Thumb sm
Dougga ruins
Dougga, Tunisia
By Sarah Mersch
13 Jul 2013

Roman arch at the historical site of Dougga, Tunisia

Thumb sm
Islamist Extremists Clash With Police...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Wassim Ben Rhouma
20 May 2013

Policeman control the streets of Tunis during Extremist islamist demonstration.

Thumb sm
Islamist Extremists Clash With Police...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Wassim Ben Rhouma
19 May 2013

Extremist Islamist demonstrators use Molotov cocktails during clashes with the police in Tunis.

Thumb sm
Islamist Extremists Clash With Police...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Wassim Ben Rhouma
19 May 2013

Islamic Extremist Organisation members clash with police in the Capitol Tunis.

Thumb sm
Islamist Extremists Clash With Police...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Wassim Ben Rhouma
19 May 2013

Extremist Islamist demonstrators use Molotov Cocktails during clashes with the police in Tunis.

Thumb sm
Islamist Extremists Clash With Police...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Wassim Ben Rhouma
18 May 2013

A journalist covers the demonstration as Islamic Extremist Organisation members clash with police in the Capital Tunis.

Thumb sm
Islamist Extremists Clash With Police...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Wassim Ben Rhouma
18 May 2013

The Islamic Extremist Organization "Ansar Sharia" members demonstrate in the Capitol Tunis.

Thumb sm
Islamist Extremists Clash With Police...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Wassim Ben Rhouma
18 May 2013

Islamic Extremist Organisation members demonstrate in the Capitol Tunis.

Frame 0004
Tunisia's Tourism Sector Looks for Al...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Mohamed Haddad
14 May 2013

A Video Report Done By: Sarah Mersch & Mohamed Haddad

Tunisia has long been a favorite destination for Western tourists. Since the revolution, prices went down, but so did the number of visitors - a disaster for the vital sector of Tunisian economy. 400,000 of Tunisia’s 10.5 million inhabitants depend on tourism, which makes up seven percent of the country’s GDP. Despite this, tourism professionals are looking for alternatives, whether it be wellness, cultural or hiking trips.

This is an international version, voice over + original soundbites are on the left track, ambient sound on the right.

Sidi Bou Said, a picturesque village over the hills of Tunis. Once a must for every visitor of the country, the small town is feeling the decline in tourism since the political turnover.

Mohamed Ben Ameur still opens his little souvenir stall every day, but the craftsman struggles to make a living.

SOUNDBITE Mohamed Ben Ameur, craftsman [ar]

There is nobody. Look, it’s Saturday and it’s empty. As soon as the big cruise ships leave, the street gets empty again. That’s what the minister said as well, there are less reservations than last year.

Half a million Tunisians and almost 10% of national income depend directly on tourism. Since the revolution, reservations have gone down by almost 15%.

Hammamet, an hour south of Tunis. It once used to be the hotspot of beach tourism, but the Europeans looking for cheap sun have gone elsewhere. Even though a week of all inclusive sells at 200 Euros.

Many of the three and four star hotels haven’t been renovated in a long time and struggle to keep the standard up. A third of the establishments should close for the sector to rejuvenate, professionals tell us off the record.

For the 4 star hotel Le Sultan, the situation is difficult, but the manager Mehdi Allani tries to keep up a good service. 120 employees are taking care of one hundred clients. An investment for a better future the owner still believes in. Mehdi Allani wants the restaurant setting to be top notch, even though yesterday, only twenty people ate here.

SOUNDBITE Mehdi Allani, Vice-President, Le Sultan hotel [fr]

Today, we are living a crisis. The priority should be reactivity. But this means being very fast. But we still function slowly, we’re in the phase of ‘Ah, we don’t have the money. We should... or maybe not...’. rather than acting quickly. [...] Our competitors are very reactive. If we want to compete on eye level, we need a lot of communication, a lot of events and most of all, reactivity. We need to be hyper-creative and hyper-fast.

After the revolution, Tunisia’s authorities have realized that its prior focus on cheap beach tourism is long outdated and especially vulnerable to political instability.

But the sector is still waiting for concrete initiatives by the authorities, Mehdi Allani says. He voluntarily works in a group of officials and tourism professionals to improve the situation of the industry and promote new concepts.

SOUNDBITE Mehdi Allani, Vice President, Le Sultan hotel [fr]

If we speak about the fact that there was a revolution, it happened in Tunisia, but not at the Tunisian Tourism Office, nor at the ministry. They still need to work on changing the habits, being creative.

Allani wants to go ahead and give a good example. Next to the Sultan, he’s constructing a second, even fancier hotel. Looking for alternatives, some hotel owners are increasingly focusing on golf and spa tourists, a rich clientele that is willing to pay for good service.

At the Hasdrubal, one of the few 5 star hotels in the region, the situation is very much the same as at the rest of Hammamet. Less than 20% of the capacity of this hotel with more than 400 beds is used in late May. But the Hasdrubal features something special:

SOUNDBITE Talha Husseini, General Director, Hasdrubal Thalassa hotel [fr]

This presidential suite is the biggest of the world. It measures 1540 m², features an interior and an exterior swimming pool, five sleeping rooms,....

The Salambo suite, where stars, starlets and politicians once came and gone has been deserted since the political turnover. The hotel opens it up only for TV crews. Nobody sleeps here anymore for 5000 Euros a night, neither Bashar Al Assad, nor Algerian president Bouteflika or Mariah Carey. Talha Husseini is in a hurry to quickly lead us through the suite. Other clients are to arrive soon - at the normal hotel, which has become the Hasdrubal’s main business.

SOUNDBITE Talha Husseini, General Director, Hasdrubal Thalassa hotel [fr]

The kind of clients that use the presidential suite are really part of the upper class. And they prefer not to come as long as the political situation in Tunisia is not really stable. Honestly speaking, 2011 and 2012 weren’t great.

The days of glory of the Hasdrubal have passed. The suite is mentioned in the Guinness book as the biggest of the world. Even though the award features big on the website, it fails to attract the clients the hotel once had.

SOUNDBITE Talha Husseini, General Director, Hasdrubal Thalassa hotel [fr]

When the owner of the hotel was building it, everybody told him that he was crazy. There were no clients for this kind of luxury tourism in Tunisia at the time. So he had to develop the clientele.

The director remains silent about the exact number of guests currently visiting the hotel. Most have been shied away by bad press and security concerns. The few who come enjoy the calm and empty beaches.
This british tourist is on his first visit to Tunisia. He appreciates the increased security measures

SOUNDBITE British tourist [en]

This morning, there were policemen going along the beach in buggies. There is always a risk, wherever you go in the world. I think the Tunisian government has seen that there is an interest and a need to address any concerns and they have dealt with that.

As the Hasdrubal once brought a new category of visitors to Tunisia, tourism professionals today try to develop another new clientele. The Northern region of Kef, once the wheat chamber of the Romans: tourists
have always been a rare sight here. Today, there are even less than before the revolution. But the population tries to promote local initiatives and to attract new clients. A cave serves local painter Ammar Belghit as a workshop. It could be one stop on a tour that takes visitors around the region, from hot springs to Roman ruins and the historical city of Kef. For Ahmed Trabelsi, the revolution was a blessing.

SOUNDBITE Ahmed Trabelsi, [exact function / association]

We are a lot more flexible. There’s no police car anymore following us around to see who these people are and what they are doing at Ammar’s grotto.

Before the revolution, to organise even a small hiking tour with a group of foreigners, guides needed almost a dozen permits from local and national authorities. Now they are free to show the treasuries of a country with rich history, which has a lot more to offer than just beaches.

Conscious that alternative tourism will not save the whole industry, the locals hope to at least attract a customer base which is less vulnerable to political hiccups.

In the meantime, the beaches are awaiting another quiet summer.

Thumb sm
Tunisian Military Helicopter Crash (4...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Wassim Ben Rhouma
06 Apr 2013

A military helicopter crashed in the capitol Tunis, near the military airport Aouina, caused by a technical problem. The staff onboard included five Tunisian officers and are all safe.

Thumb sm
Tunisian Military Helicopter Crash (3...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Wassim Ben Rhouma
06 Apr 2013

A military helicopter crashed in the capitol Tunis, near the military airport Aouina, caused by a technical problem. The staff onboard included five Tunisian officers and are all safe.

Thumb sm
Tunisian Military Helicopter Crash (2...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Wassim Ben Rhouma
06 Apr 2013

A military helicopter crashed in the capitol Tunis, near the military airport Aouina, caused by a technical problem. The staff onboard included five Tunisian officers and are all safe.

Thumb sm
Tunisian Military Helicopter Crash (1...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Wassim Ben Rhouma
06 Apr 2013

A military helicopter crashed in the capitol Tunis, near the military airport Aouina, caused by a technical problem. The staff onboard included five Tunisian officers and are all safe.

Frame 0004
Port memory of GHAR EL MALAH ..A comb...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Zaid Abbour
02 Apr 2013

Its history witnessed the Othman and Spanish conflict in the old Port or “EL KASHLA” as the habitants of Ghar El Malah called it.
Porto farina is its old name with reference to the Admiral “Farina” whose its armies swept the city in 1534 during the reign of the Spanish Emperor “Charles Kan”.
Several strikes erupted there between the Admiral armies and the Ottomans ended with the victory of the Dayas in 1618, many forts have been built then, when they first called for the navy strikes.
Three forts and shipbuilding were designed by an architect called MOSA EL ANDOULSY EL GHARNATY during the reign of “EL DAYA Morud Osta” in the last three decades of the seventieth century which were transformed into a military base that succeeded to repulse the enemies’ attack and protect the Tunisian Eyala.
The Port is situated in the banks of a lake, linked to the sea and a canal near the estuary of OUED MAJARDA which was faced to the sand and mud, it results a decreasing in terms of its depth and a severe economic setback.
Moreover, Ahmed Bay realized the value of this place and in 1837, he ordered to bridge the Canal and to build stores for weapons and ammunitions and he provided them with necessary finance.
Ghar El Malah was transformed again into a military base with a sophisticated Navy Port composed of more than 10 thousands. And from this Port, Ahmad Bay and Ahmed Ibn Aby Dhayef sailed to France on November, 5th, 1846.
After his death, the Canal was messed out of lack of maintenance, those installations were ruined, and the fleet was converted to the Port of “la Goulette”.
Today, EL KASHLA is seen as an anchorage for the small fishing boats representing the livelihood of dozens of families in the city.
In this place, images met with words and commemorate the history of our civilization.
The Mediterranean breeze is mixed with a nice fragrant of their glory.

Frame 0004
Poisonous Bullets
Tunisia
By ayanken
02 Mar 2013

A video reporting covering the event in Tunisia.

Thumb sm
Tunisia: the guardians of the saints 05
By Steven Wassenaar
14 Feb 2013

The temple of patron saint Sidi Mehrez in the center of Tunis is guarded, maintained and visited by women. 79 year-old Khira (left), who has been guarding the temple for 50 years, gives holy water to a faithful. The well in the mausoleum is blessed. to complete the "ziara" (the visit), the faithfuls have to drink its water. On the right, next to the door, is Zora. The mausoleum is protected by the police. Since the fall of Ben Ali's regime in 2011, attacks against mausoleums and Sufi places of worship by radical Islamists are frequent. Islamists consider prayers to saints a sin because it associates other gods or beings with Allah. Since 2011, 80 mausoleums, mainly guarded by women, have been attacked.

Le temple de Sidi Mehrez à Tunis. A gauche, Khira, 79 ans, gardienne du temple de Sidi Mehrez depuis 50 ans. A droite de la porte : Zora. Le mausolé est protégé par la police : depuis la chute de Ben Ali en 2011 les attaques contre les mausolées et les lieux de culte des confréries soufies, très nombreux en Tunisie, sont l'œuvre de l’islam rigoriste: la prière des saints est une hérésie à leurs yeux (les djihadistes d'Ansar Dine ont par le même raisonnement saccagés les mausolées à Tombouctou, au Mali. ). Depuis 2011, 80 Mausolée - le plus souvent tenus par des femmes - ont été attaqués en Tunisie.

Thumb sm
Chenini mosque
Chenini, Tunisia
By Sarah Mersch
23 Nov 2012

Mosque in the Southern town of Chenini (near Tataouine)

Thumb sm
Ksar in Southern Tunisia
Tataouine, Tunisia
By Sarah Mersch
23 Nov 2012

Ruins of a Ksar (traditional housing) in Southern Tunisia near Tataouine

Thumb sm
THEFT AT THE AMERICAN SCHOOL IN TUNIS...
Tunisia Tunis
By Beirut Editor's Picks
14 Sep 2012

People stealing furniture and laptops from the American school in Tunis, after the school was set on fire following the release of an American anti-Islam movie.

Thumb sm
Tunisia: teachers are rising up to de...
Tunisia
By jamel
12 Sep 2012

After the Tunisian Minister of Education Abdul Latif Obaid deducted 100 dinars (63$) from the wages of junior high school teachers who protested in May, the General Union of Tunisian Workers organized a demonstration with many of the teachers and trade unionists from different parts of the Republic.

Thumb sm
Tunisia: teachers are rising up to de...
Tunisia
By jamel
12 Sep 2012

After the Tunisian Minister of Education Abdul Latif Obaid deducted 100 dinars (63$) from the wages of junior high school teachers who protested in May, the General Union of Tunisian Workers organized a demonstration with many of the teachers and trade unionists from different parts of the Republic.

Thumb sm
Tunisia: teachers are rising up to de...
Tunisa
By jamel
12 Sep 2012

After the Tunisian Minister of Education Abdul Latif Obaid deducted 100 dinars (63$) from the wages of junior high school teachers who protested in May, the General Union of Tunisian Workers organized a demonstration with many of the teachers and trade unionists from different parts of the Republic.

Thumb sm
Tunisia: teachers are rising up to de...
Tunisia
By jamel
12 Sep 2012

After the Tunisian Minister of Education Abdul Latif Obaid deducted 100 dinars (63$) from the wages of junior high school teachers who protested in May, the General Union of Tunisian Workers organized a demonstration with many of the teachers and trade unionists from different parts of the Republic.

Thumb sm
Tunisia: teachers are rising up to de...
Tunisia
By Editor's Picks
11 Sep 2012

After the Tunisian Minister of Education Abdul Latif Obaid deducted 100 dinars (63$) from the wages of junior high school teachers who protested in May, the General Union of Tunisian Workers organized a demonstration with many of the teachers and trade unionists from different parts of the Republic.

Thumb sm
TUNISIA – A NEW VICTIM OF TORTURE
Jerissa, Tunisia
By jamel
11 Sep 2012

Tension, protests and confrontation with police in Jerrisa, northwest of Tunisia after the funeral of ABDERAOUF AL KHAMASSI.
Abderaouf was a 30 year old man. He was arrested on August 28th 2012 in Tunis in a larceny affair.
4 policemen charged of doing the investigation beat and tortured him until he lost consciousness. He was taken to the Hospital Charles Nicolas in Tunis where he died.
Abdreaouf Khammasi is not the only victim of police brutality after the revolution: last week
The human rights activist Radhia Nasraoui announced in an interview that a lady was arrested and then violated by 3 policemen while they were working; the ministry of interior confirms this fact and promises to try the perpetrators in a court of law.

Thumb sm
TUNISIA – A NEW VICTIM OF TORTURE
Jerissa, Tunisia
By jamel
11 Sep 2012

Tension, protests and confrontation with police in Jerissa, northwest of Tunisia after the funeral of ABDERAOUF AL KHAMASSI.
Abderaouf was a 30 year old man. He was arrested on August 28th 2012 in Tunis in a larceny affair.
4 policemen charged of doing the investigation beat and tortured him until he lost consciousness. He was taken to the Hospital Charles Nicolas in Tunis where he died.
Abdreaouf Khammasi is not the only victim of police brutality after the revolution: last week
The human rights activist Radhia Nasraoui announced in an interview that a lady was arrested and then violated by 3 policemen while they were working; the ministry of interior confirms this fact and promises to try the perpetrators in a court of law.

Thumb sm
TUNISIA – A NEW VICTIM OF TORTURE
Jerissa, Tunisia
By jamel
11 Sep 2012

Tension, protests and confrontation with police in Jerrisa, northwest of Tunisia after the funeral of ABDERAOUF AL KHAMASSI.
Abderaouf was a 30 year old man. He was arrested on August 28th 2012 in Tunis in a larceny affair.
4 policemen charged of doing the investigation beat and tortured him until he lost consciousness. He was taken to the Hospital Charles Nicolas in Tunis where he died.
Abdreaouf Khammasi is not the only victim of police brutality after the revolution: last week
The human rights activist Radhia Nasraoui announced in an interview that a lady was arrested and then violated by 3 policemen while they were working; the ministry of interior confirms this fact and promises to try the perpetrators in a court of law.

Thumb sm
TUNISIA – A NEW VICTIM OF TORTURE
Jerissa, Tunisia
By jamel
11 Sep 2012

Tension, protests and confrontation with police in Jerrisa, northwest of Tunisia after the funeral of ABDERAOUF AL KHAMASSI.
Abderaouf was a 30 year old man. He was arrested on August 28th 2012 in Tunis in a larceny affair.
4 policemen charged of doing the investigation beat and tortured him until he lost consciousness. He was taken to the Hospital Charles Nicolas in Tunis where he died.
Abdreaouf Khammasi is not the only victim of police brutality after the revolution: last week
The human rights activist Radhia Nasraoui announced in an interview that a lady was arrested and then violated by 3 policemen while they were working; the ministry of interior confirms this fact and promises to try the perpetrators in a court of law.

Thumb sm
TUNISIA – A NEW VICTIM OF TORTURE
Jerissa, Tunisia
By jamel
11 Sep 2012

Tension, protests and confrontation with police in Jerrisa, northwest of Tunisia after the funeral of ABDERAOUF AL KHAMASSI.
Abderaouf was a 30 year old man. He was arrested on August 28th 2012 in Tunis in a larceny affair.
4 policemen charged of doing the investigation beat and tortured him until he lost consciousness. He was taken to the Hospital Charles Nicolas in Tunis where he died.
Abdreaouf Khammasi is not the only victim of police brutality after the revolution: last week
The human rights activist Radhia Nasraoui announced in an interview that a lady was arrested and then violated by 3 policemen while they were working; the ministry of interior confirms this fact and promises to try the perpetrators in a court of law.

Thumb sm
TUNISIA – A NEW VICTIM OF TORTURE
Tunisia Jarissah
By Editor's Picks
10 Sep 2012

Tense, protests and confrontation with police in JERRISA, northwest of Tunisia after the funeral of ABDERAOUF AL KHAMASSI.
Abderaouf is a 30 years old youth. He was arrested on august 28th 2012 in Tunis in a larceny affair.
4 policemen charged by doing the investigation still beating him and torturing him till he lost the conscience.
So he was taken to the Hospital Charles Nicolas in Tunis where he died.
Abdreaouf Khammasi is not the only victims of police repression after the revolution: last week
The human rights activist Radhia Nasraoui announced in an interview that a lady was arrested and then violated by 3 policemen while they were working; the ministry of interior confirms this fact and promises to try the perpetrators in a court of law.

Thumb sm
Cani islands
Bizerte, Tunisia
By Sarah Mersch
19 Aug 2012

Sunset over the Cani islands in Northern Tunisia near Bizerte

Thumb sm
Cani islands
Bizerte, Tunisia
By Sarah Mersch
19 Aug 2012

Sunset over the Cani islands in Northern Tunisia near Bizerte

Thumb sm
Tunisian Youth attempt to Escape to I...
Sidi Bouzid, Tunisia
By jamel
14 Aug 2012

Tunisian Youth revolted on 12/17/2010 against the dictator ZINE EL ABIDINE BEN ALI and his
corrupt regime. Their slogan was: Jobs, freedom, dignity and the revolt begun in the poor forgotten
town Sidi Bouzid, after the 24 years old man Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire as a statement
against police repression.

The revolution succeeded as Ben ali left the country and escaped to Saudi Arabia.

3 transition governments succeed him and elections of a constitutional assembly took place on
October 23rd 2011.

The Islamic party ENNAHDHA won the elections and took power . They built a coalition
government with the 2 seculars parties ETTAKATOL and the CPR.

Tunisian people hope for reforms, prosperity and a better life.

But nothing changed: more jobless, more corruption and more repression.

On Thursday 9/5/2012 136 hopeless youth took a small boat and tried to escape illegally to Italy for a
better life, for a better future.

But they got lost in the Mediterranean. Only few were saved, but the others died or are still lost.

One of the dead youth was NADER BOUHOUCH, 23, from Sidi Bouzid, the birthplace of the Tunisian
revolution. Nader was also very active during the revolution and joined with his countrymen to
emancipate Tunisia from a regime that repressed the country for more than 23 years.

But the revolution didn’t t fulfill the dreams of NADER and the Tunisian Youth, the dream of
jobs, freedom and dignity.

Frame 0004
Morsi's First Weeks In Office
Cairo, Egypt
By Editor's Picks
02 Aug 2012

Since taking office on June 30, 2012, Morsi has met with officials from several nations including defense secretaries, foreign ministers, and presidents, discussing Egypt's post-revolution diplomatic relationships and current developments in the Middle East. This is a collection of videos from many of his meetings.

Frame 0004
President Morsi Meets with FMs of Oma...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
29 Jul 2012

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi held talks on Sunday, July 29, with Omani Foreign Minister Youssef Ben Allawi in Cairo, where they discussed restoring relations between Egypt and Oman.

During the meeting, which was attended by Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr, Ben Allawi conveyed a message from Sultan Qaboos Ben Saeed of Oman congratulating him on coming to office.

Ben Allawi told reporters after the meeting that the two countries intended huge investment projects and strong bilateral ties.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Omani Foreign Minister Youssef Ben Allawi:
“Mr. President talked about some of the new aspects of the projects intended by Egypt to resolve some issues, including leading projects with strategic dimension and huge economic and investment dimensions.”

On the other hand, Morsi held met with the Foreign Ministers of Tunisia and Libya, Ashour Ben Khayal and Rafiq Abdul Salam, where they discussed common issues related to post-revolution Egypt, Tunisia and Libya.

The meeting aimed at coordinating situations between the three countries in various issues and enhancing economic cooperation between them.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr:
“We have of course common concerns and issues, including border control, the security situation at the coast and desert areas between our countries, which is an unusual situation, in addition to the economic cooperation and integration and the financial aids intended by Western countries to the countries of the region, particularly those that have gone through revolutions.”

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Tunisian Foreign Minister Rafiq Abdul Salam:
“The Foreign Ministers of the three countries, Egypt, Libya and Tunisia, met together. Our conditions are similar and interrelated. There are geographic, cultural, historical and linguistic connections between us; they are deep-rooted connections. Based on these strong connections, we want to establish strong ties also, to exchange interests between our people in a way that serves the interests of the three countries as well as the interests of our Arab nations.”

They also discussed cancelling entry visas among the three countries and extend the experience, if successful, to include all Arab states.

For his part, Libyan Foreign Minister Ashour Ben Khayal said that the meeting gathered leaders representing countries after the three Arab revolutions, wishing that Syria would join the three countries.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: July 29, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: July 29, 2012
Length: 0:03:03
Video Size: 150 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Pan left, Egyptian Presidency headquarters in Cairo
2. Various shots of the meeting of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi and Omani Foreign Minister Youssef Ben Allawi, attended by Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr
3. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Omani Foreign Minister Youssef Ben Allawi:
“Mr. President talked about some of the new aspects of the projects intended by Egypt to resolve some issues, including very leading projects with strategic dimension and huge economic and investment dimensions.”
4. Various shots of the meeting of President Morsi and the Foreign Ministers of Tunisia and Libya
5. Pan left, FMs of Egypt, Tunisia and Libya heading to a press conference
6. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr:
“We have of course common concerns and issues, including the border control, the security situation at the coast and desert areas between our countries, which is an unusual situation, in addition to the economic cooperation and integration and the financial aids intended by Western countries to the countries of the region, particularly those that have gone through revolutions.” 7. SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Tunisian Foreign Minister Rafiq Abdul Salam:
“The Foreign Ministers of the three countries, Egypt, Libya and Tunisia, met together. Our conditions are similar and interrelated. There are geographic, cultural, historical and lingual connections between us; they are deep-rooted connections. Based on these strong connections, we want to establish strong ties also, to exchange interests between our peoples in a way that serves the interests three countries as well as the interests of our Arab nation.”
8. Zoom in, Libyan FM Ashour Ben Khayal speaking during the press conference
9. Various shots of the press conference
10. Pan right, the FMs leaving after the press conference
11. Wide shot, Egyptian Presidency headquarters in Cairo

Thumb sm
Drying laundry
Tunis,
By Sarah Mersch
26 Jul 2012

hang up on a window in the old city of Tunis

Frame 0004
Tunisian Gafsa Phosphate Company - Co...
Redeyef, Tunisia
By billcode
10 Jul 2012

Redeyef, is a small town located 350 km south of Tunis, in a region that holds Tunisia's phosphate resources.

In 2008, the Gafsa Phosphate Company open new jobs opportunities, which were given to supporters of then-president Ben Ali. This unfair situation resulted in months of protests, four deaths and numerous arrests.
Four years later and despite the fall of Ben Ali's regime youth in Redeyef are still facing unemployment and corruption at the state-owned Gafsa Phosphate Company.

Frame 0004
Tunisian minorities under pressure
Djerba, Tunisia
By billcode
22 May 2012

Since the revolution hit Tunisia in 2011, religious minorities have been watching with unease the growth in size and confidence of puritanical Islamist groups which were suppressed under the secular dictatorship.

Churches have been attacked, Jews shouted down and the followers of revered saints harassed into not attending the shrines they've always visited. In a country long proud of its secular tradition, they watch as shrines and churches have become almost fair game across North Africa.

As people here debate what it means to be a Tunisian, meet members of the small minority groups in this overwhelmingly Sunni Muslim country.

We meet a young man converting to Judaism from Sunni Islam, who tells us the hopes he has for his country, and his life, as he takes his risky journey.

We meet followers of the ancient Stambali group, descended from black African slaves, who tell of the harassment they are receiving on the basis that their reverence of saints is not acceptable in Islam.

The Association for the Support of Minorities - newly allowed, but not keen on allowing the same right to existence for Salafists and other ultraconservatives, wants action from the Islamist-led government to support minorities.

And get the view of the Tahrir party - long banned in many countries including Tunisia, but recently permitted by the Islamist-led government.

Talent:

'Mehdi', Muslim converting to Judaism

Riadh Zaouch, Stambali Shrine leader

Yamina Thabet, Association for the Support of Minorities

Ridha Bel Haj, Tahrir Party

Frame 0004
Ramadan for Tourists
Tunisia
By Ali.Jabeur
05 May 2012

A video report on the month of Ramadan in the from the perspective of tourists visiting Tunisia and the challenges they face in a high temperatures.