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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

A child playing with child dog inside ship recycling yard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

School children playing near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 17
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 19
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 20
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

An old ship is maneuvered into place in a shipyard outside Dhaka where it will be either repaired or dismantled for parts and scrap metal.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 22
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 27
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

A child plays with her dog inside a ship recycling yard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 24
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

A child plays with her dog inside a ship recycling yard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 25
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

A child plays with her dog inside a ship recycling yard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 26
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

About 15,000 people work in extremely dangerous conditions and earn between $4 and $5 as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common. Shipyard workers say make very meager earnings, without proper safety, and surrounded by the smell of asbestos.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 28
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

Young children, mostly climate refugees from flooded areas of the country, work in the shipyards, collecting scrap metal and used oil to sell in local markets.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 16
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 18
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

A mid-size vessel sits in a boatyard outside Dhaka among old ships, ripe for recycling. Bangladesh is now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market, building vessels for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 21
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 23
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 14
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 02
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 07
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Most of the private shipyards use plate steel, engines, components and machinery from old merchant ships collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 01
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Shipyard workers pose for the camera in a year near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 11
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

A shipyard worker gets prepared to weld near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 09
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Two men are hard at work welding metal in a shipyard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 10
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Most of the private shipyards use plate steel, engines, components and machinery from old merchant ships collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 15
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

A boy stops to pose for a photo while playing near a ship recycling yard in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 13
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 05
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

17 year-old Ashraful has seen several of his colleagues fall victim to explosions, caused by ruptures in gas cylinders. He breaks down the rusty, old supertankers, cargo ships and cruisers to be scrapped. Most of them live by eating rice and vegetables. Ashraful cannot remember when he last ate meat.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 08
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

A man is hard at work welding metal in a shipyard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

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Recycling the Rubble of War in Gaza
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
20 Oct 2014

October 16, 2014
Gaza, Palestine

Gazans are salvaging construction materials from the rubble of buildings that were destroyed by Israeli military action in the 2014 summer war. Over 45,000 houses were destroyed in the war and the ongoing Israeli blockade is preventing Gazans from importing cement for rebuilding purposes. Instead, Gazans are left to find creative ways to rebuild their communities, including recycling rubble.

Burj Al Basha, in the heart of Gaza city, was completely demolished during the last Israeli war against Gaza. The building was one of the main landmarks in Gaza city. Its bombardment left huge amounts of rubble to the extent that it closed off two of the main streets in the city. Tens of workers using heavy equipment are trying to clear a path for the traffic. During the process workers try to recycle iron bars from the rubble to be used for future construction projects. They are also recycling pieces of concrete for street paving projects.

Abu Ali Daloul is one of the main traders of recycled iron bars in Gaza. He bought tons of the iron bars removed from the rubble of the recent war. He fixes the bars and prepares them to be used again for construction purposes.

The concrete rubble are transported to stone breaking workshops in order to be turned into pebbles for use on road paving projects. Abu Lebda is a stone breading workshop which recycles concrete rubble and provides brick manufacturers with pebbles to make bricks with

Malaka concrete bricks factory brings the pebbles from Abu Lebda's stone breaking workshop and puts the amounts in its stores hoping the cement to pass through the crossings to be able to produce bricks suffecient to rebuild Gaza.

Despite the strenuous efforts Gazans are undertaking to create new methods to rebuild their shattered communities, cement is still the biggest challenge for them as the blockade on the coastal enclave remains.

Shot List:
Shots of a machine breaking concrete in Burj Al Basha site.
Shots of a bulldozer removing the rubble.
Shots of workers collecting and rehabilitating iron bars.
Shots of Abu Ali Daloul's store for recycled construction iron bars
Shots of Abu Lebdda concrete stone breaking manufactory recycling the rubble
Shots of Malaka's concrete bricks factory

Interviews:

(02:00) Waleed, a worker in Burj al-Basha (man, Arabic):
"We are in Gaza at the gates of Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower) that was shelled by Israel. We modify iron so we can reuse it. We do this so we can rebuild Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower). As you know, the iron factories are not working, so we have to work with the rubble. We take the iron that came from the rubble of Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower) and we work on it so we can reuse it to rebuild the area."

(02:37) Mohamad, a worker in Burj al-Basha site (man, Arabic):
"We are now in front of Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower) , it is a factory for modifying iron. There are about 25 workers here in addition to a modifying expert. Our job is to remove the rubble from the buildings that were destroyed by Israel. We separate the iron from the concrete. We modify the iron and store it in a storage room to be reused in the future. And we also put the concrete in special storage units to be reused later, it can be used for construction or as asphalt for the roads. We work on re-appropriating iron from the buildings that were destroyed so we can use it in construction work or other things.

(04:06) Abu Ali Daloul, Iron trader in Gaza: We did not think of taking this as a profession before and we never thought about it. However, because of the destruction that happened, we had to resort to what we call 'self-sufficiency'. If the roads are closed and we are sieged, we need to build the country and we need this material. At first we started separating the iron, some of the iron is junk, some is appropriate for manufacturing. It can be used for construction, but mostly it is used for manufacturing, it can be used for shielding windows, making nails and other similar aspects. The rest of the iron which is in good condition goes to construction. The closest site to us was Burj al-Basha, and Burj al-zafer, and also in 8th street, there used to be a building near Ali Bin Abi Taleb Mosque. Its rubble blocked the road, so we had to remove them quickly because it was affecting the traffic. At the moment, all the iron that we have is from Burj al-Basha. We were able to take out of Burj al-Basha about 45 tons the first time we tried salvaging. Most of the iron we extracted is already sold, but the problem of the lack of concrete is what is postponing the construction process. No matter what, we will build our country, which our iron, our products, our work and effort.

(07:17) Abu Mohamad Abu lebdda, owner of a concrete breaking factory:
After the war, and after Israel had destroyed the houses and blocked paths, we did not have concrete entering Gaza. So we had to recycle the rubble, to produce concrete, and to make bricks to be used in construction. We also reuse the metal after adjusting it. As you can see, the workers here, separate the rubble from the wood, the clothes, plastic and of the remaining found under the rubble. We clean it then crush it using machines, and we produce gravel, the soft one for building bricks and the rough one is used as concrete.
As I already stated, there are two types of gravel, the rough one we call "lentil", used as concrete, and the soft one we call it "sesame seeds", used to build bricks.

(09:21) Lad Malaka:
We build these bricks from the gravel made by the rubble recycling factories in Gaza. This type of brick is used for building roofs. We need good quality, so the brick has to pass through a test, we take it and examine it near the Islamic University. This brick passed the test and was made according to the required quality. We increase the cement [the small amount of cement available, which is mixed with the rubble] a bit, and it gives us a great quality.

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Zabbaleen: A life in Cairo's garbages
Zabbaleen
By Simon Letellier
11 Jul 2013

The Zabbaleen are teenagers and adults who have served as Cairo's informal garbage collectors for approximately the past 70 to 80 years. Zabbaleen means "Garbage people" in Egyptian Arabic. The Zabbaleen are also known as Zarraba, which means "pig-pen operators."

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Flip Flop Recycling
Mombassa, Kenya
By Ruud Elmendorp
29 May 2013

A Kenyan company based in Nairobi is recycling flip flops left on the beach in Mombosa and turning them into art and household beauties. This cultivation of used flip flops is helping in cleaning the beaches around the area and providing jobs for a lot of nationals.