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Spider Hunters (14 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

When caught the spiders are delicately put into small plastic bottles and kept there until they and ready to eat.

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Spider Hunters (3 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

The hunters look into the spiders lair and prepare for the capture.

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Spider Hunters (2 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

Wielding a axe a young hunter heads into the jungle in search of tarantula's.

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Spider Hunters (1 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

The children are calm while they dig for the eight-legged arachnids.

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Spider Hunters (7 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

A young hunter heads back to the jungle hut to give his catch to his mother to prepare for eating.

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Spider Hunters (21 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

The tarantulas are first drowned and washed in water before being tossed in salt and cooked in oil.

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Spider Hunters (20 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

The female tarantulas are prefered as generaly they are carrying eggs which adds to the flavour.

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Spider Hunters (22 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

The children prefer to eat the head first then strip the meat from the legs leaving the abdomen containing the precious eggs until last.

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Spider Hunters (5 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

The spiders are caught using a very primitive simple yet effective technique.

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Roti
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
By Dominic.J.Lucarelli
24 Jun 2012

Spinning roti dough in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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Spider Hunters in Cambodia
Trov Pheang Ctas
By George Nickels
09 Jun 2012

On The 9th August 2012 I was invited to the remote jungle village, known as Trov Pheang Ctas, located deep within the Svay Ler district in Cambodia. It was somewhere I had never been or heard of, and I assumed there might be both unexploded landmines, and illegal logging activities, as is the case in much of the rural countryside.
My time there would be spent documenting the hunt of one of Cambodia’s finest delicacies, Haplopelma albostriatum.
Haplopelma albostriatum, are a species of tarantula called "a-ping" in Khmer, and also known as the Thai zebra tarantula, when fully grown can reach the size of a human palm.
The spiders are caught using a very primitive simple yet effective technique, where the hunter will tease the creature from its den by the ways of using a stick to tickle its web and entice the spider to surface. The spider then makes its retreat deep into its hole, but no escaping as that’s when the improvised shovels come into play. Although venomous the tarantulas are not deadly and there bite has been described as something close to a very bad bee sting.
Once visable the arachnid is quickly plucked from its hole and grabbed by its back just in front of its abdomen using 2 fingers with care taken to avoid a nasty bite from there rather large fangs.
When caught the spiders are delicately put into small plastic bottles and kept there until they and ready to eat. The process used to prepare the catch for eating comprised of filling a bowl with water and jointly drowning and washing the spider in one easy step. The method used at this particular village was very cheap and easy, the spiders are tossed in salt and deep fried.
It is not clear how this practice started, but some have suggested that the population might have started eating spiders out of desperation during the years of Khmer Rouge rule, when food was in short supply.

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Butcher
Jakarta, Indonesia
By Dominic.J.Lucarelli
08 Jun 2012

A butcher at a morning market in Jakarta, Indonesia.

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Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
14 Apr 2012

Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Thousands of Syrians have been crossing into the Bekaa Valley situated along the border with Syria. We managed to reach some families in hiding in villages of Saad Neyil and Arsel.

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Egypt's Agriculture Ministry: 6,000 L...
Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
23 Mar 2012

Cairo, Egypt | March 22, 2012

Egypt's Ministry of Agriculture said in its daily report on Thursday, March 22, that the outbreak of foot and mouth disease (FMD) left at least 6,000 Livestock dead and 46,000 infected so far.
On the other hand, the FMD that spread throughout 25 governorates in Egypt threatens to prevail in North Africa and the Middle East causing a regional food security issue according to the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).
Investors and livestock farm owners, as well as veterinarians, believe that the government is to blame because of neither practicing strict preventive measures at the early stage of the FMD appearance nor providing a vaccine for the disease.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Kamel Girgis, investor at the European Countryside farming project in Egypt:
"FMD is spreading and we resort to preventive means. We do not be negligent in raising the animals. We perform something like quarantine and we raise the animal quality at the same time. We also add Sodium bicarbonates to the water to prevent infection, cleaning the floors well. However, the effective vaccine hasn’t been provided by the state yet."

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mustafa Fahmy, veterinarian specialized in animal medicine and surgery:
"There should have been preventive measures, preventing transpiration among governorates and shutting off marketplaces. That should’ve been done two months ago! The government make decisions now when it's too late, which is useless. On the other hand, where is the role of vet quarantine authorities?"

However, medical sources said the country has recently started to produce local vaccine to contain the issue.
Some Egyptians are reluctant to eat meat due to the FMD issue, resorting to chicken and fish as alternatives, while others think the FMD outbreak is a rumor and they continue buying meat, particularly that supervised by the army vet units.
SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Egyptian butcher:
"The customers were afraid that the meat might be infected of the disease. They feared to buy it. Praise be to Allah, they started to buy from us because they trust us. The meat is very good and there is nothing wrong with it."

SOUNDBITE 4 (Arabic) – Egyptian woman outside the butchery:
"The meat is good but they made us afraid because of the FMD issue. Afterwards, the prices of chicken and fish rose."

SOUNDBITE 5 (Arabic) – Egyptian man outside the butchery:
"For me, I have no problem because I know that 75% of the livestock were slaughtered before the FMD appeared. On the other hand, the meat supervised by the army is trustworthy because the army has a vet unit that tests the meat and any food and they care for the good of the people and the country. They cannot harm the citizens." Unexpectedly, poultry and fish sellers complain lower sales although they are the safe alternative for concerned Egyptians. This is because merchants raised their prices as a consequence of the FMD.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: March 22, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: March 22, 2012
Length: 0:03:18
Video Size: 163 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Various external shots of Egypt's Ministry of Agriculture in Cairo
2- Various shots of a livestock farm at the Cairo-Alexandria desert road
3- Various shots of livestock at the farm
4- Various shots of dead animals thrown in a vast area outside the farm
5- Long shot outside the farm
6- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Kamel Girgis, investor at the European Countryside farming project in Egypt:
"FMD is spreading and we resort to preventive means. We do not be negligent in raising the animals. We perform something like quarantine and we raise the animal quality at the same time. We also add Sodium bicarbonates to the water to prevent infection, cleaning the floors well. However, the effective vaccine hasn’t been provided by the state yet." 7- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mustafa Fahmy, veterinarian specialized in animal medicine and surgery:
"There should have been preventive measures, preventing transpiration among governorates and shutting off marketplaces. That should’ve been done two months ago! The government make decisions now when it's too late, which is useless. On the other hand, where is the role of vet quarantine authorities?"
8- Various shots of livestock at the farm
9- Pan right, a marketplace in Cairo
10- Various shots of a butchery
11- Various shots of animal meat displayed at the butchery
12- Various shots of a butcher chopping the meat
13- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Egyptian butcher:
"The customers were afraid that the meat might be infected of the disease. They feared to buy it. Praise be to Allah, they started to buy from us because they trust us. The meat is very good and there is nothing wrong with it." 14- SOUNDBITE 4 (Arabic) – Egyptian woman outside the butchery:
"The meat is good but they made us afraid because of the FMD issue. Afterwards, the prices of chicken and fish rose." 15- SOUNDBITE 5 (Arabic) – Egyptian man outside the butchery:
"For me, I have no problem because I know that 75% of the livestock were slaughtered before the FMD appeared. On the other hand, the meat supervised by the army is trustworthy because the army has a vet unit that tests the meat and any food and they care for the good of the people and the country. They cannot harm the citizens." 16- Various shots of the marketplace
17- Various shots of chicken displayed for sale at the marketplace
18- Various shots of women buying chicken
19- Medium shot of the marketplace

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Life in Malawi 15
Zingwangwa, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
24 Dec 2011

In a dark corner of the indoor market, the rice trader attracts customers by playing local music on his stereo.
Zingwangwa is a low to middle income township of Blantyre, the biggest commercial city of Malawi.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
20 Dec 2011

December 20, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

Julio is ready to go back home with his daily catch. Due to the sea tides, sometimes thepercebeirosneed to harvest under artificial light.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
20 Dec 2011

December 20, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

Julio checks his daily catch. Due to the sea tides, sometimes thepercebeirosneed to harvest under artificial light.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
20 Dec 2011

December 12, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

A percebeiro gets hit by an unexpected wave.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
20 Dec 2011

December 20, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

A percebeiro inspects a rock to find percebes.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
20 Dec 2011

December 20, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

A group of percebeiros gets hit by an unexpected wave. Even when the weather is good, the sea is extremely dangerous on this part of the coast.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
19 Dec 2011

December 1, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

A percebeiro cleans a perfect sample of percebe.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
19 Dec 2011

December 1, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

Percebes grow in the gaps between rocks and sometimes the only way to harvest them is by hand.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
19 Dec 2011

December 19, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

Percebeiros try to harvest together so that they are not alone if an accident happens. Even when the weather is good, the sea is extremely dangerous on this part of the coast.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
19 Dec 2011

December 19, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

Julio cleans a perfect sample of a percebe.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
19 Dec 2011

December 19, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

A group of percebeiros run away from an unexpectedly large wave.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
19 Dec 2011

December 19, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

A group of percebeiros talk just before they start the harvest. After a week of rain and huge waves, the sun is shining and the percebeiros are in a very good mood.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
19 Dec 2011

December 19, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

A percebeiro prepares himself for the days harvest in his warehouse.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
18 Dec 2011

December 18, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

A view of the lighthouse in Laxe.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
17 Dec 2011

December 17, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

Julio reads an article in the local newspaper about the percebeiros having to deal with the bad conditions of the sea over the previous few days. The title says "Risking life for 2 kg of percebes".

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
17 Dec 2011

December 17, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

Percebeiros talk outside the bar in the port.

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Galicia's Goose Barnacle Hunters
Laxe
By Ruom
17 Dec 2011

December 17, 2011
Laxe (La Corua) Spain

It's Sunday and percebeiros play dominos at the local bar.