Thumb sm
Food deserts (3 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (4 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (5 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (6 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (7 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (10 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (13 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (14 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (15 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (16 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (17 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (1 of 29)
Harlem, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (2 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (8 of 29)
Harlem, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (11 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (12 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Food deserts (9 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (16 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
03 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Camel socuk is a sausage made from a mixture of camel and beef and is served as a novelty during camel wrestling tournaments. Camels that are not able to wrestle often end up slaughtered for their meat.

Thumb sm
Escaping Hong Kong (7 of 8)
Hong Kong, China
By Joan Planas
09 Jan 2013

Josh, age 45, is having breakfast in Hong Kong (January 2012). He always frequents the same restaurant that is very close to his home in Sham Po.

Thumb sm
Cooking
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
17 Dec 2012

A displaced woman from Timbuktu cooks food in the room of her host family in Bamako to later sell at the market. Many displaced find it hard to make ends meet as they are not able to resume their normal activities and livelihoods they had in the north.

Thumb sm
Vegetables
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
15 Dec 2012

Many displaced women sell vegetables in order to feed their families in Bamako. More than 265,000 displaced travelled to refugee camps in Mauritania, Niger and Burkina Faso while 185,800 more have been internally displaced.

Thumb sm
Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (3...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

Tomato and potato soup being cooked at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. The same doctor reported high incidence of diarrhea, lung infections and hepatitis A among the population of nearly 3600 displaced Syrians.

Thumb sm
Azaz Camp, Syria (8 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

Thumb sm
Azaz Camp, Syria (9 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

Thumb sm
Azaz Camp, Syria (12 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

Thumb sm
Azaz Camp, Syria (13 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

Thumb sm
Azaz Camp, Syria (14 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

Thumb sm
Azaz Camp, Syria (34 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

Thumb sm
Azaz Camp, Syria (40 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

Thumb sm
Fruit Stand
Aleppo, Syria
By pathilsman
30 Nov 2012

The demonstration passes one of the few remaining fruit stands in Aleppo

Thumb sm
"I WANT TO EAT AND I WANT DEMOCRACY" ...
Amman, Jordan
By Editor's Picks
14 Nov 2012

A crowd of about 2,000 gathered in front of Amman's Interior Ministry Circle in response to rising fuel prices in Jordan. Also calling publicly for the fall of the regime, protesters burned tires, vandalized photos of the king and blocked roads. One protester, when asked why he was protesting said, "I want to eat and I want democracy."

Thumb sm
New York Blackout Continues (2 of 10)
New York, USA
By Derek Henry Flood
01 Nov 2012

A beige National Guard vehicle pulls away from a makeshift food distribution center on the corner of Houston and Pitt Streets on the Lower East Side. Guardsmen were being tasked with distributing meals en masse is disaster-affected areas of the city.

Thumb sm
Samir's Alley in Zaatari
Mafraq, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
31 Oct 2012

Samir and his family live in the newest section of the Zaatari Refugee camp the area where he lives is surrounded by his family including his brothers and their families and his mother who also made the trek with Samir and his eight children across the border under the cover of night with the Free Syrian Army in August. This small alley way is where his family lives in seven different tents. Here Samir fixes the winterization kits given by UNHCR, next to him lies bread from the bread line that arrived one day ago that has become moldy.

Frame 0004
Skyrocketing Food Prices Ahead Of Mus...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
25 Oct 2012

Skyrocketing prices hit Egyptians ahead of the big Muslim holiday, the Feast of Sacrifice (Eid Al-Adha), particularly the prices of meat, vegetables and fruits, which Egyptians buy in exceptionally large quantities on this occasion.

Muslims in Egypt and worldwide buy sacrificial animals, whether a cow, ram, goat, etc, to slaughter on the first day of the Feast, known by Muslims as Eid, but those who cannot afford it just buy meat to cook and share with family members.

The kilogram of meat used to vary from 35 to 40 Egyptian pounds, but on these days it has exceeded 70 pounds, which is not affordable by a lot of Egyptians, 40% of which live under poverty line. [1 USD = 6.1 EGP]

Egyptian butchers complain that the difficult financial conditions of the people reflected in their selling.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ali Abdel-Tawwab, butcher, store owner:
“Selling is very weak and things are very quiet. The difficult financial conditions affect everything, the people and the market.”

Rising prices didn’t stop at meat, but the prices of vegetables and fruits also recorded notable increase.

Some vegetable and fruit sellers say that the Eid eve used to be a prime selling season before the revolution, and that this year the selling on this day is just like other days.

Egyptian customers now reduce the quantities of food they used to buy for such an occasion, whether it is meat, fruits or vegetables.

Some see that food prices are incredibly higher this year while others see that they are reasonable.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Fatima, woman, customer at the marketplace:
“Whether it is on Eid days or ordinary days, Food prices have become very expensive. It’s rather too expensive.”

A few hours before the big Muslim holiday kicks off, Egyptians, 90% of whom are Muslims, hope that the new president and his government fulfill their promises regarding improving people’s standard of living and financial conditions, boosting economy and reducing poverty.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 25, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 25, 2012
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot, a bridge and traffic in Cairo
2. Various shots at a butcher’s, butchers chopping and slicing meat, a customer waiting
3. Various shots of cows at a stockyard
4. Pan right, a man dragging a cow
5. Various shots of sheep at a stockyard in the street
6. Various shots of customers at a butcher’s
7. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ali Abdel-Tawwab, butcher, store owner:
“Selling is very weak and things are very quiet. The difficult financial conditions affect everything, the people and the market.” 8. Various shots of a marketplace of vegetables and fruits
9. Various shots of fruits displayed for sale on stands in the marketplace, including peaches, pineapples, mangoes, etc
10. Various shots of a fruit seller
11. Various shots of tomatoes, cucumbers, potatoes and other vegetables displayed for sale in the marketplace
12. Various shots of the vegetable seller
13. Long shot, people walking around at the marketplace
14. Various shots of a marketplace of vegetables and fruits displayed for sale
15. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Fatima, woman, customer at the marketplace:
“Whether it is on Eid days or ordinary days, Food prices have become very expensive. It’s rather too expensive.” 16. Pan right, an old man buying something at the marketplace
17. Long shot, people walking around at the marketplace

Frame 0004
FARM TO FORK trailer
Nepal
By PIKTO VIDEO
03 Oct 2012

It is strange to observe that despite the sacred statute of food in Nepal, it is paradoxically the origin of many diseases sometimes leading to death. We know that millions of people don’t have enough to eat, and that some of them even face severe conditions of malnutrition. Of all facts, food security remains a major problem in Nepal. But what we know less is that 50% of the diseases come from a misuse of food and water. This alarming figure is more than ever a topical issue. In order to find answers and solutions, we investigated the backstage of food, from where it is produced – the farm – to our final consumption – the fork!
This trailer is about a documentary of 38mn (nepali version with english subtitles) in HD 1080i. Possible to get an international version.

Thumb sm
Family
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
16 Sep 2012

Families from Gao and Kidal prepare food together in the compound they share together in Bamako. Many displaced say they are in need of adequate shelter, food and clean water.

Thumb sm
Spider Hunters (9 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

A boy observes and learns the techniques needed to catch the Khmer Delicacy.

Thumb sm
Spider Hunters (12 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

Once visable the arachnid is quickly plucked from its hole and grabbed by its back just in front of its abdomen using 2 fingers with care taken to avoid a nasty bite from there rather large fangs.

Thumb sm
Spider Hunters (11 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

From a very young age children a taught the techniques needed to survive when food is in short supply.