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Migrant Workers of Lebanon 10
Beirut, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
31 Dec 2013

Rahel Zegeye has overcome many challenges in Lebanon in order to be where she is at today: a documentary filmmaker, a leading activist, a playwright and a source of help for her fellow migrant workers who have been mistreated. She is at work on her second film, which she has recently received funding for.

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Migrant Workers of Lebanon 12
Beirut, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
31 Dec 2013

Though Mimi is grateful for her good situation in Lebanon, and all that she has learned, she will be leaving soon in order to go home and start a family. She and Masaret are friends, and both of them work together to help fellow workers who have been mistreated or are in a bad situation.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
21 Dec 2013

Ahmad lights the room with a candle for Dr. Batley to examine his mothers frostbite feet, Ahmad lives in an area outside of Arsal past the last Lebanese military check point and the borders of Syria. He is from Al Qusair and fled with his family when heavy clashes broke out between Syrian regime forces and opposition group.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
21 Dec 2013

A small group of Lebanese citizens in Beirut organized a Facebook page to bring awareness to the refugee issues in Lebanon, Lebanese for Syrians. The page became an avenue for Lebanese to donate and volunteer to help with the desperate displaced people in their country. In only a week, the page allowed the civil campaign to raised over $40,000 in donations and implement their first medical aid mission with a volunteer medical team in both the town of Arsal and beyond the Lebanese military borders into “no-mans-land” where displaced Syrians are living in makeshift shelters.

The organizer, Carol Maalouf, was overwhelmed to witness the amount of Lebanese willing to help Syrian refugees. This help is necessary, as the refugees in Arsal are preparing for what is being predicted by many to be one of Lebanon’s worst winters in decades. Thousands of these displaced people live in terrible conditions in a barely habitable area that separates Lebanon from Syria, and is subject to aircraft missile strikes, mortar fire and sporadic border clashes from the Syrian conflict, being fought less then a mile away.

The majority of the refugees in Arsal and surrounding areas are from Qusair and Qulamoun. Both of these towns are major conflict areas with constant clashes between the Syrian Army and the Opposition. The situation for these people is dire and they are in need of medical aid, shelters, food and clothing. The area is mostly populated with women and children without any medical aid or supplies from NGOs that do not enter the region, but rather stop at the last check point of the Lebanese Army. The Lebanese for Syrians initiative is quickly growing in influence with the help of social media and will continue to help and bring awareness to the Lebanese people through their fellow citizens.

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Russia Delivers Aid to Syrian Refugee...
Rafic Hariri International Airport, Beirut, Lebanon
By Ali Majed
18 Dec 2013

Russia sent Wednesday a new batch of humanitarian aid for 846,000 Syrian refugees in Lebanon.

وصلت اليوم الأربعاء الى العاصمة اللبنانية بيروت طائرة روسية، هي الخامسة من نوعها، تحمل حوالي 40 طنا من المساعدات للاجئين السوريين في لبنان والذين تخطى عدد المسجلين منهم 846 ألفا وأرسلت روسيا في وقت سابق من هذا العام 4 طائرات مساعدات للاجئين السوريين في لبنان. ويبلغ عددد اللاجئين السوريين المسجلين لدى مفوضية الأمم المتحدة في بيروت 846 ألفا، فيما تؤكد السلطات اللبنانية أن عددهم الاجمالي تخطى المليون و200 الف. وفي العاشر من الشهر الجاري، أرسلت روسيا طائرتين إلى مدينة اللاذقية السورية وعلى متنهما 44 طناً من المساعدات الإنسانية بينها بعض الأثاث والخيم وأسرّة وبطانيات وأواني ومعلبات وأدوية

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Abu Shakir 3
Damascus, Syria
By lukas.goga
11 Dec 2013

Adnan al-Omari with his son Abu Hamzeh in front of their juice bar. Abu Hamzeh studied journalism, but works in family business which, according to his father, goes well despite an ongoing economic crisis in Syria.

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Abu Shakir 2
Damascus, Syria
By lukas.goga
11 Dec 2013

Abu Shakir is the most famous juice bar in Damascus. It is a small place in a narrow street where customers usually sit outside on plastic chairs. There is an ongoing civil conflict and economic crisis in Syria, but still the bar has not lost its loyal customers.

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Abu Shakir 4
Damascus, Syria
By lukas.goga
11 Dec 2013

Adnan al-Omari, started working in family business in 1953 and improved it. He is nearly 70 years old and supervises his two sons who now run it. He still buys fresh fruits every day.

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Abu Shakir 1
Damascus, Syria
By lukas.goga
11 Dec 2013

Muhammad, older son of Adnan al-Omari, is posing with banana milk shake with cream qishteh. He works every day and takes order from Abu Shakir´s customers. He is always smiling.

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Damascus' Most Famous Juice Bar
Damascus, Syria
By lukas.goga
11 Dec 2013

This is a collection including an article, video reportage and five pictures about the most famous juice bar in Damascus.

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Destruction of homs 18
Homs
By yazan1985
08 Dec 2013

Destruction of the Hamidiya neighborhood in Homs as a result of shelling from the Syrian regime. Seen here- Ghasaniya Secondary School and "Rooh Quds" Cathedral. Homs, Syria

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After the Spring: Libya Beyond the He...
Libya
By Transterra Editor
06 Dec 2013

As news of violent militias, unchecked powers, rebel uprisings and high profile kidnappings fill the pages, turmoil and discontent fill many minds. Though, it is easy to get caught up in the loudest elements of regime change. We often forget that Libya, is home to many people, many of whom are trying to rebuild and grow after years of hardship.

As this fledgling democracy finds its feet, Libyans enjoy the freedom of daily life. Despite all the hardship Libyans struggle with due to the conflict, there is room for new opportunities because of the war. Booming after the controlling government of the Gadhafi era, many of the spheres he regulated are now wide open. News outlets in Libya expanded from a handful of censored papers to hundreds of newspapers, radio shows, and cable channels. Many presume that the countries new constitution will hold greater rights for women and minorities. Intrepid women have taken to running for elected office and opening small businesses. Libyans feel liberated and can indulge in pastimes banned under the strict Gaddafi regime such as boxing and several media outlets have launched on account of the new freedom of press. Much has changed for the better, shelled stores have been rebuilt and are back in business and the fragile government grows more cohesive every day.

After a year of civil war, life has begun to move beyond the revolution. Babies are birthed every day into the new fledgling country, marriages officiated and soldiers repatriated. While the violence in Libya has diminished allowing room for regrowth, sporadic flares of conflict take the main stage while a critical part of the story of the revolution is ignored. Libya, now more than ever, isn’t simply violent rebels in a dusty desert depicted in western media.

Students have returned to class working through the summer to make up time lost and progress with their degrees. Student government, which was also banned under the previous government is now a popular club as Libyans; who haven’t voted in 42 years exercise their rights regularly. Often voting on even the smallest things.

Though some things will never change in this desert country. The beach is still a popular destination, with families filing the sand every evening. Amusement parks are now open, after crews were quickly dispatched to fix the damage and cover the bullet holes.

The Libyan people are experiencing a whole range of emotions that go beyond violence and suffering. Libya’s rehabilitation efforts as a country move slowly though they are much more powerful and important than the dissonance among few and with that, healing can begin.

Rebirth has come to the country, and with that the brave can find forgiveness among neighbors and a country can find peace.

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Migrant Workers of Lebanon 6
Beirut, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
03 Dec 2013

Masaret shows a wallet size photo of her family that she supports financially, but never sees. In the decade she has been in Lebanon, she has only returned to Ethiopia on three occasions.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 9
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

A young girl is working at her father's food kiosk on the street of Hawa ("Eve" in Arabic) mosque while he went home for lunch. The kiosk sells tomato paste, margarine and jam. Before the war it was a good middle and upper class neighborhood. Today, most people living in the area are on the border of poverty and have to face daily bombardments.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 2
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

Two sisters (right) and their cousins (left) are playing French skipping near their home. The house behind them was hit by mortars several times. Its inhabitants have abandoned it after the bombardments. Despite the danger the constant bombing threats, the girls continue to go out and meet in the streets to play.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 6
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

A young boy coming back from school stares at his neighbors' garden, which was bombed only one hour before. The garden is facing a park where children from the neighborhood often play.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 4
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

10 year-old Mohammed dropped out from school to work and help his parents and three younger siblings. Everyday, the young boy roams the streets of Duma collecting, wooden doors and furniture from shelled houses as well as material like nylon for his mom to cook. Mohammed also collects metal or anything that seems valuable and sells it for extra money. His father has been working as a porter since he lost his job at a bakery five months ago. All bakeries in Eastern Ghoutta have shut down because of the siege. Mohammad says he is proud of what he does and does not feel humiliated from working in the rubble.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 12
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

A young boy poses on his bike on the Al Kabeer mosque square, now referred to as the Al Hurriya (freedom) square, which has witnessed numerous protests since the war began in 2011. Children in Ghouta seem to have lost their sense of fear. They continue to play in the streets despite the constant threat of bombardments, shelling and clashes between armed groups and the Syrian army.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 1
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

Three neighbors walk in front of a five stories building that was destroyed by a Mig rocket on their way home after school. In Ghouta, basements are now safer than the surface. Classes are now happening in underground bunker schools.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 10
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

A young girl is working at her father's food kiosk on the street of Hawa ("Eve" in Arabic) mosque while he went home for lunch. The kiosk sells tomato paste, margarine and jam. Before the war it was a good middle and upper class neighborhood. Today, most people living in the area are on the border of poverty and have to face daily bombardments.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 3
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

10 year-old Mohammed dropped out from school to work and help his parents and three younger siblings. Everyday, the young boy roams the streets of Duma collecting, wooden doors and furniture from shelled houses as well as material like nylon for his mom to cook. Mohammed also collects metal or anything that seems valuable and sells it for extra money. His father has been working as a porter since he lost his job at a bakery five months ago. All bakeries in Eastern Ghoutta have shut down because of the siege. Mohammad says he is proud of what he does and does not feel humiliated from working in the rubble.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 8
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

A father climbs over a three meters high pile of rubble with his four year-old daughter to reach his house. When asked what he was doing, the father said he had just taken his daughter for a walk around the block to get some fresh air.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 5
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

Three children are playing in a building that used to host restaurants. The building was destroyed by rocket shelling and has now become a dumpster.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 11
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

Three children are walking in an empty street in the Hijjareya neighborhood of Ghouta. This rebel held area is located next to Al Wafedeen camp that is held by the Syrian regime and has been the target of heavy clashes between both parties. When asked what they are doing in the street, the children simply said their mother has sent them out to buy groceries.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 7
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

The kids are playing around over demolished houses. More than 50 houses were completely demolished by a bombardment of 4 rockets.

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Migrant Workers in Lebanon
Beirut, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
29 Nov 2013

A man sells uniforms for domestic workers in Hamra, an area of Beirut, for less than $15. There are over 200,000 migrant workers in Lebanon, many of whom are women working in Lebanese households. One of the main issues with the rights of migrant workers in Lebanon is that their status is tied to their sponsor under the "kefala system." Migrant domestic workers are severely limited within Lebanon - they cannot travel, switch employment, leave or enter the country without the permission of their sponsor - particularly because their documents are almost always confiscated and held by their sponsor. This leaves many vulnerable, as they have to rely on their sponsors to take care of their welfare.

Photos by Omar Alkalouti
Text by Melissa Tabeek

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Migrant Workers in Lebanon
Beirut, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
29 Nov 2013

Jessy, 49, from Cebu, Philippines, stands outside her salon, "Jessy Nails," with her daughter, Nour in Hamra, an area of Lebanon's capital, Beirut. Though she is from the Philippines, she feels that Lebanon is her homeland. She was first a migrant worker in Kuwait in 1999, where she worked as a clerical typist. She came to Lebanon after nine years with her Lebanese husband, whom she met there, and the first of her two children. After working in various salons for 5-6 years in Lebanon, she was able to fulfill her dream of opening up her own place. Since she left Cebu in 1999, she has dreamed of opening up her own salon.

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Syrian Conflict Footage: Editor's Picks
Syria
By Transterra Editor
29 Nov 2013

Conflict footage from both sides of the Syrian conflict, on the ground from contributors all over the country. This collection consists of produced, rough cut, and raw, footage.

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Migrant Workers in Lebanon
Beirut, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
29 Nov 2013

Rahel Zegeye, 34, is an Ethiopian domestic worker from Faransy by day, and a documentary filmmaker and artist by night. Her first feature film, "Beirut," focused on the plight of domestic workers in Lebanon and took her two years to film in the country. She has recently received funding for a second film, which will also focus on domestic workers. Rahel has been in Lebanon for 13 years, and in that time has become a local leader in the fight for migrant workers' rights.

Photo by Omar Alkalouti
Text by Melissa Tabeek

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Migrant Workers in Lebanon
Beirut, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
28 Nov 2013

A domestic worker on the balcony of her employer's home. There are over 200,000 migrant workers in Lebanon, many of whom are women working in Lebanese households. One of the main issues with the rights of migrant workers in Lebanon is that their status is tied to their sponsor under the "kefala system." Migrant domestic workers are severely limited within Lebanon - they cannot travel, switch employment, leave or enter the country without the permission of their sponsor - particularly because their documents are almost always confiscated and held by their sponsor. This leaves many vulnerable, as they have to rely on their sponsors to take care of their welfare.

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Migrant Workers in Lebanon
Beirut, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
28 Nov 2013

Maimouna, 24, from Cameroon, stands in front of a shop display of domestic worker uniforms in Gemmayze, Beirut, with a friend from Cameroon, also a domestic worker. Her friend had just lost her mother, but was unable to travel because she could not obtain the right documents to travel out of the country. Maimouna was kicked out of her employer's house for refusing to clean multiple family member's houses for the same pay. Her personality is infectious and strong, and she refuses to let people treat her badly. "You do me, I'll do you back," she says with a giggle.

Photo by Omar Alkalouti
Text by Melissa Tabeek

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Migrant Workers in Lebanon
Beirut, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
27 Nov 2013

Maimouna, 24, is from Cameroon, and has been in Lebanon since October 2010. She had been with her "Madame," for over a year, when she suddenly threw her out because she did not want clean multiple family members' houses for the same pay. Maimouna was forced to leave immediately, and is now staying with a friend from her home country, looking for work. "I cannot tell others to come here," she says, "It's too difficult. The people here treat you like nothing, like animal."

Photo by Omar Alkalouti
Text by Melissa Tabeek

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Migrant Workers in Lebanon
Beirut, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
27 Nov 2013

Maimouna, 24, is from Cameroon, and has been in Lebanon since October 2010. She had been with her "Madame," for over a year, when she suddenly threw her out because she did not want clean multiple family members' houses for the same pay. Maimouna was forced to leave immediately, and is now staying with a friend from her home country, looking for work. "It's open in this country, but the mentality is bad. It's so difficult," she says. She plans to stay in Lebanon - she came here to work and make money, and that is what she plans to continue to do, at all costs.

Photo by Omar Alkalouti
Text by Melissa Tabeek

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Syrian children play in destroyed sch...
Aleppo
By Jean Carrere
27 Nov 2013

Syrian children play in the ravaged playground of what used to be their school. The school was targeted by airstrikes several times since the war broke in Aleppo, and was hit by an airstrike yet again on 29/11. The school stands only a few blocks away from the Dar al-Shifaa hospital, which was fully destroyed by another airstrike on 22/11.

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Syrian Limb Center 6
Reyhanli, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
26 Nov 2013

Raed al-Masri, the limb center's founder, gives advice to an amputee as he uses his new leg for the first time. Al-Masri used to be a math teacher in Syria until he fled to Turkey and now runs the clinic full-time.