very serious blow against tourism, tourism for Europe fell about 40% and only Turkey, Egypt and Thailand are still remaining on the tourists' list. One of the biggest blows is against automobile market... The ruble devaluation created a crisis in selling apartments, houses, dachas, et cetera.”

The Central Bank of Russia had been spending billions in a bid to prop up the ruble in recent months. But in early November it decided to cease its artificial support for the currency. The Bank of Russia says it will only intervene to prop up the ruble if there is a threat to financial stability.

“The Central Bank raised interest fees, interest rates, nearly twice since the beginning of the year,” Federov said. “And probably will do it once again in the beginning of next year...But all these things are not very much working also because there's certain panic inside the population. Since the beginning of the year, people have bought 45 billion dollars in cash. And of course all this money are not kept in the bank.”

The recent fall in global oil prices partly contributed to the weakness of the ruble. Russia's economy relies heavily on revenues from oil and gas exports. This makes the Russian ruble highly volatile to changes in oil prices and could lead to serious economic problems.

Aleksandr Zotin, the economic analyst and observer at 'Dengi' magazine likened the situation to the recessions that struck European economies after the sub-prime crisis in the US.

“According to the forecast of the Central Bank, if the price of oil declines to 60 dollars per barrel, the decline of the GDP could be around four percent, a rather big decline,” he said. “So it will be, I think, a serious recession, resembling the recession of 2009.”

Western sanctions over the Ukrainian crisis are playing a serious role in Russia's economic woes. The country's Finance Minister recently said that the economy is set to lose 40 billion US dollars per year from sanctions. These punitive measures block Russian companies from borrowing in the West, which could push the country towards a credit crunch.

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'Consumer Protection' in the Islamic ...
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
08 Nov 2014

November 9, 2014
Raqqa, 2014

The Islamic State "Control and Inspection Office" is one of the most active governing ministries in Raqqa. This footage shows members of the ministry searching for expired or spoiled products and products subject to poor storage in the stores and warehouses of Raqqa. The products are then confiscated and destroyed in public.

Other active Islamic State public offices in Raqqa include the Traffic Police Office and the Islamic Services Office.

Shot List:

-Ministry employee finishing his work in the office

-Ministry workers parading in the streets of Raqqa

-Ministry officers fining shop owners for having poor or expired products in their stores.

-One of the shop owners (interviewed) talks about the fining process: either they sign a commitment (pledge paper) or their shop will be sealed with red wax for several days.

-Products are taken to a public square in Raqqa, where Hisbah [Islamic State enforcers] men destroy a small amount of these products in front of the citizens, and the larger amount is taken to the dumpsite.

Speakers:

(00:08) Abu Al Bara’, worker at the Control and Inspection Office: The office was established in the city of Raqqa, and it is divided into two departments: the first is the most important department, the “Health Control Office”. Its main task is to monitor the markets and control the goods in the shops. This division fines shop owners and the case is referred to the court in order to take the right decision. The second division is the “Meat Department”. It is responsible for monitoring all kinds of meat in the State. This department punishes those who slaughter [their animals] outside a slaughterhouse (00:45).

(01:33) Abu Ahmad, a shop owner: Al hamdulillah [Thank god], the Islamic State established the Control and Inspection Office, and it has played a good role. He who defrauds is not one of us من غش فليس منا [Islamic Saying]. However sometimes, the shop owner unwittingly forgets some products on the shelves, and other times, other shoppers do it on purpose, but God punishes them. They usually warn the owners the first time, and then they destroy their products if they repeat.

(02:27) Abu Qahtan, one of the Hisbah men: Bismillah ir-Rahmanir-Rahim [In the name of God, the merciful, the compassionate], this is the Control and Inspection Office of the Islamic State. We seized large amounts of spoiled or expired products and products that were subject to poor storage. [This includes] food to beauty products. These products were seized in the shops of the Raqqa market, [and are valued at] approximately 2,000,000 SYP (11979.66 USD). We will destroy them now in front of everyone in this public square (03:12).

This footage was shot by a contributor who had clearance from the Islamic State to film in Raqqa. The footage was reviewed and approved by the Islamic State before being released.

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Racing buffaloes in Thailand
Chonburi
By Biel Calderon
06 Oct 2014

Chonburi, Thailand

Spectators eagerly await the race as enthusiastic emcees cheer over loudspeakers. Meanwhile, jockeys prepare their powerful water buffaloes to run the 100-meter soil track ahead.
Clouds of dust erupt as the large animals and their riders stampede towards the finishing line, while the crowd roars in support of their favorites. For the jockeys, controlling a water buffalo requires great skill and strength; getting thrown off the back of the buffalo could cause serious bodily harm.

Every year, hundreds of farmers travel with their large beasts from different parts of Thailand to Chonburi province, 90 kilometers away from the capital Bangkok, to take part in the traditional "Buffalo Racing Festival". This cultural event pays tribute to the hard working farm animals, which are greatly valued in this Southeast Asian country.

The contest, one of the best-known festivals in Thailand, has been celebrated for 140 years. Legend has it that Thai farmers from the countryside descended to Chonburi city to trade their agricultural products, and the event originated to settle an argument over who had the fastest buffalo in town.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
30 Jun 2014

June 29, 2014
Shiraz, Iran

Mannequins in traditional Islamic dress are seen lined up in a local mall.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
29 Jun 2014

June 29, 2014
Shiraz, Iran

Locals in an electronics shop which is selling high-end flat screen television sets.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
29 Jun 2014

June 29, 2014
Shiraz, Iran

Children play at Iran Land, an amusement park built inside the Persian Gulf Complex, a large shopping mall located in the outskirts of Shiraz.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
29 Jun 2014

June 29, 2014 S
Shiraz, Iran

A woman shops at Hyperstar, Irans first international-style hypermarket, built inside the Persian Gulf Complex, a huge mall in the outskirts of Shiraz. Hyperstar plans to open 15 branches by 2015 in 5 different cities.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
28 Jun 2014

June 28, 2014
Shiraz, Iran

Women are seen withdrawing money at a local ATM machine. Due to sanctions against Iran, international bank cards are not recognized.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
26 Jun 2014

June 26, 2014
Shiraz, Iran

Customers inside a dress shop.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
25 Jun 2014

June 25, 2014
Shiraz, Iran

A man plays an video game in the arcade section of a mall.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
23 Jun 2014

June 23, 2014
Shiraz, Iran

Cars are seen in a parking lot of Shiraz. Due to the international sanctions, importation of foreign cars is expensive and many Iranians opt to buy locally produced cars.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
22 Jun 2014

June 22, 2014
Yazd, Iran

Local women shop at the local Grand Bazaar. Despite the increasing number of malls that have opened around the country, many Iranians still prefer to shop in traditional bazaars.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
21 Jun 2014

June 21, 2014
Yazd, Iran

A young girl walks in the streets of Yazd. Iranian women are increasingly reluctant to comply with government-imposed traditional dress codes and many have started to go around the prohibitions, wearing western-style hijabs made of fashionable fabrics.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
19 Jun 2014

June 19, 2014
Isfahan, Iran

A portrait of Ayatollah Seyed Ali Khamenei and Ayatollah Ruhollah Musavi Khomeini is displayed on a wall of the Isfahan City Center Mall, one of the biggest in the country.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
19 Jun 2014

June 19, 2014
Isfahan, Iran

Customers at the "Kentucky House" one of the fast food restaurant built inside the Isfahan City Center Mall, one of the biggest in the country.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
19 Jun 2014

June 19, 2014
Isfahan, Iran

People shopping at the Isfahan City Center Mall, one of the biggest in the country.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
19 Jun 2014

June 19, 2014
Isfahan, Iran

Iranian youths walk in front of a recently opened unofficial Apple reseller.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
19 Jun 2014

June 19, 2014
Isfahan, Iran

A woman shops in an appliance center inside the Isfahan City Center Mall, one of the biggest in the country.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
18 Jun 2014

June 18, 2014
Isfahan, Iran

A young boy looks through a shop window.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
18 Jun 2014

June 18, 2014
Isfahan, Iran

Two girls check Facebook on a smartphone. Despite slow mobile internet connections, Iran has seen a considerable increase of consumers purchasing smartphones.

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Consumerism in Iran
Iran
By Ruom
18 Jun 2014

June 18, 2014
Isfahan, Iran

Traditional Islamic black chadors are sold at the local Bazaar. Iranian women are increasingly reluctant to comply with government-imposed traditional dress codes and many have started to go around the prohibitions, wearing western-style hijabs, made of fashionable fabrics.