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Tunis Attack Aftermath 10
Tunis
By Mohamed Krit
18 Mar 2015

According to local reports 23 people, mostly foreign tourists, were killed while others remain in hospital when gunmen opened fire at the museum close to the Tunisian parliament 18 March. In response, Tunisian President has order the armed forces to deploy to cities throughout the country, vowing to crack down on militant activity.

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Tunis Attack Aftermath 07
Tunis
By Mohamed Krit
18 Mar 2015

According to local reports 23 people, mostly foreign tourists, were killed while others remain in hospital when gunmen opened fire at the museum close to the Tunisian parliament 18 March. In response, Tunisian President has order the armed forces to deploy to cities throughout the country, vowing to crack down on militant activity.

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Tunis Attack Aftermath 08
Tunis
By Mohamed Krit
18 Mar 2015

According to local reports 23 people, mostly foreign tourists, were killed while others remain in hospital when gunmen opened fire at the museum close to the Tunisian parliament 18 March. In response, Tunisian President has order the armed forces to deploy to cities throughout the country, vowing to crack down on militant activity.

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Tunis Attack Aftermath 09
Tunis
By Mohamed Krit
18 Mar 2015

According to local reports 23 people, mostly foreign tourists, were killed while others remain in hospital when gunmen opened fire at the museum close to the Tunisian parliament 18 March. In response, Tunisian President has order the armed forces to deploy to cities throughout the country, vowing to crack down on militant activity.

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Tunis Attack Aftermath 10
Tunis
By Mohamed Krit
18 Mar 2015

According to local reports 23 people, mostly foreign tourists, were killed while others remain in hospital when gunmen opened fire at the museum close to the Tunisian parliament 18 March. In response, Tunisian President has order the armed forces to deploy to cities throughout the country, vowing to crack down on militant activity.

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Tunis Attack Aftermath 11
Tunis
By Mohamed Krit
18 Mar 2015

According to local reports 23 people, mostly foreign tourists, were killed while others remain in hospital when gunmen opened fire at the museum close to the Tunisian parliament 18 March. In response, Tunisian President has order the armed forces to deploy to cities throughout the country, vowing to crack down on militant activity.

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Tunisia: Bardo Museum Attack Aftermath
Rue Ibn El Baytar, Sidi Thabet,Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
18 Mar 2015

March 18, 2015
Tunis, Tunisia

Police, Military, and emergency response teams scramble to rescue tourists and civilians who survived the attack on the Bardo National Museum in Tunis. Video includes shots of foreign tourists receiving medical treatment, foreign tourists boarding buses outside the museum, and general chaos as police and military secure the area.

Injured Tourist:

"No, no, I fell."

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The Visit 01
Tunis, Tunisia
By Zaid Abbour
20 Jan 2015

More than 100 Sufi worshipers and performers of Al-Rashidiya traditional music band gave an ecstatic show titled The Visit at the Tunisian capital’s municipal theater. The spiritual performance, which included traditional Sufi music and dancing, revolved around praising God, Prophet Mohammad and Sufi saints. The performance was directed by Sami Lajmi and featured artists Mohammad Dahlab, Haidar Amir and Munir al-Troudi al-Naat, as well as Sheikhs Mukhtar Bayyoud and Mahdi Abbas.

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The Visit 02
Tunis, Tunisia
By Zaid Abbour
20 Jan 2015

More than 100 Sufi worshipers and performers of Al-Rashidiya traditional music band gave an ecstatic show titled The Visit at the Tunisian capital’s municipal theater. The spiritual performance, which included traditional Sufi music and dancing, revolved around praising God, Prophet Mohammad and Sufi saints. The performance was directed by Sami Lajmi and featured artists Mohammad Dahlab, Haidar Amir and Munir al-Troudi al-Naat, as well as Sheikhs Mukhtar Bayyoud and Mahdi Abbas.

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The Visit 03
Tunis, Tunisia
By Zaid Abbour
20 Jan 2015

More than 100 Sufi worshipers and performers of Al-Rashidiya traditional music band gave an ecstatic show titled The Visit at the Tunisian capital’s municipal theater. The spiritual performance, which included traditional Sufi music and dancing, revolved around praising God, Prophet Mohammad and Sufi saints. The performance was directed by Sami Lajmi and featured artists Mohammad Dahlab, Haidar Amir and Munir al-Troudi al-Naat, as well as Sheikhs Mukhtar Bayyoud and Mahdi Abbas.

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The Visit 06
Tunis, Tunisia
By Zaid Abbour
20 Jan 2015

More than 100 Sufi worshipers and performers of Al-Rashidiya traditional music band gave an ecstatic show titled The Visit at the Tunisian capital’s municipal theater. The spiritual performance, which included traditional Sufi music and dancing, revolved around praising God, Prophet Mohammad and Sufi saints. The performance was directed by Sami Lajmi and featured artists Mohammad Dahlab, Haidar Amir and Munir al-Troudi al-Naat, as well as Sheikhs Mukhtar Bayyoud and Mahdi Abbas.

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The Visit 07
Tunis, Tunisia
By Zaid Abbour
20 Jan 2015

More than 100 Sufi worshipers and performers of Al-Rashidiya traditional music band gave an ecstatic show titled The Visit at the Tunisian capital’s municipal theater. The spiritual performance, which included traditional Sufi music and dancing, revolved around praising God, Prophet Mohammad and Sufi saints. The performance was directed by Sami Lajmi and featured artists Mohammad Dahlab, Haidar Amir and Munir al-Troudi al-Naat, as well as Sheikhs Mukhtar Bayyoud and Mahdi Abbas.

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The Visit 09
Tunis, Tunisia
By Zaid Abbour
20 Jan 2015

More than 100 Sufi worshipers and performers of Al-Rashidiya traditional music band gave an ecstatic show titled The Visit at the Tunisian capital’s municipal theater. The spiritual performance, which included traditional Sufi music and dancing, revolved around praising God, Prophet Mohammad and Sufi saints. The performance was directed by Sami Lajmi and featured artists Mohammad Dahlab, Haidar Amir and Munir al-Troudi al-Naat, as well as Sheikhs Mukhtar Bayyoud and Mahdi Abbas.

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2014 Presidential elections in Tunisia
Tunis
By Adeline Bailleul
24 Nov 2014

Raw footage of the polling stations in Tunis during Tunisia's first presidential election since a new constitution was adopted in January 2014.

With a voter turnout around 64 percent, this election marks the country's first democratic transition of power. Over 80,000 servicemen were deployed to ensure safety at polling stations, where voting went fairly smoothly throughout the day.

Beji Caid Essebsi of the secular Nida Tounes is expected to emerge on top, with Moncef Marzouki of the moderate Islamist Ennahda party following close behind. However, at the close of polling, no candidate seemed likely to have enough votes to win outright, in which case a run-off would take place in December.

Official results are expected to be released Wednesday.

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2014 Presidential elections in Tunisia
Tunis
By Adeline Bailleul
22 Nov 2014

Photos of the polling stations in Tunis during the 2014 presidential elections.

With a voter turnout around 64 percent, this election marks the country's first democratic transition of power. Over 80,000 servicemen were deployed to ensure safety at polling stations, where voting went fairly smoothly throughout the day.

Beji Caid Essebsi of the secular Nida Tounes is expected to emerge on top, with Moncef Marzouki of the moderate Islamist Ennahda party following close behind. However, at the close of polling, no candidate seemed likely to have enough votes to win outright, in which case a run-off would take place in December.

Official results are expected to be released Wednesday.

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Tunisian Elections 2014 : The Revolut...
Tunis
By Adeline Bailleul
29 Oct 2014

ROUGH CUT / INTERVIEWS + RUSHES

With whispers of revolutionary ideals still on the lips of its disenchanted youth, Tunisia went to the polls to elect its parliament on Sunday, October 26. Tunisia’s electoral body announced that the provisional turnout was 60 %. The final results are expected on Wednesday.

Beyond the massive gatherings of political parties and campaigns that have bombarded the streets, a large category of Tunisians chose to not participate in the elections.

Nabila, Sonia, Mohammed and Nadhim are all activists in Tunisia. They decided to boycott the elections even though they were among the first to call for democracy during the Tunisian uprising. They all called for a boycott on the elections to resist attempts by the political class to derail their revolution, to distract people from its real objectives and goals.

There are indeed a fair number of Tunisians equally disappointed with the country’s democratic transition. Among them are the families of the martyrs of the revolution who gathered on Avenue Bourguiba on October 22 to vocalize their discontent with a transitional justice process that, from their perspective, has been blocked by the whole of the political class.

For them, most of the issues that triggered the revolution remain: police impunity; unemployment; inequality; and the lack of justice, dignity and hope. They decided to fight against what they see as a the continuity of tyranny.

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Tunisia's Slim Riahi: from Football t...
Tunis
By Filippo Del Bubba
24 Oct 2014

No one in Tunisia knew about Slim Riahi when the Tunisian revolution started in 2010. Now the businessman, famous in Tunis for owning the city's beloved football club is making a splash in Tunisian politics as the country readies for its first democratic elections since adopting a new constitution in January 2014.
The aftermath of the Tunisian revolution against ex-president Ben Ali, offered Slim the opportunity to come back to his country of origin and to found a political party, the Free Patriotic Union (UPL); to acquire a 20-percent stake of Dar Assabah, the newspaper publisher; to create three TV stations including Ettounsiya Al-Oula, Ettounsiya Sport and Ettounsiya News; and to become the president of Club Africain, Tunisia’s oldest football club. Four years later, he is challenging the main political forces by becoming his newly founded party’s candidate for the presidency. On the eve of Tunisian elections the UPL is poised to become the third major party in the country, tipping the balance decisively between Ennhada and Nida Tounes.
The UPL platform is based on 10 points: above all, security and military enforcement; second, development and job opportunity through private investments, a general non secular vision of the power, a managerial approach to politics. The political campaign is based on the richness of Slim Riahi, as antidote to corruption: he doesn't need public money. His campaign has been based on the capillary presence in poor neighborhoods and the promise of work and economic help to
families and young unemployed citizens. During legislative elections, his party joined the third position (following Nidaa Tounes -86- and Ennhada -69-) and his 16 sieges in Tunisian parliament will make the difference in government's future composition.
How can football promote a political career? How can financial strategies build political credibility? Europeans remembers the Italian experience, where former president Berlusconi was the owner of Milan’s football club and of three of Italy’s most important television stations. Will “football to politics” work in Tunisia, a country still seeking a way forward after revolutions shook up the country’s old political order?
At the team’s fan headquarters in the Bab el Jedid neighborhood of Tunis, supporters of Tunis’ Club Africain football team speak their minds about the political potential of their beloved club’s owner.

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Tunisia: Slim Riahi's UPL Tips Balanc...
Tunis
By Filippo Del Bubba
24 Oct 2014

B-ROLL FROM UPL MEETING IN TUNIS' EZZAHOUR NEIGHBORHOOD

No one in Tunisia knew about Slim Riahi when the Tunisian revolution started in 2010. Four years later, he is challenging the main political forces by becoming his newly founded party’s candidate for the presidency.

Born in Efidha in 1972, he grew up in exile in Libya where he studied management and build up his economic empire in the oil production, energy, aviation and property development industries. He recently moved to London, where he held both Tunisian and British citizenship.

The aftermath of the Tunisian revolution against ex-president Ben Ali, offered Slim the opportunity to come back to his country of origin and to found a political party, the Free Patriotic Union (UPL); to acquire a 20-percent stake of Dar Assabah, the newspaper publisher; to create three TV stations including Ettounsiya Al-Oula, Ettounsiya Sport and Ettounsiya News; and to become the president of Club Africain, Tunisia’s oldest football club.

Now, on the eve of Tunisian elections, he is in the running for President of the Republic as his party, UPL, is poised to become the third major party in the country, tipping the balance decisively between Ennhada and Nida Tounes.
The UPL platform is based on 10 points: first and foremost, security and military enforcement; second, development and creative employment through
private investments, a general non-secular vision of power, and a managerial approach to politics. The political campaign is largely funded by the private fortune of Slim Riahi, and uses it as a claim that he is not prone to corruption: he doesn't need public money. His campaign has been based on the capillary presence in poor neighborhoods and the promise of work and economic help to families and young unemployed citizens.

During legislative elections, his party took the third largest share of votes and securing 16 seats in the newly formed parlaiment. Though following well behind Nidaa Tounes (86 seats) and Ennhada (69 seats) their representation in the parliament has given Riahi's party a decisive role in the government's future composition.

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The Last Refugees in Choucha, Tunisia...
Choucha
By Filippo Del Bubba
16 Oct 2014

October 16, 2014
Choucha Refugee Camp, Southern Tunisia

The UNHCR Choucha Refugee Camp opened in 2011, seven kilometres away from the Ras Ajdir border crossing, to help the thousands of people fleeing the conflict in Libya. Most of the those who fled in 2011, returned home, but some 4,000 could not go back for fear of persecution. These individuals were granted refugee status by the UNHCR. Tunisia did not – and still does not – consider applicants for refugee status. According to UNHCR, most of the refugees from Choucha have already been taken by the United States (1,717) and Norway (485). The EU has been fairly strict on resettlement; Germany took the most refugees at 201, Britain took three, Italy two and France one. However, some still remain as they have nowhere else to go.
The Choucha camp was officially closed in June 2013, but approximately one hundred refugees still remain there. They insisted on remaining in the camp after it was closed despite the fact that all UNHCR food, water, and medical services were cut-off on June 30. 260 of the camp’s inhabitants, categorized as “rejected asylum seekers,” now find themselves in a dire situation. Falling outside of the UNHCR’s mandate, they are not entitled to the integration services that the organization offers to refugees and asylum seekers. The last time that the rejected asylum seekers here received food distribution aid was in October 2012. One of them is Bright O Samson, who is fighting against eviction from the camp, and is demanding resettlement to a safe third country with effective system of asylum seeker protection. Ismail is from Sudan and he fled to Libya in 2003 due to the war in his country. There, he found peace and a job as a mechanic, but the 2011 uprising forced him to leave again and cross the border into Tunisia. With no official structure supporting them, Ismail and other refugees from Chad, Ghana, Sudan, Liberia, and many other African countries, say they feel like they've been totally abandoned.

Full 30 minute video available: http://www.transterramedia.com/media/49074

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Tunisia's Slim Riahi: From Football t...
Tunis
By Filippo Del Bubba
13 Oct 2014

No one in Tunisia knew about Slim Riahi when the Tunisian revolution started in 2010. Four years later, he is challenging the main political forces by becoming his newly founded party’s candidate for the presidency.

Born in Efidha in 1972, he grew up in exile in Libya where he studied management and build up his economic empire in the oil production, energy, aviation and property development industries. He recently moved to London, where he held both Tunisian and British citizenship.

The aftermath of the Tunisian revolution against ex-president Ben Ali, offered Slim the opportunity to come back to his country of origin and to found a political party, the Free Patriotic Union (UPL); to acquire a 20-percent stake of Dar Assabah, the newspaper publisher; to create three TV stations including Ettounsiya Al-Oula, Ettounsiya Sport and Ettounsiya News; and to become the president of Club Africain, Tunisia’s oldest football club.

Now, on the eve of Tunisian elections, he is in the running for President of the Republic as his party, UPL, is poised to become the third major party in the country, tipping the balance decisively between Ennhada and Nida Tounes.

How can football promote a political career? How can financial strategies build political credibility? Europeans remembers the Italian experience of former president Berlusconi, the owner of Milan’s football club and of three of Italy’s most important television stations. Will “football to politics” work in Tunisia, a country still seeking a way forward after revolutions shook up the country’s old political order?

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Tunisia: The Guardians of The Saints
Tunis
By Steven Wassenaar
10 Feb 2014

Sitting at the entrance of the Manoubia Mausoleum in Tunis, 77 year old Zezya Riahi, remembers the night of October 16th, 2012 as if it had happened yesterday. That night, the woman who had been the caretaker of the grave of a Saint for over 45 years, was attacked by Salafi Muslims who set the mausoleum on fire. “They were five and wearing weapons. They took all my money and burned the tomb of the saint with a burning tire. A Quran and old manuscripts, which were over 1000 years old, went up in smoke. It’s a tragedy for Tunisia and its religious heritage”, she says. Since 2011, over 80 mausoleums have been destroyed or burned down by radical Muslims who believe the tombs are incompatible with the Islamic tradition and blame worshippers for associating saints in the mausoleums to Allah. These temples - the oldest was built in the 11th century - are inhabited and mostly maintained by women whose jobs are passed on to later generations. In Tunis, they are known as the "Saints’ Servers". Aged between 30 and 80 years, they are responsible for cleaning, maintaining and welcoming worshippers. They earn a living through the charity of worshippers and dedicate themselves, body and soul, to their saints. On the heights of la Marsa, a suburb of Tunis facing the Mediterranean Sea, the sisters Benfadj have been talking care of the Mausoleum Abdelaziz El-Mahdi for half a century. They live in a house adjoining the temple and have dedicated their lives to their saint. “We are his servants. We were born here and we have never worked anywhere else. We are in charge of the cleaning. We pray, we give information to worshippers. We love our saint and thank him for this beautiful life”, says 58 year old Alouma. However, on January 10th, the mausoleum was almost burned down. A jerrycan was set on fire and darkened the walls without damaging the huge tomb decorated with carpets and verses from the Quran. “These people are not Muslims, they have no religion if they destroy our heritage”, she says. Today, the two sisters are worried because none of their daughters want to take over their legacy. “Our children work hard and they are married. It is difficult for the younger generation to get involved in this work. This vocation tends to disappear “, they explain. Seraz is the guardian of the Mausoleum of Sidi Lasmer, located in the old district of "Medina" the heart of Tunis. He is the only child in his family. Before him, his mother and grandmother took turns to looking after and maintaining the gravestone of their ancestor, Sidi lasmer, who died 750 years ago. “My mother did not give birth to a girl. As a result, I am her successor. I am proud to perpetuate the tradition”, he says. However, Seraz fears for the safety of this family heritage. “When the mausoleum is open to the public, we keep a close eye on visitors. We need to pay attention. Police guards are also standing at the entrance”, he adds. This photo essay documents the lives of women like Khira, 79, guardian of the Temple of Sidi Mehrez for 50 years. Sahla l’Abidi, 82, servant of Sidi El Bechir. And Sofia, 51. These mausoleum caretakers have dedicated their lives to the saints they protect and are still looking over their graves despite the Islamist threat. On January 7, 2014 the mausoleum of Saleh Ghadbani in Kasserine was burned down. On february 24, 2014, the mausoleum of Sidi Bakai in Chawatt was also destroyed. Finally, the mausoleum of Sidi An Nawi was attacked on April 16, 2014 in Zaghouan. French: A l’entrée du mausolée de la Manoubia, à Tunis, Zezya Riahi, 77 ans, se souvient de la nuit du 16 octobre 2012 comme si c’était hier. Gardienne du tombeau de cette sainte depuis 45 ans, Zezya a été attaquée par plusieurs salafistes qui ont incendié le temple. « Ils étaient cinq et cagoulés. Ils ont volé mon argent et ont brûlé la tombe avec un pneu aspergé d’essence. Des manuscrits vieux de 1000 ans et des Coran sont partis en fumée. Au fil des conflits et des guerres de religion, jamais personne ne s’en était pris aux mausolées », souligne-t-elle. Depuis la chute de Ben Ali en 2011, les attaques contre les mausolées et les lieux de culte des confrérie soufies, très nombreux en Tunisie, se sont multipliées. Ces lieux de cultes sont dans la ligne de mire d'islamistes rigoristes qui considèrent que la prière des saints est une hérésie. Ces derniers reprochent aux musulmans de personnifier Dieu à travers des saints. Ces temples, dont les plus vieux datent du 10e siècle, sont habités et occupés majoritairement par des femmes qui se transmettent la garde de ces lieux de culte de génération en génération. A Tunis, on les appelle les servantes des saints. Agées entre 30 et 80 ans, elles sont chargées de garder, d’entretenir et accueillir les fidèles. Elles ne vivent que de l’aumône et de la charité, se dévouant corps et âmes pour leurs saints. Sur les hauteurs de la Marsa, en face de la Méditerranée, les sœurs Benfadj veillent sur le mausolée d’Abdelaziz El-Mahdi depuis un demi-siècle. Elles habitent une maisonnette mitoyenne du temple et consacrent leur vie à leur saint. « On est ses servantes. On est née ici et on s’occupe à plein temps de notre saint. On n’a jamais travaillé ailleurs, on fait le ménage, on prie, on renseigne les fidèles. On est folle de son amour et il nous le rend bien », confie Alouma, 58 ans. Le 10 janvier dernier, le mausolée a failli brûler, une bouteille d’essence enflammée a noirci les murs, sans toucher l’immense tombe décorée de draps et de versets du Coran. « Ces gens-là ne sont pas des musulmans, ils n’ont pas de religion pour détruire notre patrimoine », poursuit-elle. Aujourd’hui, les deux sœurs s’inquiètent car dans la famille, aucune de leur fille ne souhaite prendre la relève. « Elles travaillent et ont leur vie. C’est difficile pour la jeune génération de s’impliquer dans ce travail. C’est un sacerdoce qui va disparaître », conclut-elle. Au cœur de la médina, Seraz est le seul garçon de la famille. Avant lui, sa mère et sa grand-mère se sont relayées pour entretenir la tombe de leur ancêtre, Sidi lasmer, mort il y a 750 ans. « Ma mère n’a pas eu de fille, c’est moi qui m’en occupe et j’en suis plus que fier de poursuivre la lignée », dit l'homme qui craint cependant pour la sécurité de ce bien de famille. « Quand on ouvre le mausolée au public, on surveille les gens, on fait attention. La police garde aussi l’entrée », explique-t-il. Ce reportage photo illustre la vie de femmes telles que Khira, 79 ans, gardienne du temple de Sidi Mehrez depuis 50 ans, Sahla l’Abidi, 82 ans, servante de Sidi El Bechir et Sofia, 51 ans. Toutes ces femmes sont des gardiennes de mausolées et continuent à veiller sur les tombes de leurs saints malgré la menace islamiste.

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Islamists Raised Slogans against the ...
tunis, Tunisia
By Mohamed Krit
16 Jan 2014

Islamists raised slogans against the new constitution.Islamists raised slogans against the new constitution. Islamist women with papers talks about what they need in the new constitution and insulte the democratic party. Front the ANC, Bardo, Tunis, Tunisia. JAN, 17th. 2014

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Islamists Raised Slogans Against the ...
tunis, Tunisia
By Mohamed Krit
16 Jan 2014

Islamists raised slogans against the new constitution. Adel Almi the president of the Party " Tunisia Zaytuna" talk to medias. Front the ANC, Bardo, Tunis, Tunisia. JAN, 17th. 2014

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Islamists Raised Slogans Against the ...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Mohamed Krit
31 Dec 2013

Islamists raised slogans against the new constitution. Adel Almi the president of the Party " Tunisia Zaytuna" talk to medias. Front the ANC, Bardo, Tunis, Tunisia. JAN, 17th. 2014

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Islamists Raised Slogans Against the ...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Mohamed Krit
31 Dec 2013

Islamists raised slogans against the new constitution. Adel Almi the president of the Party " Tunisia Zaytuna" talk to medias. Front the ANC, Bardo, Tunis, Tunisia. JAN, 17th. 2014

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Islamists Raised Slogans Against the ...
tunis, Tunisia
By Mohamed Krit
31 Dec 2013

Islamists raised slogans against the new constitution. Youth rise slogan anti new constitution. Front the ANC, Bardo, Tunis, Tunisia. JAN, 17th. 2014

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Training course for young Tunisian.
Tunisia
By Moez Samarana
05 Nov 2013

this video is about a training session for students and instructors about childhood and how to express through practices sports and recreational activities.

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Tunisian revolution.
Tunisa
By Bassem Aounallah
31 Oct 2013

Towards a new social contract in Tunisia.

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Tunisia after the revolution.
tunisa
By Nabil Ahmadi
14 Oct 2013

Video about : Protests to overthrow the government and claims of unity among Tunisians.

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Tunisian government formation.
tunisia
By fatijournaliste
14 Oct 2013

Video about : Political alliances between the Troika and some political parties to form a government of Tunisia.

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Secular or Salafism in Tunisia.
Tunisia
By krimi najeh
10 Oct 2013

Video about : An interview with the Minister of Religious Affairs in Tunisia about his position of the system of governance that will come after the revolution.

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Waste crisis in Tunisia.
tunisia
By krimi najeh
10 Oct 2013

Video about : Landfill is a source for children to search for solids they sell in addition on to being a food for cattle posing a threat to the lives of the population.

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Protests in Tunisia.
tunisia
By zied ammari
09 Oct 2013

Video about : Demonstrations to overthrow the Tunisian government, which is headed by "Mohamed Ghannouchi".

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Flame of the Tunisian Revolution.
tunisa
By Bassem Aounallah
08 Oct 2013

Video about: Mohamed Bouazizi, the beginning of the Tunisian revolution that spark followed by revolutions in several Arab countries.

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Tourism in Tunisia.
tunisa
By Aymen Ayari
01 Oct 2013

Video about : Political instability threatens the tourism sector in Tunisia.

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Poverty a barrier to treatment.
kasserine
By Borhen Yahyaoui
27 Sep 2013

Video about : Tunisian family tragedy has been unable to cover the costs of the treatment of her son due to poverty.

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Tunisia security
Tunisa
By Aich Fadhlouni
27 Aug 2013

video about: A statement to the custodians and imam of the mosque, which stormed tunisia police search for fugitives.

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The fight against corruption in Tunisia
Tunisa
By Raja_Yahyaoui
26 Aug 2013

Video about:The press conference that was held to know the project "Integrity against corruption".

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We are Plurality, We are Tunisia (25 ...
Tunis, Tunisia
By francesca_oggiano
10 Aug 2013

Mohamed is a militant of the Jamhoury party. He joined the sit-in in Bardo to ask for the resignation of Ennahda. "We want to save our nation," he said. "We're asking for the resignation of the government and for elections. We demand a technical government who can end the Constituent composition and to lead Tunisia until the elections. We are not going to leave Bardo until our requests will be accepted and exercised". Tunis, Tunisia, August, 2013.

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We are Plurality, We are Tunisia (24 ...
Tunis, Tunisia
By francesca_oggiano
10 Aug 2013

Wassida is an independent picketer. She joined the Bardo sit-in on the first day. "I want to save my nation from Ennahda project," she says. "Tunisia is a mix of cultures - not only black flags and Salafists. That's why I took the Tunisian flag with me. We don't want the Islamization of our beautiful country. We are not Qatar or Saudi Arabia, neither USA or France. We are Tunisians, we are plurality and we respect each other". Tunis, Tunisia, August, 2013.