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"Save" Yarmouk Refugee Camp 12
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
08 Apr 2015

An activist holds a sign during a demonstration to "save" Yarmouk refugee camp in Damscus, Syria.

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"Save" Yarmouk Refugee Camp 13
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
08 Apr 2015

Activists stand in line near to the Checkpoint Charlie in Berlin during a demonstration to call for a humanitarian support in the Yarmouk refugee camp in Damascus, Syria.

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"Save" Yarmouk Refugee Camp 14
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
08 Apr 2015

An activist writes a sentence on a sign during the demonstration to "save" Yarmouk refugee camp.

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Portrait of a Generation: WWII Vetera...
New York City, NY
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
07 Apr 2015

The Second World War was fought by an entire generation of men from more than 60 nations. Americans, Canadians, Russian, British, Chinese, South Africans and many others fought the Japanese, Spaniards, Italians, Germans, Slovaks and more, all were embroiled in a war which killed over 50 millions soldiers and civilians alike, making this conflict the bloodiest in Human history. The 1921/22-generation is today often known as a sacrificed generation, which fought for a various array of beliefs all intertwined in self-sacrifice and honor. In Germany alone 5.2 million soldiers were killed or missing in battle in a six-year period, Japan lost over 2 million men in combat, while the United States suffered 409 thousand men killed in action. However Russia holds the morbid record, with more than 10 million killed between 1941 and 1945. These astounding numbers show the brutality in which this war was fought in the air, on land and in the seas.

As a journalist, always in search for a certain historical truth within today’s framework, the stories of each of these men interviewed and photographed is a treasure of human perseverance. The project contains no pretense to judge or criticize the actions or decisions taken by these men, but it is rather a recollection of a period drastically different from ours. Their testimony is relevant in a historical sense, which should not be lost in time, as the next generations to come can and should learn from this generation.

The project itself differs from other veteran type shoots, in the sense that it tries to combine so many different nationalities. This combination was hard to achieve. It took no less than 5 years and travels to over 12 countries to meet, photograph, and interview these men. As a photojournalist, it was not only the photo shoot that was interesting, but also the search to meet these veterans, especially the ex Waffen SS and the foreign elements who fought within its ranks; and the more obscure nationalities who fought alongside major powers, like Croatians or Senegalese.

The photography project deals with as many nationalities as possible, for the simple reason that many nations were involved in the fighting. So far I have photographed Germans, Russians, Armenians, Karabastis, French, Belgium, Poles, Americans, Nepalese, Croatian, Czechs, Latvians, Japanese Americans, Pilipino, Hungarians and more…, which includes 221 men from 59 different nationalities.  Each man is interviewed on his experience through out the war. The goal of this project is to reunite as many veterans as possible from most of the nations involved in the Second World War.

FULL ARTICLE AND INTERVIEWS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Brain Drain: Syria's Skilled Youth St...
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

2015

Berlin, Germany

Syria’s brightest minds have been forced to leave the war-torn country for Europe to try to make a new a life for themselves. Doctors, engineers, and artists are among those who flee to Germany. In January and Febraury alone, the EU member state received 10,175 asylum requests from Syrians, according to the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees. However, in Germany these young talented people have to deal with long bureaucratic processes, marginalization and the hurdles of learning a difficult language.

These photos profile young, skilled Syrians who are trying to create new lives for themselves in Berlin. 

ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Brain Drain 2
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Naabeel, 30, from Aleppo, computer engineer, graduated after a five-years course at the Mamoun Private University for Science and Technology in Aleppo and worked in Egypt in a textile company. He sits on the bench waiting for his turn to register as refugee in Berlin.

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Brain Drain 3
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Moustaf and Nabeel in the emergency facility for refugees in Krupp Street, Moabit, Berlin's north western suburb. They met for the first time in Berlin and now they share the same room in the facility.

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Brain Drain 4
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Moustaf entertains a Syrian child on the football pitch, which was converted into an emergency facility tent.

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Brain Drain 5
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Nabeel helps another refugee from Syria translate a message from the Berlin immigration authorities relating to a doctor's appointment for his wife, who suffers from a kidney disfunction. Nabeel volunteers in the refugee camp to help members of the Syrian community.

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Brain Drain 6
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Nabeel enjoys Mateh tea with other members of the Syrian community, which comprise the majority in the refugee facility.

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Brain Drain 7
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Moustaf inside the refugee camp refreshes himself with a glass of water. There are no activities to carry on doing during the day in the refugee facility.

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Brain Drain 8
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Omar,25, from Aleppo, had his own music studio where he self-produced Arabic hip hop music.
He earned a baccalaureate in English-Arabic translation and, before opening the studio, he worked for a small advertisement company with two other graphic designers. German authorities have granted him a two year residency permit that allows him to work or rent an apartment.

"I haven’t looked for a job", he said. "For me the priority is to study German or to find a scholarship at university. I am learning German here and it is my third week."

Omar is the courtyard of the refugee facility in Marienfelde, Berlin. During the Cold War, this facility was used to accommodate refugees coming from East Germany.
"Here for six months I have been doing nothing," he said. "Come on, it is Germany, if I finish to sort out my documents within six months that means that I am very lucky. There is lot of bureaucracy."

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Brain Drain 9
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Omar rolls a cigarette in the courtyard of the refugee camp.

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Brain Drain 10
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Omar talks with a young Syrian in the refugee camp.

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Brain Drain 12
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Omar with the wife Louise, 24, from France, in the kitchen of their small apartment inside the refugee camp. "I feel my priority now it is to find flat for me and my wife," he said. "It is really hard: either you find something at the end of the world in Berlin and you need one and half hour to reach the city, or there is no chance. Who is paying for our rent is not us, [it] is the job center, so would you prefer a person with a job or someone the jobcenter is paying for and you don’t know then when the job center stops providing support? We have really strict and hard conditions we have to go through."

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Brain Drain 11
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan, 32, dentist from Hama, studied three years at the university of Baghdad and three years at the college of dentistry in Damascus. She worked in Damascus in a state health centre for two years. She wants to work as a dentist in Berlin, but before doing so she needs to equalize her degree to the German education standard.

Razan is with other Syrian refugees and schoolmates waiting to start a German lesson. She attends a course to learn the German language four days a week from 2pm to 5pm.

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Brain Drain 14
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan sits on the stairs at the school entrance in Kreuzberg, Berlin's southern suburb, reading the grammar book that she uses to learn the German language.

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Brain Drain 15
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan talks with a schoolmate in the classroom while the German lesson is about to start. The classmates are also refugees.

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Brain Drain 17
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

After attending German class, Razan meets a friend near the school in Kreuzberg. She talks with animosity about the demonstration organized in Berlin to remember the fourth anniversary of the uprising in Syria.

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Brain Drain 16
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan awaits for the bus to go home near Goerlitzer Park.

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Brain Drain 20
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan returns to home. She sits on the sofa in the kitchen and speaks with the mother via Skype. Her family lives in Cairo, Egypt and she has applied for an Egyptian visa to be able to visit them.

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Brain Drain 19
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan cries while talking to her mother via Skype. She has been away from her family for the past year.

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Brain Drain 18
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan recovers from the tears while speaking with the mother in Egypt.

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Brain Drain 13
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
25 Mar 2015

Razan talks on the phone with a Syrian friend in the presence of her flatmate.

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Brain Drain 1
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
18 Mar 2015

Moustaf Aljundi, 26, from Homs . Educated in England, Cambridge, a degree in human resources management and professional basketball player, Moustaf returned to Syria to work for a company in the human resources department and played with the Syrian national basket team. He sits on a bench waiting for his turn to register as a refugee in front of LAGeSo (Landesamt fuer Gesundheit und Soziale) the operative arm of the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs of the State of Berlin.

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GI Ghost Town 01
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

An Autobahn sign off of the A62 shows exits for Baumholder and other small villages in Rheinland-Pfalz.
Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
10 March 2015

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GI Ghost Town 02
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

A hillside covered in white and brown housing units and barracks for US Military personnel and their families while stationed in Baumholder, Germany.
10 March 2015

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GI Ghost Town 03
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

Local businesses and road signs pointing toward local villages and training areas on a main thoroughfare in Baumholder, coming from the A62.
Baumholder, Germany
10 March 2015 

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GI Ghost Town 04
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

Khalil Kanji Kamis, a refugee from Syrian Kurdistan makes a Döner Kebab Sandwich at a local restaurant he owns, which relies heavily on American patrons.  “95% of my customers are Americans.”
Baumholder, Germany 

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GI Ghost Town 05
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

Decorations in the Afrin Döner Kebab shop owned by Khalil Kanji Kamis, a refugee from Syrian Kurdistan, which relies heavily on American patrons.  “95% of my customers are Americans.”
Baumholder, Germany 
10 March 2015

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GI Ghost Town 06
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

A memorial on the grounds of Smith Barracks, which in the height of the war in Iraq housed the 2nd Brigade of the 1st Armored Division, which deployed for a total of 4 years of the 8 year war.  In those 4 years at war, Baumholder lost 63 soldiers in the line of duty.
Baumholder, Germany
10 March 2015

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GI Ghost Town 07
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

A slot-casino in the bowling alley of Smith Barracks for US Military personnel.
Baumholder, Germany
10 March 2015

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GI Ghost Town 08
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

A slot-casino in the bowling alley of Smith Barracks for US Military personnel.
Baumholder, Germany
10 March 2015

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GI Ghost Town 09
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

Train tracks used specifically for transporting military vehicles to and from the Baumholder military training area remain still and silent.
Baumholder, Germany
11 March 2015

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GI Ghost Town 10
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

A sign advertising a local church for the US Military community hangs in a used car lot, just outside of Smith Barracks.
Baumholder, Germany
11 March 2015

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GI Ghost Town 11
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

A building which used to house a strip club, a discotheque, two restaurants, and two bars, now sits idly, as the businesses have moved on as have their American patrons.
Baumholder, Germany
11 March 2015

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GI Ghost Town 12
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

A space formerly used as a fast food restaurant in Baumholder lies vacant.
Baumholder, Germany
11 March 2015

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GI Ghost Town 13
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

The window of a wig shop outside of the main gate of Smith Barracks, which specializes in wigs for African American women.
Baumholder, Germany
12 March 2015

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GI Ghost Town 14
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

Construction for a new park in the city of Baumholder.
Baumholder, Germany
12 March 2015

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GI Ghost Town 15
Baumholder, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany
By Andrew Nunn
14 Mar 2015

Charles Benson, a migrant from Ghana, cleans the windows of his barber shop, waiting for customers.  “I heard there were about 20,000 Soldiers in Baumholder, so I came here.  Shortly after I got here, I realized that just wasn’t true.”
Baumholder, Germany
12 March 2015