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Roti
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
By Dominic.J.Lucarelli
24 Jun 2012

Spinning roti dough in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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Butcher
Jakarta, Indonesia
By Dominic.J.Lucarelli
08 Jun 2012

A butcher at a morning market in Jakarta, Indonesia.

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"Living the Love" - Documentary about...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
By Gloria Kurnik
08 Feb 2012

In depth portrait of the Hindu Thaipusam festival held annually in Malaysia in January. A unique take on the events through the eyes of a participating couple.
This short documentary is produced in a "personal journey" or "character driven" style.

Synopsis:
Piercing the body out of faith is a custom in most of the oldest religions. Though it may induce fear, doubt and anxiety, it is also associated with a certain sense of mysticism and spirituality. The viewer witnesses here the Thaipusam - the magical Hindu festival where devotees in a state of trance, painlessly carry offerings in the form of heavy burdens and/or have a range of intriguing attachments hooked to their body.

But beyond the images of unbelievable crowds and fanfare, the viewer can also witness the love, trust and devotion merging into an expression of faith through self-sacrifice.

For many, Thaipusam is all about the flourish and the obscure customs. For many tourists, it is the defining evidence of the unique multi-cultural life in Malaysia. For many amateur photographers, it’s one of those places where you capture that ‘one’ unforgettable picture. For some it's a story of love...

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Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Volunteers joined the first organized coastal clean-up last July 17, 2011. They are sorting out the garbages they picked up.

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

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Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Volunteers joined the first organized coastal clean-up last July 17, 2011. Different slippers, sandals and shoes are picked-up during the clean-up.

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

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Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Volunteers joined the first organized coastal clean-up last July 17, 2011

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

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Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Volunteers joined the first organized coastal clean-up last July 17, 2011

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

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Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Volunteers joined the first organized coastal clean-up last July 17, 2011

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

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Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Timelapse photography of coastal lagoon clean-up taken last July 17, 2011.

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

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West Papuan Refugees
Vanimo, Papua New Guinea
By David Fedele
16 Feb 2011

For nearly 50 years, the people of West Papua have suffered under brutal Indonesian colonial rule and it is estimated that hundreds of thousands of civilians have lost their lives in Indonesian military operations.

Thousands have fled across the border into neighbouring Papua New Guinea to seek sanctuary.

This footage was taken on Wednesday 16th February, 2011, in the jungle near Vanimo, Sandaun Province, Papua New Guinea - less than 50km from the West Papuan/Indonesian border.

It shows West Papuan refugees returning to their village for the first time since it was burnt three weeks earlier by special operation "Sunset Merona", led by Papua New Guinea Police and Defence Force.

The men came out of hiding in the bush to talk to me, and the women were able to leave for only a couple of hours where they were being held, as they told their captors they were looking for food from the garden. After I left, the men went back into the bush to hide, and the women returned to where they were being held.

Now two years later, my understanding is that many of these refugees are still unable to return to their village, and remain hiding in the jungle, on the run from special operation Sunset Merona.

This footage is clear evidence of contravention of the UN Charter for Refugees by Papua New Guinea, and also raises major questions about the legality of special operation Sunset Merona, and the alleged involvement of the Indonesian Government in pressuring the Papua New Guinea authorities to undertake these raids.

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Sulphur Mines at Kawah Ijen Indonesia 2
Kawah Ijen, Indonesia
By Transterra Editor
19 Jan 2011

In the remote East Java, Indonesia lies the ominous Kawah Ijen volcano, topped with an immense crater and a 200-meter-deep lake of sulfuric acid. It is within this precarious work environment where miners spend their days, hacking chunks of cooled sulfur with steel bars and ferrying up and down the mountain twin basket loads that weigh between 130 and 220 pounds. As they break up sulfur, they are perpetually engulfed in a cloud of smoke. Respiratory issues are rife among the workers because of this, who brave their surroundings with minimal to no protection. There is little pay-off for this sacrifice, as the daily earnings range from a mere $8 - $12. Gloves and gas masks are an unaffordable luxury.

An active vent at the edge of the lake is a source of elemental sulphur, and is what supports the mining operation. Escaping volcanic gases are channelled through a network of ceramic pipes, which causes the condensation of molten sulfur. The sulfur, which is deep red in colour when molten, pours slowly from the ends of these pipes and pools on the ground, turning bright yellow as it cools. It is this sulfur that keeps the miners returning every day despite the danger posed to their health, desperate to make a living.

Photos By: Jeffrey Bright

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (9 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

Local Lao children sell a wishing bird to set free for $1 USD to tourists at Pak Ou Cave in Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (8 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

A young girl walks in the dirty street with minimal clothing and no shoes in a village near Luang Prabang. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (7 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

Kid shoes on the dirty ground in a village near Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (6 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

Children with bare feet play at Pak Ou Cave in Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (5 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

Local Lao children sell a wishing bird to set free for $1 USD to tourists at Pak Ou Cave in Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (4 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

A barefoot Lao boy plays in a village near Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (3 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

A group of young girls sell crafts in Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (2 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

A young girl sells crafts in the village streets near Luang Prabang. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (1 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and its life expectancy is extremely low.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (15 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
02 Aug 2008

A women stands outside of the house made with wood having rain leak in floating village Tonle Sap lake, one of areas suffer severe poverty.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (17 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
02 Aug 2008

Children in floating village at Tonle Sap lake, one of areas where suffer severe poverty.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (2 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
02 Aug 2008

Children look out from a poorly constructed with wooden flame house that has water leak during rain in a village near Siem Reap.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (1 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
02 Aug 2008

A poorly constructed with wood is seen in a village by Tonle Sap lake, one of areas that suffer severe poverty.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (14 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
01 Aug 2008

A child play in stream with a dirt water in agricultural area near Siem Reap that was affected severely by drought weather.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (16 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
01 Aug 2008

A house with woods is seen in floating village in Tonle Sap lake, one of areas that suffer severe poverty near Siem Reap. Poorly constructed house suffer with leaking rain.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (18 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
01 Aug 2008

Children of a family in agricultural area that was affected severely by drought near Siem Reap.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (19 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
01 Aug 2008

A child and his grandmother of family in area that was affected severely by drought near Siem Reap.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (20 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
01 Aug 2008

Children play in the dried field in area that was affected severely by drought near Siem Reap.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (6 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
01 Aug 2008

A cambodian girl awaits in the rain while her brothers drain rain waters in their wooden house on stilts in Floating Village, one of areas most suffering severe poverty, in Siem Reap, Cambodia July 2008.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (7 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
30 Jul 2008

A Cambodian girl rest from gathering water bottles while taking shelter from the rain on Angkor Wat site in Siem Reap, Cambodia in July 2008. Gathering bottles, which each bottle is akin to $1, is one of the ways to make money for children.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (5 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
30 Jul 2008

A Cambodian girl is seen at Angkor Wat site in Siem Reap, Cambodia. Many children spend their day begging or selling at Angkor Wat, the world heritage site that attracts a number of tourists.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (4 of 20)
siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
30 Jul 2008

Children play on Angkor Wat site in Siem Reap, Cambodia. Many children are out of school due to poverty.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (3 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
30 Jul 2008

A Cambodian girl rest from gathering water bottles while taking shelter from the rain on Angkor Wat site in Siem Reap, Cambodia in July 2008. Gathering bottles, which each bottle is akin to $1, is one of the ways to make money for children.

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Children in poverty, Cambodia (8 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
28 Jul 2008

Cambodian girls rest from gathering water bottles while taking shelter from the rain on Angkor Wat site in Siem Reap, Cambodia. Gathering bottles, which each bottle is akin to $1, is one of the ways to make money for children in Cambodia.