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Bujumbura Protests 08
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
11 May 2015

Despite a ban on demonstrations by the National Security Council of Burundi, protesters from various neighbourhoods of the capital Bujumbura took to the streets on this Monday in large numbers compared to the previous days, to say no to the third term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Bujumbura Protests 09
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
11 May 2015

Despite a ban on demonstrations by the National Security Council of Burundi, protesters from various neighbourhoods of the capital Bujumbura took to the streets on this Monday in large numbers compared to the previous days, to say no to the third term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Bujumbura Protests 10
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
11 May 2015

Despite a ban on demonstrations by the National Security Council of Burundi, protesters from various neighbourhoods of the capital Bujumbura took to the streets on this Monday in large numbers compared to the previous days, to say no to the third term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Bujumbura Protests 11
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
11 May 2015

Despite a ban on demonstrations by the National Security Council of Burundi, protesters from various neighbourhoods of the capital Bujumbura took to the streets on this Monday in large numbers compared to the previous days, to say no to the third term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Bujumbura Protests 12
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
11 May 2015

Despite a ban on demonstrations by the National Security Council of Burundi, protesters from various neighbourhoods of the capital Bujumbura took to the streets on this Monday in large numbers compared to the previous days, to say no to the third term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Bujumbura Protests 13
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
11 May 2015

Despite a ban on demonstrations by the National Security Council of Burundi, protesters from various neighbourhoods of the capital Bujumbura took to the streets on this Monday in large numbers compared to the previous days, to say no to the third term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Bujumbura Protests 14
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
11 May 2015

Despite a ban on demonstrations by the National Security Council of Burundi, protesters from various neighbourhoods of the capital Bujumbura took to the streets on this Monday in large numbers compared to the previous days, to say no to the third term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Bujumbura Protests 15
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
11 May 2015

Despite a ban on demonstrations by the National Security Council of Burundi, protesters from various neighbourhoods of the capital Bujumbura took to the streets on this Monday in large numbers compared to the previous days, to say no to the third term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Bujumbura Protests 16
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
11 May 2015

Despite a ban on demonstrations by the National Security Council of Burundi, protesters from various neighbourhoods of the capital Bujumbura took to the streets on this Monday in large numbers compared to the previous days, to say no to the third term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Bujumbura Protests 17
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
11 May 2015

Despite a ban on demonstrations by the National Security Council of Burundi, protesters from various neighbourhoods of the capital Bujumbura took to the streets on this Monday in large numbers compared to the previous days, to say no to the third term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Bujumbura Protests 18
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
11 May 2015

Despite a ban on demonstrations by the National Security Council of Burundi, protesters from various neighbourhoods of the capital Bujumbura took to the streets on this Monday in large numbers compared to the previous days, to say no to the third term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Bujumbura Protests 19
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
11 May 2015

Despite a ban on demonstrations by the National Security Council of Burundi, protesters from various neighbourhoods of the capital Bujumbura took to the streets on this Monday in large numbers compared to the previous days, to say no to the third term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Bujumbura Protests 20
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
11 May 2015

Despite a ban on demonstrations by the National Security Council of Burundi, protesters from various neighbourhoods of the capital Bujumbura took to the streets on this Monday in large numbers compared to the previous days, to say no to the third term bid of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Bujumbura Students Take Refuge Near U...
Bujumbura, Burundi
By Alex Pritz
09 May 2015

Around 500 students have been living on the streets, and, when it rains, in the halfway built building next to the US embassy in Bujumbura. Students, many of whom are politically active, say this is the only place they can feel safe in a city being rocked by protests and a violent police crackdown.

An eerie calm exists in the students building. Ears are glued to the sides of cell phones and radios, searching for information about the protests and the flag of the US embassy drifts lazily in the wind, just a stone's throw from the students makeshift settlement.

Yet students have self-organized to provide for their basic needs. A cleaning crew sweeps up the construction debris to make room for a new set of beds, while medical students treat a young man for pneumonia and others prepare rice for the day's meal.

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Bujumbura University Students 01
Bujumbura
By Alex Pritz
08 May 2015

Medical students from the University of Burundi examines a patient with hypertension inside the abandoned building adjacent the US embassy in Bujumbura. Students have been living on the street outside the embassy, and using the adjacent building for shelter since universities closed due to the protests.

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Bujumbura University Students 02
Bujumbura
By Alex Pritz
08 May 2015

A sixth year medical student from the University of Burundi examines a patient with hypertension inside the abandoned building adjacent the US embassy in Bujumbura. Students have been living on the street outside the embassy, and using the adjacent building for shelter since universities closed due to the protests.

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Bujumbura University Students 03
Bujumbura
By Alex Pritz
08 May 2015

Students find some rest in the half-constructed building next to the US embassy in Bujumbura. Students have been living on the street outside the embassy, and using the adjacent building for shelter since universities closed due to the protests.

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Bujumbura University Students 04
Bujumbura
By Alex Pritz
08 May 2015

Students listen to updates on the day's protests from radios in a stairwell of the abandoned building they use for safety and shelter adjacent the US embassy in Bujumbura.

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Bujumbura University Students 05
Bujumbura
By Alex Pritz
08 May 2015

Physics students study their lessons despite classes being cancelled due to the protests currently rocking Bujumbura.

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Bujumbura University Students 06
Bujumbura
By Alex Pritz
08 May 2015

A student glances out the window of the empty building they use for shelter adjacent the US embassy in Bujumbura. Students have been on the streets for over a week, since universities were closed May 1st 2015.

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Bujumbura University Students 07
Bujumbura
By Alex Pritz
08 May 2015

Students avoid the rain in an abandoned building next to the US embassy in Bujumbura. Approximately 500 students have been camped out outside the US embassy since universities closed May 1st 2015.

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Bujumbura University Students 08
Bujumbura
By Alex Pritz
08 May 2015

Students check their phone while avoiding the rain in a half built building adjacent the US embassy in Bujumbura.

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Bujumbura University Students 09
Bujumbura
By Alex Pritz
08 May 2015

A young man sleeps in the hallway of the half built building adjacent the US embassy that students are using for shelter since their schools closed their gates May 1st 2015.

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Bujumbura University Students 10
Bujumbura
By Alex Pritz
08 May 2015

The view of the US embassy from the half-constructed building students are using for shelter in Bujumbura since universities closed May 1st 2015.

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Bujumbura University Students 11
Bujumbura
By Alex Pritz
08 May 2015

The entrance to the half built building students are using for shelter in Bujumbura.

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Protesters Defy Pro-Houthi Security F...
Ibb
By Wahib Mashrah
08 Apr 2015

Ibb Province, Yemen
April 8, 2015

Scores of anti-Houthi protesters rallied in various cities of the central Yemeni province of Ibb in support of the Saudi-led operation Decisive Storm, despite the heavy presence of pro-Houthi security province. Video shows demonstrations in various locations and interviews with two protesters who voice their defiance of the Houthis.
Banners signed by the anti-Houthi Refusal Movement carried the inscription: “Ibb is not a prison. Freedom for the kidnapped.” Other banners that surfaced in one of the demonstrations featured the portraits of several people along with the inscription: “Freedom for the kidnapped by the head of security and Houthi militias.”
Other protestors also chanted: “We shall sacrifice our souls and blood for you, Aden,” while carrying banners that read: “Aden is the city of peace; do not kill it.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed anti-Houthi Protester

“Political activists have not been able to do anything. We will stand against them, even if they bomb us with chemical weapons. We will resist both Ali Abdulllah Saleh and the infidel Houthis.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed anti-Houthi Protester

“Interviewer: What is your message to those who have been kidnapped by the Houthis? “Protester: Our message is that they [Houthis] will not be able to do anything. They [the kidnapped] shall be freed. You are heroes.”

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Houthis Fire Upon Protestors in Taiz
Taiz
By Muatasm Mansor Al-Hitari
22 Mar 2015

March 23, 2015
Taiz, Yemen

In this video, Sunni protestors demonstrate against the Houthi takeover of Taiz in front of the "Special Security Forces" building where Houthis rebels stationed their reinforcements.

The protestors burn tires while militants loyal to the Houthis respond with live ammunition in central Taiz.

According to eyewitnesses, Houthi rebels have transported militiamen from Sana'a to Taiz to reinforce local security forces already under their control.

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Ukraine Marks Anniversary Of Maidan M...
Kiev
By Arturas Morozovas
21 Feb 2015

Commemorations in Kiev to honor the victims of deadly clashes between anti-government protesters and security forces a year ago. The violence killed more than 100 people, including 17 security officers, between February 18 and 21, 2014.

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Ukraine Marks Anniversary Of Maidan M...
Kiev, Ukraine
By Arturas Morozovas
21 Feb 2015

Commemorations in Kiev to honor the victims of deadly clashes between antigovernment protesters and security forces a year ago. The violence killed more than 100 people, including 17 security officers, between February 18 and 21, 2014.

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From Maidan to Donbass: '10 Days in F...
Sumy, Ukraine
By lordcob
26 Jan 2015

Text by : Johannes Sporrer

Italian photographer Jacob Balzani Lööv followed a self-defense unit in Kiev's Maidan for ten days up to the bloody events of 20 February 2014. He recently visited one of the protagonist of the revolutionary current that swept Ukraine at that time.

"I was in Kiev to meet some friends," says Balzani Lööv, who at the end of November 2013, found himself suddenly in the middle of Independence Square in Kiev. "I was surprised by how peaceful, determined and full of hope the protest was throughout the month of December, but that changed with time. People started to wear masks and to protect Maidan with clubs and shields, upgrading their defense to the violence of the police."

On the 10th of February 2014 during a protest to demand the release of some arrested activists, Balzani Lööv saw a masked, red-haired young woman and organized to meet her. Olesja Goriaynova, a then 19-years-old, was a journalism student from Sumy.

"I wanted to know if the attitude I loved in December in Maidan was still there," he recalls, "and Olesja told me that it was still there, but under wraps in the compounds where the defense units were living." After few days the photographer was granted access to the group, the 14 Sotnia.

These so-called self-defense units of the Maidan were founded to protect unarmed protesters from the increasing violence of the police.

"The central demand of the group was an independent Ukraine, without Yanukovych," says Balzani Lööv, "and a Ukraine without corruption, leaning towards Europe. Often its members were upset by the fact that newspapers were discussing only the geopolitical interests of the US and Russia, as if the Ukrainians had no say." He felt that the atmosphere in these days was tense. "It seemed quite possible that the police could have broke into the headquarters of the 14th Sotnias anytime and commit a massacre," he said.

To protect the group, Balzani Lööv promised that he would publish pictures showing unmasked members of the defense units only if the revolution would succeed or if there were to no longer be any threat.

Now, a year later, the immediate threat is over for the activists, but whether or not their revolution was actually successful, however, is far less clear. Balzani Lööv has met again with the activist Olesja Goryainova to ask her about the consequences of the protests. Olesja has moved back to her hometown, Sumy, some 300 kilometers east of Kiev. She is studying again, but she cannot fully return to her old life.

"Olesja now collects money and materials for the fighters in the anti-terrorist operation in eastern Ukraine," says Balzani Lööv. She is also a member of the Young Nationalist Congress, an organization that aims to strengthen the "patriotic spirit" of the youth. Olesja doesn't regret the Maidan.

"We just couldn't go on living that way," she says, though with a hint of disappointment in her voice.

Yanukovych is gone, but the reforms desired by the Maidan protestors did not materialize. As before, there is a lot of corruption in the country, and the war in the East has overshadowed the original goals of the young revolutionaries. The profound changes they sought for, postponed.

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Protest and clashes in bahrain
Bilad Qadeem
By MazenMahdi
16 Jan 2015

16 January, 2015
Bahrain, Manama

This video was shot on Friday 16 January 2015 in al-Bilad al-Kadim and shows the continuing demonstrations demanding the release of The shiite Sheikh Ali Salman, and the conflicts with the police that happen daily. The police use tear gas, tanks, law suits, and imprisoning to suppress these demonstrations.

Anti government demonstrations in Bahrain started in February 2011, influenced by the wave of uprisings in the Arab world at the beginning of 2011.

The demonstrations were led by the opposition in Bahrain, who demanded political, economic, and social adjustments.

Bahraini police suppressed the demonstrations in the central al-Loaloa square, which caused the people to move their protest to their villages demanding freedom.

In every demonstration in Bahrain, the people come into conflict with the police who fire tear gas and bullets into the crowd, resulting in injury or death.

In 28 December 2014, Sheikh Ali Salman was taken prisoner, he is the general-secretary in The Shia al-Wifak opposition organization. From that day the demonstrations have not stopped all over Bahrain. al-Bilad al-Kadim, Sheikh Ali Salman's home neighborhood, is the center of demonstrations in the capital of Manama.

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Peshawar Demonstrators in Solidarity ...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
13 Jan 2015

A group of Sunni clerics protested today in Peshawar, Pakistan against the Charlie Hebdo magazine and praised the two brothers who killed 11 of its employees and a police officer on 7 January in Paris. They also held a prayer ceremony for the killers and praised the attackers' actions, saying Said and Cherif Kouachi delivered justice against the cartoonists who disrespected the Holy Prophet Muhammad. The clerics made a clear distinction between the recent Taliban attack on the Peshawar Army School, which they wholly condemned, and this latest attack saying that the gunmen in Paris were justified in their killings because of the blasphemy committed by Charlie Hebdo.

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Weapons of Mass Obstruction - Hong Ko...
Hong Kong
By Gordon Arthur
30 Sep 2014

Hong Kong (01 October 2014) — Together, they resemble a Spartan phalanx. Every self-respecting protestor carries this weapon – usually concealed in a backpack or handbag – and he or she would not contemplate leaving home without it. It has been the weapon of choice for Hong Kong protestors calling for the democratic right of universal suffrage. Indeed, even sightseers with tunnel vision strolling through any of the several protest zones in Hong Kong would see this weapon in abundance. Arms dealers, generally in the guise of student activist groups, are blatantly hawking these instruments to all.

What is perhaps even more remarkable is that these weapons are being given away to normally peace-loving Hong Kong citizens free of charge. It has become a powerful and popular symbol representing the protest movement that has swept through Hong Kong, a Special Administrative Region of China. The umbrella.

A humble artifact has become a potent weapon of mass obstruction in the streets of Hong Kong.

On 28 September, as thousands of disgruntled citizens took to the streets, protestors armed with umbrellas were out in full force. Umbrellas were swiftly put to good use as members of the Hong Kong Police wearing full riot gear and lining barricades surrounding the government headquarters in the city’s Admiralty district fired streams of pepper spray at a restless crowd. Even those not directly in the firing line unfurled their umbrellas just in case.

These simple but effective devices certainly proved their worth in this first round of clashes. Protestors took shelter behind their dome-shaped canopies and efficiently shielded themselves from the capsicum jets. Realizing just how potent these defensive weapons actually were, police officers made it their business to tear umbrellas from protestors’ hands, rendering them defenseless. Indeed, the police had soon amassed an impressive mound of damaged and mangled umbrellas. Cracked ribs, pierced canopies and bent shafts were spotted in several umbrella graveyards just behind the police line.

However, every weapon has its limitations. Even deftly wielded umbrellas proved no match for the volleys of teargas canisters fired by police that night. Instead, protestors resorted to other defensive weapons in their arsenals to combat the acrid and debilitating smoke – goggles, face-masks and cling-film.

Since that fateful first day, protestors have professed ongoing infatuation with their umbrellas, causing some to name this the “Umbrella Movement” or the “Umbrella Revolution.” As peace and calm returned to the occupied streets of Hong Kong, umbrellas were used to fend off the hot sun as protestors settled in for a long day of civil disobedience. On the last night of September, umbrellas also served admirably as thunderstorms and heavy rain lashed Hong Kong. The umbrella again proved its weight in aluminum and fabric as demonstrators sheltered themselves from the weather.

The pro-democracy sit-ins have taken on an almost carnival-like atmosphere. Thousands are content to sit in clusters on once busy roads, avenues upon which expensive European luxury cars belonging to tycoons normally rush between urgent appointments and lucrative deals. Now there are numerous stalls offering free water, free food and free umbrellas to all. As one student volunteer explained, the arrays of umbrellas of all sizes and colors were available to all, and they had all been donated anonymously.

The usual Chinese entrepreneurial spirit has been surpassed by an overwhelming sense of bonhomie and friendship. In fact, there is not one money-making stall to be found at the protest sites. Instead, students help people to clamber over roadblocks, while others spray cooling water on passers by. There is a genuine sense of purpose and friendship.

Ravin Wu and a group of friends started a roadside exhibition where people can express their feelings about the protests by writing messages on old squares of cardboard. By mid-afternoon of the first day, several hundred sympathizers had already laid out messages on the asphalt. On many of the messages were images of umbrellas. Ravin agreed that the umbrella is an apt icon. “It helps protect us,” he acknowledged.

Another remarkable thing about the protests is the environmental concern being displayed. There has been no wanton looting and sacking in this city. Rather, teams of young people go around and pick up rubbish before taking it back to a collection point for recycling. By the end of the third day, the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Association (HKEPA) had collected 100,000 plastic bottles for recycling.

Ricky Fan, the HKEPA’s chairman, revealed his non-governmental organization also recycles umbrellas. He disclosed some statistics that portray just how valuable the umbrella has been. However, these figures also reveal the lifespan of an umbrella is remarkably short. On the opening day, when police confronted demonstrators, some 1,600 battle-damaged umbrellas were collected for recycling. On day two there were 650, as remnants were cleared from the protest site. There were still 410 salvaged on the peaceful third day. Clearly, umbrellas are still being put to heavy use, even if not in confrontation.

Fan explained that aluminum parts of umbrellas will be recycled, while other components such as the canopies will be used by students for artwork and other such evocative uses. The trusty umbrella, this icon of the Hong Kong pro-democracy movement, has acquitted itself well so far.

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Houthis Beef Up Security for Funeral ...
Amran
By Yousef
16 Sep 2014

September 16, 2014
Amran, Yemen

Shia-Houthis buried seven of their followers who were killed in three explosions in the Houthi-run central province of Amran. The Houthis were forced to beef up security during the burial procession in fear of more explosions going off nearby. Family members of those killed say they will continue to sacrifice the lives of their loved ones until the Yemeni government steps down from power and there is a reinstatement of fuel subsidies. Houthis blame Yemen’s main opposition al-Islah party for the explosions that killed the seven protesters. The central province of Amran has been under the control of the Shia-Houthis since July after they defeated the tribal and army forces who were loyal to the government.

Transcription:

Sound Bite 1:

"We are out today, to burry the martyrs who were killed by the traitors who do not fear God. We ask them, "Who are you working for? Why are you doing those things? For the sake of whom are you committing these crimes? You have no ethics, no principles, and no conscience"."

Sound Bite 2:

"We address our message to ISIS, America, and Israel, and we tell them that all the explosives they are planting in the streets, and the attacks they are doing, do not scare us. We will keep going, our revolution comes from the revolution of al-Hussein. No amour of explosions can scare us, we will dedicate dozens of martyrs for the cause of our revolution and until justice is served".

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Yemeni Houthis Intensify Anti-Governm...
Sana'a
By Yousef Mawry
29 Aug 2014

Sanaa, Yemen
August 29, 2014

Tens of thousands of Yemeni followers of the Shia'a Houthi group, massed in the country's capital Sana'a in a protest calling for the government to reverse a decision on cutting fuel subsidies and resign. The rally is part of an ongoing demonstration that has been going on for over a week and is growing in size. The Houthis are a powerful force in Yemen and have been fighting for years for more representation for their Shia'a sect in the northern part of the majority Sunni nation.

SOUNDBITE : Yemeni Protester (Man, Arabic, 25 sec) 'We are protesting against the government's decision to lift subsidies on oil derivatives, and making it harder to the people to buy petroleum products. We will remain protesting peacefully until our demands are fulfilled, and they will be achieved with God's will (Inchallah)'

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Yemen's Houthis Reignite Calls For Do...
By Yousef Mawry
27 Aug 2014

Sanaa, Yemen
August 27, 2014

Hundreds of thousands of Yemenis once again took to the street of Sana’a to call on the Yemeni government to meet their demands or else they will be forced to upscale anti-government revolutionary activities inside Sana’a in the coming days.

The mass rally comes after the Houthi leader called on his supporter and the Yemeni people to continue the second phase of their peaceful revolution until the government bows to their demands.

Abdullah Abd al-Rahman (protester) These people are coming out in the millions to call for the downfall of this corrupt government and the implementation of the outcomes of the national dialogue conference and to reconsider the lifting of fuel subsidies. The first phase to reach these goals is to assemble peaceful sit-ins on the outskirts of the capital Sana’a. The second phase is to stage massive demonstrations in the streets of Sana’a. The Houth’s leader said yesterday we shall advance into the third phase of the revolution, if the corrupt government does not meet the demands of the Yemeni people.

Umm Isah (Protester) “We came out the women of Sana’a to support our men in this revolution. This is the true revolution against the deadly price hikes and the government. What will the future hold for us and our children? Everyone is in misery because of this inflation, even the fetus in his mother’s stomach is effected by this. I tell president Hadi that he must step now down; we will achieve our demands no matter what they do.

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World Cup Legacy in Porto Alegre
Porto Alegre, Brazil
By Roberta Scherer
09 Jul 2014

Even close to its end, the World Cup still impacts the Brazilian people. The removals that happened for the construction of stadiums, enlargement of roads and airports are still a subject of discussion. A lot of Brazilians are still affected by the measures taken for the realization of the event.
Many popular movements united and founded the World Cup popular committees. These comities intend to promote discussion and a bigger involvement on subjects related to urban renovations, exploitation of labor and temporary measures related to the competition. Cláudia Fávaro, one of the founders of the Committee in Porto Alegre, says that the biggest concern about the removals is that, according to her, they are being held improperly.
A typical case is that of the inhabitants of the Vila Dique, close to Salgado Filho International Airport, in Porto Alegre. Part of the community was removed for the enlargement of the airstrip. A significant part of the dwellers are collectors of recycled material and the new homes they were offered are in apartments in a building, making their task harder. However, the biggest problem is related to the structure of the new residences, because they do not have enough public infrastructures to shelter 1.4 thousand families. According to the inhabitants, they do not have health centers or schools to put their children. All the public infrastructure has currently been transferred and the population that still lives in Vila Dique is completely unassisted, feeling obligated to move.
Despite the removals, the renovations planned to enlarge the runway have not been finished. According to Cláudia Favaro, a study made after the removals says that the ground is a wetland, making it impossible to build the runway.

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No Surrender: Impoverished Minority B...
Turkey
By Arianna Pagani
26 May 2014

Istanbul, Turkey 

May 26, 2014

 

On 22 May 2014, 34-year-old Alevi-Turkish protester Ugur Kurt, cleaner and father of one, was killed by Turkish police. He was shot in the head by a stray bullet as the police dispersed a group of demonstrators expressing their grief over the Soma mining distaster that had taken the lives of 301 miners on 13 May 2014. The demonstrators were also protesting the shooting death of 15-year-old Berkin Elvan, killed by a police-fired gas canister during protests in March of that year. Kurt, for his part, was killed outside an Alevi worship sight in the impoverished neighborhood of Okmaydani in Istanbul. 

Following these events, the Chepesi Party, an unrecognized political party comprised mostly of young people, clashed with the police. Members of the party shouted "Katil" (Criminals) at authorities. On the morning of 23 May, a police bus was hit by a Molotov cocktail, causing panic among policemen and leading one of them to fire in the air to disperse protesters. As the day continued, clashes in the neighborhood continued. By nightfall, protesters were taking aim at security cameras. More than 38 were arrested during the night of 26 May.

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Tens of thousands march for free educ...
Santiago, Chile
By Zachary F. Volkert
08 May 2014

Not just universities, not just public institutions, not even just grade school – Chile’s student movement demanding state-funded education at all levels marched against inaction from Pres. Michelle Bachelet this Thursday in Chile.

Official replace reports stated that 20 local police were wounded, three by molotov cocktails. Organizers, collected from every level of education, estimated 100,000 marched in Santiago alone, with police estimating around 40,000. More than 100 were detained by police.

Leaders of the student movement expressed renewed doubt that the president will fulfill her promises to meet the call for free education that it has called for since 2011, including University of Chile student federation FECH president, Melissa Sepúlveda.

“[Bachelet] has left it very unclear as to what reforms exactly will be made to the education system,” Sepúlveda said. “And today there are clear signals from the ministry of education that schools will continue to be a market.”

Funding to undertake the project of nationalizing all of Chile’s public and private schools in order to combat inequality has been one of the biggest obstacles in meeting the movement’s demands. Tomas Leighton, spokesperson of high school student movement Cones, reiterated the use of natural resources and tax reform as the best ways to achieve free education.

“The money needs to come from a tax reform,” Leighton said. “Chile is a mining country with a lot of copper that is going to multinational companies, that are also arriving here to flood citizens with malls and shopping centers.”

Past leaders of the student movement who are now in Congress left work for the day in Valparaíso to join in the protest movement, including Karol Cariola, Giorgio Jackson and Camilla Vallejo.

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Tens of thousands march...#4
By Zachary F. Volkert
08 May 2014

Water trucks and tear gas began flying from police forces relatively soon after the protests culminated in the plaza. Police rush to detain encapuchados - young, hooded protesters - throwing rocks at them.