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Estella: the Unique Mallorcan Sheepdog
Felanitx, Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
04 Feb 2016

‘Estella’ is a very cinematic and intimate four-minute piece. Estella is a very special sheep dog, a Ca de Bestiar, a breed unique to Mallorca. In this slice of rural life, we see her work with Miquel, a shepherd, as the twilight hour approaches on this Mediterranean island.

*English subtitled version: https://www.transterramedia.com/media/67629

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Estella: the Unique Mallorcan Sheepdo...
Felanitx, Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
04 Feb 2016

‘Estella’ is a very cinematic and intimate four-minute piece. Estella is a very special sheep dog, a Ca de Bestiar, a breed unique to Mallorca. In this slice of rural life, we see her work with Miquel, a shepherd, as the twilight hour approaches on this Mediterranean island.

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Drowning Civilizations: Turkey Dams T...
Halfeti and Hasankeyf, Turkey
By Ibrahim Karci
01 Mar 2015

February 2015
Halfeti and Hasankeyf, Turkey

The ancient village of Hasankeyf, located in southeast Turkey is said to be one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. Situated on the banks of the Tigris river, this picturesque village has settlement activity and artifacts pre-dating the Mesopotamian era. However, in 2015, that history, and the entire village, is set to be drowned when South West Anatolia (GAP) Dam project activates its latest installment and creates a large water reservoir that will engulf the village.

The villages inhabitants have been fighting the Turkish government for years, trying to cling onto their ancestral lands. However, it looks like their struggle is coming to an unsuccessful end and they are set to be relocated to a newly built village overlooking the old one.

If government plans move forward, Hasankeyf will face the same fate of the village of Halfeti, another ancient town located nearby on the Euphrates river. Halfeti's homes and ruins are now buried under the water reservoir of the Birecik Dam, also part of the GAP project. With the villages traditional livelihoods all but erased, the inhabitants have abandoned agriculture in place of lake tourism and moved to new homes either nearby or in the cities.

This story profiles the contemporary struggle of Hasankeyf through the eyes of one of its inhabitants. It also foreshadows the possible future for Hasankeyf by visiting the village of Halfeti, which has already been submerged by dam waters.

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Living Conditions “Extremely Bad” in ...
Jarabulus
By TTM Contributor 34
13 Feb 2015

Jarabulus, Syria
February 13, 2015

This video offers a rare glimpse of daily life in Jarabulus, an ISIS-controlled Syrian town on the border with Turkey, located around 120 km northwest of Aleppo.
Video contains interviews with two anonymous residents who complained about their economic conditions, saying that basic commodities are unaffordable while there are few employment opportunities.

The footage, which was shot secretly, shows what is believed to be ISIS headquarters destroyed by international coalition-led airstrikes. It also shows local residents in markets and agriculture fields inside and near Jarabulus.

Fighters from the Nusra Front, considered the Syrian branch of al-Qaeda, took over the town in 2013 and later pledged allegiance to ISIS. More than 200,000 Kurds and Arabs in Jarabulus and the surrounding villages have lived under ISIS since early 2014.

The name of the contributor has been withheld for security reasons.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Traveling of fields/ road sign “Jarablus”
Wide of destroyed bridge on river
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of destroyed buildings
Wide of ISIS religious teachings
Traveling of street
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of official printed announcements by ISIS posted outside a building/ close up of seal “The Islamic State, Department of Agriculture, Jarabulus District”
L-R pan of field
Wide of children sliding down a hill
Various of boat rowing in the Euphrates River
Wide of planted vegetables
Wide/ L-R pan of orchard
Various of sheep grazing
Close-up of a person cutting firewood
Various of woman cooking using a stove
Various of a woman milking a cow
Various of oil containers for sale on the roadside
Medium of man at fish market
Various of vegetables for sale at market
Wide of field and sheep herd
Traveling of people in an outdoor market
Various of clothes and shoes for sale
Various of spices for sale
Various of market
Various of crowd at market
Various of food items for sale
Wide/ traveling inside health center

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
09:54 – 12:16

“The situation is not good. I cannot say that we are comfortable. Our situation is very bad. A diesel barrel costs 20,000 [Syrian pounds]. How can we afford it? A gas canister costs 4,000 [Syrian pounds] and a liter of kerosene costs 225 pounds. A pack of bread costs 130 pounds. How can we afford this? I have two young men who are unemployed. Where can they go? “The [Islamic] State is good. They have caught the debauched and the thieves who have hurt people, but they provide electricity and water for only two hours [a day]. For more than a year, people have barely seen electricity. It is provided during two hours but the grid is overloaded and the current is interrupted after half an hour. The bakery was not functioning; they repaired it but bread is expensive. We cannot afford it. I bake bread myself.

“As for warplanes… Our houses have been fractured. These countries have formed a coalition against us. We live in a border town. Bombing goes on night and day.

“They should have bombed the tyrant who has deprived us of everything. He has ruined everything. Whenever our children went out to look for work they were accused of being criminals and caught. All our young men have been put in jail. What can we do? The situation is bad.

“We use firewood. We had olive trees but we cut them down and burned them in the stove to have heat in this cold weather.

“I have a cow. Animal feed is expensive. A kilogram of hay costs 50 pounds. A bale of barely that contains 40 kg costs 2,700 pounds. We need this cow to feed us. All the people who have cattle suffer the same crisis that we do. It is not only me; all of us suffer a bad situation. We wish that we die. There is not a single house that has not been fractured due to warplanes.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
12:17 – 13: 19

“Conditions under the Islamic State are extremely bad. Under the Islamic State, a barrel of diesel costs more than $100. A ton of firewood costs 22,000 [pounds]. This crisis has never been witnessed before.

“Nothing has improved under the Islamic State. Everything has deteriorated. They should create employment for the people. The people work in agricultural lands, which do not provide any revenue. We have abandoned our land. Not all the plots are being cultivated. People have cut down olive groves and used them as firewood. The situation is extremely miserable. There are no services and foreign countries are not providing aid. The Islamic State is in control of the situation. Turkey has closed the border and aid cannot reach people. The situation is very bad under the Islamic State.”

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Druze Sheikhs of Lebanon
Bekkifa
By Walid
15 Mar 2014

Sheikh Ali KREIDI: (Bekkifa) A shepherd since his childhood, he grew up in the house of his grandfather. He spent 15 years of his life with his herd of goats in the meadows, on the fringes of villages and their inhabitants in Jabal Al Sheikh. Today, he has a herd of 400 goats and earns his living from the sale of milk and fertilizer.

Cheikh Ali KREIDI: (Bekkifa) Berger depuis son enfance, il a grandi dans la maison de son grand père. Il a passé 15 ans de sa vie avec son troupeau de chèvres dans les prairies en marge des villages et de ses habitants à Jabal Al Cheikh. Aujourd'hui, il possède un troupeau de 400 de chèvres et gagne sa vie de la vente de lait et d'engrais.

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Fatih Yayla
Davraz, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Fatih, whose grandfather is a famous shepherd in Isparta, doesn't relate to the Yörük lifestyle and culture. Although, he works as a snowboard instructor on Davraz Mountain in the winter and enjoys life on the seaside of Antalya in the summers.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Women Shepherds
Çobanisa, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Shepherds move their herd to graze on the mountainside while dodging Mercedes, Hondas, Fords, Chevrolets, Audis and other various foreign cars.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Young Girl with Sheep
Çobanisa, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

A young girl, following her father and stray sheep, fixes her hair while keeping in line.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Shopping Sheep
Çobanisa, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Tradition mixes with modern life on this street corner in Çobanisa. The local market opens shop, but is challenged by sheep on their way home and the Audi that blocks their trail.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Bethlehem, Christmas 2012 (2 of 6)
Bethlehem, Palestine
By Mat Wolf
25 Dec 2012

A shepherd tends his flocks on Christmas morning in Bethlehem.

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Kurdish Nomads (1 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
11 May 2011

A Kurdish shepherd and patriarch of a nomadic family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON