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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Passengers leaving the station. 30 Av-Grand Av station, Queens, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Elevated stations give different views of the road under the stations .Astoria Blwd station, Queens, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

One of the few elevated subway-stations on Manhattan.125 st station, Manhattan, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Trains are clearly visible out in the sun compared to normal subway stations. Parkchester station, Bronx, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Industrial buildings as neighbours. Due to noise it is mostly industrial buildings or shops next to the elevated subway stations. Gun Hill Rd station, Bronx, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Some stations have windows, giving passengers another kind of view of the road below. 233 street station, Bronx, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Strong colours ensure nobody will get hurt. Wakefield - 241 street station, Bronx, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Train arriving. Some buildings are built very close to the stations.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Man coming up to the platform at the elevated station. Handicapped and older people have problems using the elevated subway-stations due to lack of elevators. 121 street station at Jamaica avenue, Brooklyn, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Passengers are getting an interesting view of the streets through all stations. 121 street station at Jamaica avenue, Brooklyn, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Passengers waiting for approaching subway. 111 street station at Jamaica avenue, Brooklyn, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Man waiting for the subway under an American flag. Woodhaven Blvd station, Brooklyn, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

View of Manhattan skyline. taking a trip with the subway is a mini vacation with skyline and coast views. Smith and 9th Streets station, Brooklyn, New York

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

The view from the elevated subway-station. Due to the height the birds eye view creates interesting angles and shadows. Woodhaven Blvd station, Brooklyn, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Well dressed woman on an elevated subway-station. 18 Avenue station, Brooklyn, New York. This is a different look at the busy elevated subway stations of New York City, offering unique views of the shore and the skyline and the roads and houses beneath them.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
Brooklyn, New York
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Street next to elevated subway line. Many shops are located around the elevated subway-stations.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Beautiful windows. Some subway stations are decorated with beautiful windows or other decorations. Pelham Pkwy, Bronx, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Shops around elevated subway-station. Fast food restaurants and shops are located around the stations. Simpson street station, Bronx, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York ...
New York, USA
By Ulrik Pedersen
15 Apr 2013

Train arriving surrounded by shops and graffiti .30 Av-Grand Av station, Queens, New York.

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York
New York, USA
By Serene Yordi
15 Apr 2013

In New York the subway is often the second thing, after the skyline, visitors encounter and remember. For locals it’s both a blessing, fast and convenient, and a curse, overcrowded and noisy.

Immigration had changed New York during the first part of the 19th century when residents flooded Manhattan island creating a need for more public transport capacity than steamboats circling the island could provide. The first elevated line was constructed in 1867-70 (In 1870 a prototype underground subway was built but not finalized) along Greenwich Street and Ninth Avenue. Later more lines were built on 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 9th Avenue, all managed by Interborough Rapid Transit(IRT), an independent private company.

Outside New York (Brooklyn, Long island, Queens and parts of Bronx were not part of New York until 1898) the main train developments were connected to Coney Island, a major seaside resort for New Yorkers. In order to draw more visitors, the different resorts initiated funding of train-lines to Coney island with the first service starting in 1864, first as a horse-drawn line but from 1867 a steam railroad. Due to the commercial driven reasons for building the railways there were numerous lines owned by different companies with different rail sizes and specifications. This was changed in 1896, when the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Corporation (BRT), a holding company, came into existence, and by 1900 had taken over all lines in Brooklyn and Queens.

The first underground line was opened on October 27, 1904, going up and down 9th avenue (from City Hall to Bronx) on Manhattan. It was the start of a rapid expansion. The majority of the present-day subway system was either built or improved during the following 30 years. The city outsourced the expansion to BRT and the IRT but later, after the political claims that IRT and BRT were reaping profits at taxpayer expense, started a new system called IND (first called Independent City-Owned Subway but later changed to IND to follow the three-letter initialisms of the other systems) with first line starting operating on September 10, 1932.. All IND lines, except a short elevated one, were underground subways in Brooklyn, Bronx and Manhattan. In 1920 the last elevated subway-station was build in Brooklyn.

In 1940, the two private lines (BMT and IRT) were bought by the city. Most elevated lines were closed, especially on Manhattan, only leaving some in the Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens.

Today there are 468 stations, the highest number in the world, with 337 km of tracks across 4 of 5 boroughs (there is a line on Staten Island but not included under the New York Subway system) of New York. In 2012, the subway delivered over 1.65 billion rides,making it the seventh busiest rapid transit rail system in the world. Contrary to its name,but indicative of its history, the New York City Subway system is not entirely underground but has 40% at or above ground.

Elevated substations and lines offer sweeping views of the shore and the skyline and the roads and houses beneath them. New Yorkers and some tourist know how to take a scenic mini-vacation every day: on the elevated subway lines in Queens, Brooklyn and Bronx.

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New York Blackout Continues (7 of 10)
New York, USA
By Derek Henry Flood
01 Nov 2012

New York's vast subway transit system took on the air of a cavernous no-man's land as the blackout cause by Hurricane Sandy south of 34th continues into its 5th day.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A 'salaryman' waits to cross the street in downtown Tokyo.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A 'salaryman' in the subway. Tokyo is well-known as a commuter city, as many people commute in and out of the city mainly for work.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A white-collar worker smokes in downtown Tokyo.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A 'salaryman' in a train station in Tokyo. Tokyo is well-known as a commuter city, as many people commute in and out of the city mainly for work.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A 'salaryman' in the subway. Tokyo is well-known as a commuter city, as many people commute in and out of the city mainly for work.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

Three white-collar workers during a break at work. Mainly ‘middle-class’ freshman employees and general managers, this group of the japanese working population work extra hard and stay until late at the office.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

Three white-collar workers leaving a business building.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

Akihabara district in Tokyo. Also known as Akihabara Electronic Town, this area concentrates dozens of electronic goods based shops, mainly computer goods, video games, anime, and manga.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A white-collar worker ties his shoe at downtown in Tokyo.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

Skyline of the city of Tokyo. With a population of about 13,000,000 (2013) Tokyo is considered for many as a ‘working city’ due its huge working population.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A 'salaryman' in the subway. Tokyo is well-known as a commuter city, as many people commute in and out of the city mainly for work.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A 'salaryman' in the subway. Tokyo is well-known as a commuter city, as many people commute in and out of the city mainly for work.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A white-collar worker checks his mobile phone in downtown Tokyo. The life of the 'salaryman' mainly revolves around their work at the office.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
16 Jun 2011

A 'salaryman' sleeps in the subway. Heart attacks and strokes related to stress, lack of sleep and bad eating habits are the main medical reasons of deaths from overwork (known in Japan as Karoshi).