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Jello Biafra
Club Knust
By Ralf Falbe
03 Aug 2016

Punk singer Jello Biafra (Ex Dead Kennedys) performes live in the club Knust in Hamburg, Germany: "Nazi Trumps Fuck Off!".

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Slime
Hamburg
By Ralf Falbe
22 Dec 2015

Singer Dirk Jora of the German Punk Band Slime performs at the club Fabrik in Hamburg, Germany.

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Mad Monks Band Concert
Hamburg
By Ralf Falbe
22 Dec 2015

Concert Photography - Ska Band "Mad Monks" performs live in Hamburg, Germany.

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Uriah Heep
Hamburg
By Ralf Falbe
10 Dec 2015

Lead singer of Uriah Heep band, Bernie Shaw, performs at the club Fabrik, Hamburg, Germany.

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Chris Norman
Hamburg
By Ralf Falbe
15 Nov 2015

Chris Norman, former lead singer of the band 'Smokie', performs with the Chris Norman Band at the club Grosse Freiheit 36 in Hamburg, Germany on November 15, 2015.

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Mighty Oaks
Lüneburg
By Ralf Falbe
08 Aug 2015

Folk Rock Band The Mighty Oaks from Berlin at the Summertale´s Festival near Lüneburg in Germany.

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Body and Space: 'Contact' Improvisati...
Goa, India
By Nikhil Bhowmick
31 Jan 2015

The story of contact is unique in its genre. This movement-based art form, offers an experience that may challenge the performer to redefine his physical space, his self-awareness, and simply experience a deep connection with him or herself and others. Brought to India in the past few years, it has experienced an invigorating support by the Indian dance community. The Goa Contact festival, which takes place every year, gives away thirty plus scholarships for Indian dance students and dancers to further their awareness about Contact.
Erica Kaufman is one of the leading figures of Contact since the eighties. As a dancer, contact artist and yogini, she has extensively researched the ins and outs of physical movement across continents. While Erica gives us a brief definition of all the possibilities that could be contact, we also follow Lional Lishoy, a young actor, contact artist, music composer and dancer from Kerala, living in Bangalore, who is here as one of the scholarship trustees of the festival. Lional has gained the support of many from the international Contact community to become an anchor for contact practitioners in Bangalore, where it has emerged as an "alternative" art form.
His commentary is about his journey through contact, and what he expects out of it.

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Children's Circus Flourishes Despite ...
Kabul
By Sergey Ponomarev
10 Nov 2014

Surrounded by mountains and divided into sectors by concrete blast walls, there is a place in Kabul where you can dive into an atmosphere of colors and children’s joy. For the war-torn, landlocked Afghanistan – after more than three decades suffering from multiple invasions and religious conservatism - circus is giving Afghan youth a positive outlet: and they sure put on a show.

Vivid colors and girls singing and juggling still shocks conservative elders, but after a while their smiles give them away. Entering the door to the circus’ main center in Kabul means stepping into a world of fun and colors, where boys and girls practice together and take charge of their own learning.

The Circus was founded in 2002, less than a year after the fall of the Taliban regime, which banned music and dance. While NGOs and government programs focused on building roads, schools and basic education systems, David Mason, who was a former tango dance instructor, and his co-director Berit Muhlhausen, a former journalist, focused on introducing and developing soft values that bring children together and create joyful communities.

The first idea was an orphanage with space for creativity, but they wanted to reach as many kids as possible. A traveling circus proved an excellent opportunity. After all, circus is all about overcoming fear. It's about trust. It's based on non-verbal communication; it represents a multicultural tradition, and its purpose is to make people smile.

For the last 10 years, more than 2.7 million spectators in 25 provinces have enjoyed a performance or participated in one of the hundreds of workshops, despite the reality in Afghanistan that conservative society, especially in rural provinces of Afghanistan, doesn’t accept public arts.

“If we go to remote regions and perform in a very conservative area where mullahs will say ‘no,’ then we adjust our performance,” Berit said. “Maybe we perform without music, less joking, no signing, or we start with the prayer from the holy Quran; and then they relax and see that this is harmless and it’s not dangerous.”

Mohammed Sadat, 13, from Bamiyan dreamt to become a gymnast, and once he found a circus show in one of the schools, he joined them. In the future, he said, he sees himself in two ways: first, becoming a gymnastics coach for young kids, and second, studying and becoming an engineer to help reconstructing his country. For now, he is part of the acrobatic team that builds human pyramids during performances.

In the circus garden in Kabul, girls sing and juggle with clubs and tennis balls, while boys perform backward somersaults and cartwheels and form human pyramids. All together they stage educational performances on the importance of hygiene, school attendance, landmine awareness and malaria prevention. The main goal is to entertain and give joy to an audience of their peers from camps for internally displaced people, schools and orphanages.

Shamsot, 14, is the son of an high ranking officer in the Afghan military who chose to be a circus clown. “I’m really happy to see smiles on the faces of those poor kids,” he said. Berit and David were afraid that Shamsot’s parents wouldn’t be happy with what their son is doing, but after seeing the show they encouraged him to continue training and performing with the circus.

In its centers in Kabul and Bamiyan, and with the help of trained children in other provinces, the circus organizes festivals and joyful events each year, inspiring Afghans as well as internationals to forget the dust and the war for a while - to join the fun and smile a bit.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 01
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The Circus Bidone was born in France in 1976. Maintained by Francois Bidone, until today is the last itinerant circus that still moves with horses and carriages in the Berry area. The crew is formed by 7 carriages, 8 horses, one mule, one donkey, 8 artists, one responsible, one monkey, one henhouse and Francois Bidone.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 02
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The story about Francois Bidone is based on an itinerant life began in May '68 in France. His hands gave birth to the first carriage and then the next five. Francois is responsible with Benedicte about the whole organization: from the construction of new structures to the show at the choice of artists. Currently there are over forty years that Bidone Circus is in operation.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 03
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Laura is an italian artist of the theater circus. She is traveling with the circus from 4 years. She moved permanently to France and with Freddi, is the only girl in the company.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 04
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Nico and Freddo try the instruments during a break. Guitar and Fisarmonica accompany the circus troupe during moments of work and stall.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 05
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Laura is an aereal dancer. During the show she does two aerial performance with a tissue and with the hoop. Every day she has to fix the "verghe", the structure where they hung the tools available for her number.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 06
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

In moments of telage, great part of the equipment is disassembled and ready for departure, the artists eat fast food all together before going back to work.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 07
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Toma, french guy, is on road with Bidon’s Circus for a year. He mainly deals with parks horses and keeps responsibility throughout torunee. He has a wild personality and brings much cheerfulness in to the company.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 08
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

During the summer tornee rarely reprove parts of the show, called "returns". During some afternoon hours Francois follows the company giving advice about improving some numbers.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 09
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The Barrique is a carriage built by Francois for his son and is currently occupied by Freddo, musician of the company. When he has some free time he’s playing or practicing juggling with clubs, another of his passion.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 10
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The oldest carriage circus called La Vielle and is currently occupied by Laura and Pippo, couple both on stage and in personal life. Carriages are small and contain everything needed to an itinerant life; from clothes for the show to life memories.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 11
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

During the breaks Laura exercising with Fisarmonica, her great passion. She would like in the future to integrate it into one of her numbers. During the winter period she’s always looking for new job opportunities.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 12
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Pippo is a juggler and musician and he’s for more years at work with the circus Bidone. He’s always available when there is work. Pippo is very caring and responabile to the whole structure of the circus.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 13
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Coco is the clown of the company. Lives in the carriage Clarabelle, the only one built by a midget and not by Francois. Very young he’s the first year of employment with the circus. He’s quiet and peaceful person during daily life but becomes an excellent clown during the show.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 14
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Once the circus is located inside the municipal areas the show are programmed each day. The duration of a show is two hours. Artists must follow strictly the lineup and can not change the numbers.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 15
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Davelle is a Spanish guy on the first year of employment with the circus Bidone. He is represented as a juggler and as a clown. He knows how to mix the two techniques making fun and magical numbers.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 16
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Spaces used for backstage change depending on different locations. Sometimes the company can rely on wide spaces and sometimes they must be adapted. The carriages are used like a fifth stage.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 18
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Laura gets ready for the scene of Marionette while Toma waiting to prepare the horses. Carriage are very important in the show being the only ones available for costume changes.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 19
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Marcelo is the handyman of the company, one who helps and manages the technical parts. Here, through an umbrella, help Laura to switch between carriage without being seen by the audience.He’s alongside circus from 7 years.

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North Korea in Black and White 011
By Ulrik Pedersen
06 Jun 2014

shoes and shirts of school children singing at children's games days. Pyongyang, North Korea.

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Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
23 Apr 2014

Darashakran Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: more than four hundreds of syrian refugees kid sit at group of their school and look at clowns performance during their show.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (24 & 25 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

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A Warrior In High Heels
Cairo, Egypt
By Sergi Cabeza
18 Feb 2014

“A warrior in High Heels”

by Sergi Cabeza

It's the night before his solo performance, "Inside Out", a stage performance performed in three parts and Hazem has been in the theater all day long. He'll finish two evenings on the stage to finish his trilogy, The Nut, named after the Egyptian goddess of the sky who gave birth to the sun every morning. In his three-part dance show, he shows how Egyptian women gradually lost their importance in society through male domination. His last act addresses modern Egypt.

Hazem’s show crosses a red line that could land him in prison. In the final performance he straps on high heals, a bikini top, and struts down the stage in a catwalk. Several weeks after his show, three men were sentenced to three years in prison for debauchery, the Egyptian law used to condemn homosexuality. A fourth man was given eight years in prison on charges of running a brothel. Two of the men were accused of wearing women's clothes.

And here is Hazem on stage, dancing in his underwear, wearing a bra and a religious cap, taking off his clothes, as he slowly breaks free from a rope hanging from the ceiling that represents societal taboos.

His performance critiques how religion and men dominate his society's sexual norms. The first part was performed by eight women and the second with a mixed roster of boys and girls, but the final, solo act was to turn himself into a sexual transgressor before the eyes of the audience.

He was worried about getting arrested; however, nobody harassed him. Audiences cheered loudly at both of his sold out shows. He charged less than three dollars for tickets, despite the fact that this ticket price did not cover the rent of the theater, costumes and stage crew. A few days after his final show, he received an invitation from Tunisia, where he is due to perform in the beginning of May.

This was not the first time he faced his fears, faced his society and came out even more determined to succeed. In July 2011, Hazem walked into the center of Tahrir Square during an demonstration calling for an Islamic State. He went topless in front of the hardcore, ultra conservative crowds surrounding him and shouted against them.

“He acts in the stage as he is in the streets,” says his proud friend Diego. “He is a warrior in high heels.”

This video includes an interview with Hazem and images of his show.

Note for Sales: Hazem didn't want to give his last name.

SHOT LIST:

The show took place in the Rawabet theatre of Cairo, Egypt, the 18th of February of 2014

-0' 00'' Hazem during one of his rehearsals in the Italian Institute of Culture in Cairo some one week before the premiere of the show.

-0' 14'' Hazem interview.

-0' 20'' Hazem smokes a shish in the morning a day before the show.

-0' 25'' Walking in Cairo towards the theatre the day before the show.

-0' 33'' At the door of the theatre the day before the show.

-0' 38'' Hazem got some flowers sent to him the day before the show.

-0' 42'' Hazem interview

-0' 48'' Hazem during the show

-0' 55'' Hazem interview

-1' 02'' Hazem rehearsing in the theatre the day before the show

-1' 11'' Hazem interview

-1' 17'' Connecting the computer in the control room of the theatre the day before the show

-1' 22'' View of the theatre the day before the show.

-1' 26'' Another view of the theatre, from the stage.

-1' 30'' Hazem interview

-1' 35'' A view of the stage some hours before the show. Workers spread smashed coal as Hazem looks.

-1' 38'' The entrance to the theatre shortly before the show starts.

-1' 42'' People gathering outside the theatre minutes before the show.

-1' 47'' Hazem interview.

-1' 56'' Hazem strips during the show to remain only in his underwear.

-2' 15'' Hazem interview

-2' 21'' Dancing over religious music during the show

-2' 31'' Hazem interview

-2' 37'' The show is finished. People cheers as Hazem thanks the audience.

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he 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
26 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey. 11th September 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. © Claudia Wiens

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he 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
26 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey. 11th September 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. © Claudia Wiens

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Winnie Madikizela-Mandela launches he...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
17 Sep 2013

Traditoinal Indian dancers perfom during the launching ceremony of the book 491 days by Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, the Mother of the Nation, in Sibaya, South Africa

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou Rahme work collaboratively from their base in Ramallah, Palestine across a range of sound, image, installation, and performance. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Transterra Editor
10 Sep 2013

TURKEY, ISTANBUL: The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Wall by Jorge Mendez Blake. © Claudia Wien

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Afghanistan circus 03
Bamiyan, Afghanistan
By Sergey Ponomarev
18 May 2013

Children from the Sour Khdar school attend a show performed by other children in their school yard, in Bamiyan.

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Afghanistan circus 10
Bamiyan, Afghanistan
By Sergey Ponomarev
18 May 2013

Members of the circus wait for their turn to perform, watching the performance behind a curtain in their makeshift classroom in Bamiyan.

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Afghanistan circus 20
Bamiyan, Afghanistan
By Sergey Ponomarev
18 May 2013

Afghan children smile while watching one of the mobile circus' performances in Bamiyan.

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Afghanistan circus 21
Bamiyan
By Sergey Ponomarev
17 May 2013

Mohammed Sadat, 13, practices juggling with his fellow circus performers in Bamiyan.