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View from East Ukraine 27
Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
By lordcob
18 Feb 2014

Pupils training MMA under the supervion of Egor Slavianov, 25. He is a trainer expert in Mixed Martial Arts, raises his hands and said that the chairman was right, he was personally there with its group of friends, which he calls, People Militia (Narodonoe Opolcenie): “Our group, is for mainting peace and security in our city, we are not pro-government or with the right sector, we are neutral but we don’t want to have violence in the streets and we try to prevent it, that’s why we tried to stop armed people to mix with the peaceful protesters and we later help defending the city hall, people often called us Titushki but we are not, there are Titushki and the government uses them as provocators, but we don’t like them too.”

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View from East Ukraine 28
Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
By lordcob
18 Feb 2014

Anti government supporters marching in Dnepropetrovsk.

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View from East Ukraine 29
Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
By lordcob
18 Feb 2014

Yatsenuk, head of Baktishina party of Yulia Timoshenko facing Lenin in Denpropetrovssk. Hennadiy Korban and his partner Borys Filatov, decided to show live broadcast of raucous antigovernment protests at Independence Square in Kiev in their shoping mall, "the Passage".

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View from East Ukraine 20
Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
By lordcob
18 Feb 2014

Pupils training MMA under the supervion of Egor Slavianov, 25. He is a trainer expert in Mixed Martial Arts, raises his hands and said that the chairman was right, he was personally there with its group of friends, which he calls, People Militia (Narodonoe Opolcenie): “Our group, is for mainting peace and security in our city, we are not pro-government or with the right sector, we are neutral but we don’t want to have violence in the streets and we try to prevent it, that’s why we tried to stop armed people to mix with the peaceful protesters and we later help defending the city hall, people often called us Titushki but we are not, there are Titushki and the government uses them as provocators, but we don’t like them too.”

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View from East Ukraine 21
Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
By lordcob
18 Feb 2014

A rose left at the feet of the policemen guarding the city hall.

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View from East Ukraine 23
Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
By lordcob
18 Feb 2014

gor Slavianov, 25, a trainer expert in Mixed Martial Arts, raises his hands and said that the chairman was right, he was personally there with its group of friends, which he calls, People Militia (Narodonoe Opolcenie): “Our group, is for mainting peace and security in our city, we are not pro-government or with the right sector, we are neutral but we don’t want to have violence in the streets and we try to prevent it, that’s why we tried to stop armed people to mix with the peaceful protesters and we later help defending the city hall, people often called us Titushki but we are not, there are Titushki and the government uses them as provocators, but we don’t like them too.”

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View from East Ukraine 24
Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
By lordcob
18 Feb 2014

upils training MMA under the supervion of Egor Slavianov, 25. He is a trainer expert in Mixed Martial Arts, raises his hands and said that the chairman was right, he was personally there with its group of friends, which he calls, People Militia (Narodonoe Opolcenie): “Our group, is for maintaining peace and security in our city, we are not pro-government or with the right sector, we are neutral but we don’t want to have violence in the streets and we try to prevent it, that’s why we tried to stop armed people to mix with the peaceful protesters and we later help defending the city hall, people often called us Titushki but we are not, there are Titushki and the government uses them as provocateurs, but we don’t like them too.”

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View from East Ukraine 12
Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
By lordcob
18 Feb 2014

A picketing in front of Yanukovich supermarket chain Epi-Centre.

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View from East Ukraine 12
Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
By lordcob
18 Feb 2014

A lady picketing in fron of EPI-CENTER a supermarket chain belonging to Yanukovich, the sign says Business of Party of region.

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View from East Ukraine 13
Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
By lordcob
18 Feb 2014

A pro maidan activist gives a pro-maidan badge (ukrainian flag) to a passing car.

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View from East Ukraine 14
Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
By lordcob
18 Feb 2014

Women and children demonstrating in Dnepropetrovsk.

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View from East Ukraine 18
Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
By lordcob
18 Feb 2014

A singer at a pro-Yanukovich rally in front of the city hall.

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Students Protest in Venezuela
By Carlos Hernandez
18 Feb 2014

Students go out to the streets to protest against the government in Caracas, Venezuela.

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A View From East Ukraine
Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
By lordcob
17 Feb 2014

Following the river Dnepr, 500 km east of Kiev, sits the city of Dnepropetrovsk, with its million inhabitants. Famous for a forbidden city during the Soviet time where rockets and nuclear weapons were built, now, remaining heavily industrial, it is known as one of the strongholds of Ukrainian President Yanukovich in Eastern Ukraine.

Regardless of this fact, hundreds of protesters meet every day in Europe Square to show their support to the occupation of Maidan Nezalezhnosti (Independence Square), the main square in the capital, which has been occupied since end of November to protest the turn of Yanukovich on the signature of an association agreement in Vilnius, an important step toward European integration. Pictured in the following photo essay are unique shots of the people of this eastern city, both those who support the protest movement in Kiev and those who are against it.

ARTICLE:

Following the river Dnepr, 500 km east of Kiev, sits the city of Dnepropetrovsk with its million inhabitants. Famous for being, during Soviet time a forbidden city, where rockets and nuclear weapons were built, now, remaining heavily industrial, is one of the strongholds of Ukrainian president Yanukovich in Eastern Ukraine.

Regardless of this fact, hundreds of protesters meet every day in Europe square to show their support to the occupation of Maidan Nezalezhnosti (Independence Square), the main square in the capital, which has been occupied since end of November to protest the turn of Yanukovich on the signature of an association agreement in Vilnius, an important step toward European integration. What was initially a demand to reconsider the agreement, became a firm request to Yanukovich to resign. Maxim Goshovski, 25, just came back from Kiev, where he brought support, together with 50 other fellow citizens who live in a tent on Maidan, during the violent riots of Hrushevskoho Street.

The protests in Dnepropetrosk were more peaceful, reminding the ones in Kiev during the month of december. Actions included picketing of some of Yanukovich properties, such as the supermarket chain Epi-Centre. During the weekend, the number of protesters grew to several hundred people, with women and children marching towards the City Hall and handing flowers to the riot policemen who surrounded it. To quantify their absolute number is difficult because, as Vitaly Fylovyat, 24, says, the people in Dnepropetrovsk do not like to share their opinion in general, and now there is definitely fear to express them. Stepan Klimov, 37, normally a IT manager and acting as a blogger for the protest, was brought into a tent and beaten. “ They were "Titushkas" (government hired thugs), they saw on which side I was and they wanted to give me a lesson,” he said.

In the Regional Library every week, Anton Rusanov, 28, gathered several NGOs to guide a discussion about the current situation to try to prevent a further radicalization of the conflict. “We are not pro-government but we would like to have a stable one, our way of influencing politics is through dialogue, not through riots and disorders,” he said. The reciprocal mistrust on both sides is growing and they both accuse the media to be biased. Anton showed the listeners a video of the main moment of violence in Dnepropetrovsk, the day when a group of anti-government “Ultras” tried to break into the City Hall, in which a person is wildly beaten by a group of masked men. “As you can see anti-government supporters show only the last part of the video, without the beginning in which a large number of anti-government radicals are slowly gathering together with peaceful anti-Maidan protesters and nobody, even policemen, did anything.”

Egor Slavianov, 25, a trainer expert in Mixed Martial Arts, raised his hand and said that the chairman was right, he was personally there with his group of friends, which he calls the People Militia (Narodonoe Opolcenie): “Our group is for maintaining peace and security in our city, we are not pro-government or with the right sector, we are neutral but we don’t want to have violence in the streets and we try to prevent it, that’s why we tried to stop armed people from mixing with the peaceful protesters. We later helped defending the city hall. People often called us Titushki but we are not. There are Titushki and the government uses them as provocators, but we don’t like them too.”

This kind of support is particularly encouraged by the government and the Mayor of Dnepropetrovsk, Ivan Kulichenko, through a City Hall decree, that formalized these sportsmen militias. There are now 82 different formations who have rights to ask for documents, bring people to the police stations and use any kind of weapons except guns.

The situation fell uncertain and in Eastern Ukraine, the richest part of the country, where most of the large industries are located, many factory workers support Yanukovich. One of these supporters are Eughenyi Valdimirovich, 60, a recently retired employee of a large mechanical factory, who explained, “It makes more sense to us to have an economical relationship with Russia, we sell to them and we also get their energy to run our factories.” There is a large fear that these obsolete factories would have to close down, if entering in Europe, because they wouldn’t comply with European ISO standards. “I really don’t like what is happening in Kiev”, Eughenyi continues, “the protesters wants to be in Europe without using any European method at all and we need stability, not chaos”.

Pavlov Vasily, 42, a university technician, is definitely for a strong government: “If I will not vote for Yanukovich again, it will be for the way he handled this protests. In Europe they would have never allowed people to occupy the main square of the country, it would have been quickly repressed. Yanukovich is a self-made man, our American dream, and yes, he has his own interest and he acts like an oligarch. But isn’t it the Italian ex-president Berlusconi an oligarch too? But people still vote for him and in a democracy you should respect this. I don’t like to live in an unstable situation like and if safety come at the price of freedom then I really wouldn’t mind if Ukraine would be like Belarus.”

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Venezuela Student Protests 7
Caracas
By Manaure Quintero
15 Feb 2014

Student protesters mark the floor with their hand prints during a demonstration in front of the Judiciary office in Caracas.

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Venezuela Student Protests 10
Caracas
By Manaure Quintero
15 Feb 2014

Protesters cover their mouths from tear gas during clashes between protesters and national police in Caracas, February 15, in a demonstration against Nicolas Maduro's government.

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Venezuela Student Protests 12
Caracas
By Manaure Quintero
15 Feb 2014

A student holding Venezuela's flag in front of riot police during clashes between protesters and National Police in Caracas.

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Venezuela Student Protests 11
Caracas
By Manaure Quintero
12 Feb 2014

The body of protester Bassil Dacosta lies on the ground after he was shot in the head during clashes between students and unidentified armed people in Caracas.

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Venezuela Student Protests 6
Caracas
By Manaure Quintero
12 Feb 2014

Protesters run from a Police Patrol on fire during clashes in Caracas.

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Venezuela Student Protests
By Manaure Quintero
12 Feb 2014

In the protests that have turned violent in Venezuela, at least 10 people were killed and more than a hundred were injured, as thousands continue to take to the streets, asking the Venezuelan Government to release students who were detained during protests in San Cristobal City. People are demonstrating against the government's crackdown on dissent, restrictions of freedom of speech and the arrest of Leopoldo Lopez.

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Hrushevskoho Street Aftermath 6
Kiev, Ukraine
By Yaroslav Radionov
08 Feb 2014

Police stand on their side of Hrushevskoho street during diplomatic negotiations.

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Hrushevskoho Street Aftermath 9
Kiev, Ukraine
By Yaroslav Radionov
08 Feb 2014

Rebels rest near barricades on Hrushevskoho street, Kiev.

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Hrushevskoho Street Aftermath 2
Kiev, Ukraine
By Yaroslav Radionov
08 Feb 2014

Crosses on a buffer zone symbolized died rebels. Hrushevskoho street, Kiev.

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Hrushevskoho Street Aftermath 8
Kiev, Ukraine
By Yaroslav Radionov
08 Feb 2014

Building on a line of burning barricades covered by soot. First floor burned down. Hrushevskoho street, Kiev.

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Hrushevskoho Street Aftermath 7
Kiev, Ukraine
By Yaroslav Radionov
08 Feb 2014

Rebels burned wheels to prevent police attack. The barricades are extinguished in the morning.

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Hrushevskoho Street Aftermath 3
Kiev, Ukraine
By Yaroslav Radionov
08 Feb 2014

Crosses on a buffer zone symbolized dead rebels. Kiev, Hrushevskoho street.

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Hrushevskoho Street Aftermath 1
Kiev, Ukraine
By Yaroslav Radionov
08 Feb 2014

Barricade on Hrushevskoho street, Kiev. On left - portrait of president Yanukovich with bullet hole on his forehead.

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The Frontline of Kiev 28
Kiev, Ukraine
By Daniel Van Moll
05 Feb 2014

A woman kneeling down for prayer in occupied Hrushevskoho Street between riot police and heavy barricades .

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The Frontline of Kiev 27
Kiev, Ukraine
By Daniel Van Moll
05 Feb 2014

The mothers of activists involved in the "EuroMaidan" movement demonstrate between riot police and heavy barricades at occupied Hrushevskoho Street in Kiev, Ukraine.

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The Frontline of Kiev 26
Kiev, Ukraine
By Daniel Van Moll
05 Feb 2014

Activists at occupied Hrushevskoho Street protesting between the heavy barricades and riot police in Kiev, Ukraine.

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The Frontline of Kiev 25
Kiev, Ukraine
By Daniel Van Moll
05 Feb 2014

A protester wearing a Guy Fawkes mask is standing on a burned bus that became part of the barricades on occupied Hrushevskoho Street, watching the demonstration of women and priests between the barricades and Ukrainian riot police.

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The Frontline of Kiev 24
Kiev, Ukraine
By Daniel Van Moll
05 Feb 2014

A masked protester standing on a burned bus that became part of the heavy barricades on occupied Hrushevskoho Street, watching the demonstration of women and priests between the barricades and Ukrainian riot police.

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Ukraine Uprising 1
Kiev, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
30 Jan 2014

Since November, various Ukrainian opposition groups are protesting at Maidan plaza for the departure of the current president, Mr. Yanukovych and his entire government. After weeks of stand off, last week saw regular urban clashes between protestors and polices forces. Enough pressure forced the current government to see its prime minister resign. However, though seen as a first step, the opposition wants to go further with the departure of the president himself. Today, a tense stand off reigns between government forces and the protestors who have organized into a small army armed with baseball bats and other makeshift weapons and protected by barricades. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Polaris Images)

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Ukraine Uprising 2
Kiev, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
30 Jan 2014

A poster of former prime minister Yulia Tymoshenko near Maidan Square. Since November various Ukrainian opposition groups are protesting at Maidan plaza for the departure of the current president, Mr. Yanukovych and his entire government. After weeks of stand off, last week saw regular urban clashes between protestors and polices forces. Enough pressure forced the current government to see its prime minister resign. However, though seen as a first step, the opposition wants to go further with the departure of the president himself. Today, a tense stand off reigns between government forces and the protestors who have organized into a small army armed with baseball bats and other makeshift weapons and protected by barricades.

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Ukraine Uprising 3
Kiev, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
30 Jan 2014

A protestor is keeping warm in freezing temperature in Maidan Square. Since November various Ukrainian opposition groups are protesting at Maidan plaza for the departure of the current president, Mr. Yanukovych and his entire government. After weeks of stand off, last week saw regular urban clashes between protestors and polices forces. Enough pressure forced the current government to see its prime minister resign. However, though seen as a first step, the opposition wants to go further with the departure of the president himself. Today, a tense stand off reigns between government forces and the protestors who have organized into a small army armed with baseball bats and other makeshift weapons and protected by barricades.

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Ukraine Uprising 4
Kiev, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
30 Jan 2014

Opposition protestors are keeping warm around a fire in Maidan Square. Since November various Ukrainian opposition groups are protesting at Maidan plaza for the departure of the current president, Mr. Yanukovych and his entire government. After weeks of stand off, last week saw regular urban clashes between protestors and polices forces. Enough pressure forced the current government to see its prime minister resign. However, though seen as a first step, the opposition wants to go further with the departure of the president himself. Today, a tense stand off reigns between government forces and the protestors who have organized into a small army armed with baseball bats and other makeshift weapons and protected by barricades.

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Ukraine Uprising 5
Kiev, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
30 Jan 2014

A young armed protestor is keeping watch inside the occupied city hall of Kiev. Since November various Ukrainian opposition groups are protesting at Maidan plaza for the departure of the current president, Mr. Yanukovych and his entire government. After weeks of stand off, last week saw regular urban clashes between protestors and polices forces. Enough pressure forced the current government to see its prime minister resign. However, though seen as a first step, the opposition wants to go further with the departure of the president himself. Today, a tense stand off reigns between government forces and the protestors who have organized into a small army armed with baseball bats and other makeshift weapons and protected by barricades.